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Faith in Spring – Frühlingsglaube

28 Aug

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German Verse by Ludwig Uhland

In the original German with a
line-by-line prose translation in English

Frühlingsglaube Faith in Spring
von Ludwig Uhland Prose translation by Hyde Flippo

Die linden Lüfte sind erwacht, The gentle winds are awakened,
Sie säuseln und wehen
Tag und Nacht,
They murmur and waft
day and night,
Sie schaffen an allen Enden. They create in every corner.
O frischer Duft, o neuer Klang! Oh fresh scent, oh new sound!
Nun, armes Herze, sei nicht bang! Now, poor dear [heart], fear not!
Nun muss sich alles, alles wenden. Now everything, everything must change.
Die Welt wird schöner
mit jedem Tag,
The world becomes more beautiful
with each day,
Man weiß nicht,
was noch werden mag,
One does not know
what may yet happen,
Das Blühen will nicht enden. The blooming doesn’t want to end.
Es blüht das fernste, tiefste Tal: The farthest, deepest valley blooms:
Nun, armes Herz, vergiss der Qual! Now, poor dear [heart], forget the pain!
Nun muss sich alles, alles wenden. Now everything, everything must change.

Send a greeting card with
lines from this Uhland poem.

I used to know this poem by heart. And I am still pretty familiar with it. Some of the verses come back to me whenever I experience a most beautiful early spring day. Just recently we had such a day with very “gentle winds”  that  “murmur and waft”.  Maybe I would say gentle breezes instead of winds. The poem speaks about these feelings of hope that are awakened in spring. On a beautiful springlike day, such as we had the other day, one feels immensely uplifted.

Today is the 28th of August 2015. Our daughter Gabriele died in 2012. She would have been 58 today.

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Monarch Cafe

27 Aug

https://www.google.com.au/maps/place/Monarch+Cakes/@-37.8681082,144.9795341,3a,75y,335.86h,84.72t/data=!3m7!1e1!3m5!1sTQ6DtMc2Ga5fLnHPyzglTQ!2e0!3e2!7i13312!8i6656!4m2!3m1!1s0x0:0x16310decdadc11d!6m1!1e1

TRAM ROUTE MAP EAST BRUNSWICK – ST KILDA BEACH:

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On Monday, the 17th of August, 2015, we were still in Melbourne.

http://auntyuta.com/2015/08/22/last-cab-to-darwin/

After Peter and I  had seen the movie “Last Cab to Darwin” in the KINO in Melbourne, it was our plan to get to the Monarch Cafe. We knew that TRAM 96 would take us there to ST KILDA.

Somewhere in the city we got unto the 96 tram. We soon found out it was not going to St Kilda but to Brunswick. This meant we had to get off the tram and catch a tram into the other direction. The trams come along every six or seven minutes. So we were soon on our way towards ST KILDA. There are several stops within ST KILDA. We were not sure where to get off. Somehow the Canterbury Road stop looked to us like the right stop. Wasn’t that the corner where Acland Street was with the Monash Cafe just around the corner. we thought. It turned out we were wrong. There was no Acland Street. It took us quite a while and a lot of walking before we found Acland Street and the way to our chosen cafe. When we finally made it, we had some yummy cake and coffee. Next time we know we have to get off at Belford Street, just one stop before the terminal.

In April 2013 we were in Melbourne. Martin and his daughter Lauren went with us to ST KILDA.

In April 2013 we were in Melbourne. Martin and his daughter Lauren went with us to ST KILDA.

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In April 2013 Peter and I went with Lauren and Martin to the MONARCH CAFE.

In April 2013 Peter and I went with Lauren and Martin to the MONARCH CAFE.

This is a picture from inside the Monarch Cafe.

This is a picture from inside the Monarch Cafe.

We love their cakes and coffee!

We love their cakes and coffee!

The Fuggerei is the world’s oldest social housing complex still in use.

10 Aug

Fuggerei

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Fuggerei is the world’s oldest social housing complex still in use. It is a walled enclave within the city ofAugsburg, Bavaria. It takes it name from the Fugger family and was founded in 1516 by Jakob Fugger the Younger (known as “Jakob Fugger the Rich”) as a place where the needy citizens of Augsburg could be housed. By 1523, 52 houses had been built, and in the coming years the area expanded with various streets, small squares and a church. The gates were locked at night, so the Fuggerei was, in its own right, very similar to a small independent medieval town. It is still inhabited today, affording it the status of being the oldest social housing project in the world.

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Description

The rent was and is still one Rheinischer Gulden per year (equivalent to 0.88 euros), as well as three daily prayers for the current owners of the Fuggerei — the Lord’s Prayer, Hail Mary, and the Nicene Creed. The conditions to live there remain the same as they were 480 years ago: one must have lived at least two years in Augsburg, be of the Catholic faith and have become indigent without debt. The five gates are still locked every day at 10 PM.

Housing units in the area consist of 45 to 65 square meter (500–700 square foot) apartments, but because each unit has its own street entrance it simulates living in a house. There is no shared accommodation; each family has its own apartment, which includes a kitchen, a parlour, a bedroom and a tiny spare room, altogether totaling about 60 square metres. Ground-floor apartments all have a small garden and garden shed, while upper-floor apartments have an attic. All apartments have modern conveniences such as television and running water. One ground-floor apartment is uninhabited, serving as a museum open to the public. The doorbells have elaborate shapes, each being unique, dating back to before the installation of streetlights when residents could identify their unit by feeling the handle in the dark.

History

The Fugger family initially established their wealth in weaving and merchandising. Jakob the Rich expanded their interests into silver mining and trading with Venice. Additionally he was a financier and counted the Vatican as a notable client. The family became financial backers of the Habsburg family and he financed the successful election of Charles V as Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire in 1519.[1]

The Fuggerei was first built between 1514 and 1523 under the supervision of the architect Thomas Krebs, and in 1582 Hans Holl added St. Mark’s Church to the settlement. Expanded further in 1880 and 1938, the Fuggerei today comprises 67 houses with 147 apartments, a well, and an administrative building.

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s great-grandfather, the mason Franz Mozart, lived in the Fuggerei between 1681 and 1694, and is commemorated today by a stone plaque.

The Fuggerei was heavily damaged by the bombings of Augsburg during World War II, but has been rebuilt in its original style.

Upkeep

The Fuggerei is supported by a charitable trust established in 1520 which Jakob Fugger funded with an initial deposit of 10,000 guilders.[1 According to the Wall Street Journal the trust has been carefully managed with most of its income coming from forestry holdings, which the Fugger family favored since the 17th century after losing money on higher yielding investments. The annual return on the trust has ranged from an after inflation rate of 0.5% to 2%. Currently the trust is administered by Wolf-Dietrich Graf von Hundt.

As of 2011, the fee for a tour into the Fuggerei is 4.00 euro — over four times the annual rent.

In 1977 Peter and I visited my cousin Renate and her family in Munich. From Munich we did a day trip to visit my uncle Edmund and his wife Flora in Augsburg. Among other things we visited with them the Augsburg Fuggerei. For lunch they invited us to the close by FUGGEREI STUBE.

Neptunbrunnen and Entrance to the Fuggerei

Neptunbrunnen and Entrance to the Fuggerei

A street in the Fuggerei in 1977

A street in the Fuggerei in 1977

Peter on the left, Uncle E behind Uta

Peter on the left, Uncle E behind Uta

A Restaurant near the Fuggerei

A Restaurant near the Fuggerei

Before and after the Fall of the Wall (Memories)

23 Jul

 

Sunday, the 16th of September, 2012.

On that day we were travelling by public transport to Borgsdorf visiting Ingrid and Erhard at their summer place. Ingrid is related to Peter’s family. Over the years we were always happy to visit Ingrid and Erhard whenever we happened to be in Berlin. On the phone Ingrid wanted to make sure we would come on Sunday. When I mentioned I still had a bit of a cold she said, not to worry, it was going to be a lovely, sunny day. I could just sit outside in the sun and this would do me good. I didn’t have to do anything. She was going to cook lunch for us, she said.

She did serve us a wonderful lunch. She loves to cook with healthy ingredients and lots of herbs and vegetables from her garden. I really felt all right sitting in the autumn sun for hours and hours, being served a lovely meal and later on coffee and cakes. Before the coffee break we all went for a walk to the close by river. Borgsdorf is a very secluded little village. In people’s gardens we could see fruit trees with hundreds of red apples on them.

This is an extract from a blog I wrote after our visit to Berlin in 2012:

http://auntyuta.com/2013/01/28/visiting-peoples-gardens-on-the-fringes-of-berlin/

 

My brother Peter Uwe had dropped us off at Berlin Tegel Airport. It was already afternoon, so he wanted to drive back straight away to his place in Mecklenburg/Vorpommern, where we had stayed with him and Astrid for the last few days of our holiday.

We checked in and then had plenty of time to have a drink with the six family members  who had come to see us off:
Peter’s cousin Ingrid, Peter’s nephew Daniel, Peter’s sister Ilse, and all their partners, all had come to farewell us.

It turned out, the flight to Amsterdam was delayed. Because of this,  we got into trouble with our connecting flight in Amsterdam. We had in Amsterdam actually less than one hour to get to our connecting flight. When I pointed this out to a cabin crew member he inquired about my age and whether I could walk all right. I told him I couldn’t walk as fast as younger people. Voila, a drive on a buggy was arranged for Peter and me.

Being driven through the immense airport with passengers roaming about and making way for the buggy, we felt like in a movie. It was a long, long drive to the departure point for our connecting flight. I doubt I could have made it in time by walking. We were extremely grateful for the lift and were able to board on time on the long stretch to Kuala Lumpur.

At Kuala Lumpur Airport we had a seven hour rest. From there we took off  on a seven hour flight to Sydney.  The longest non-stop stretch was from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur, namely eleven hours! During this long flight Peter got sick. After that he had hardly anything to eat anymore.

I got distracted again. Searching for some pictures of Ingrid and Erhard,  I finally found the departure pictures that Peter took at Berlin Tegel Airport. You can look at them here:

http://auntyuta.com/2012/11/21/resting-at-kuala-lumpur-airport/

 

All the above happened in 2012. The wall had come down already in 1989. We were still thinking about it and all the changes it had brought. Berlin was an undivided city again, East- and West-Germany were one country. But we could still remember what it was like before the Fall of the Wall.

BACK IN AUSTRALIA

I wrote the following on the 19th of November 2012:

Peter and I  landed safely back in Australia. Yesterday morning our daughter Caroline picked us up from Sydney airport and drove us to our home (100 km south of Sydney). So we’ve been back home now for nearly thirty hours and are gradually getting rid of our jet legs. Everything is fine at our place. Our lovely daughter is going to stay with us till tomorrow (Tuesday).

Six people had come to Berlin Tegel airport on Friday to see us off. We found the perfect place to have a drink with them. This was very relaxing for us. We knew already that our plane to Amsterdam was going to leave somewhat later than originally planned. My brother had driven us to the airport from his place in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern. He had only dropped us off,  for he wanted to  be  back home before it got too dark.

In Amsterdam we had scarce time to catch the connecting flight to Kuala Lumpur. We made sure we’d get some help by the airport people. Just as well! It turned out we had to go  right to the other end of the airport. This would have meant a tremendous walk for us. We were very grateful for being driven to our departure point. I doubt that we could have made it on time by walking.

In Kuala Lumpur we had close to seven hours to catch our Malaysian connecting flight to Sydney. This meant we had no problem with being on time for boarding at the departure gate. It also gave us the opportunity to stretch our legs a bit and then take a break in a beautifully furnished cafe with French songs playing in the background. The toilet facilities were also very welcome. We couldn’t take a walk through the airport’s beautiful open air jungle walk since it was closed for renovations. What a pity!

Near our departure gate we found some stretch-out chairs.  To be able to stretch out on these chairs we welcomed very much.

Some pictures of these stretch out chairs you can actually find in this blog:

http://auntyuta.com/2012/11/21/resting-at-kuala-lumpur-airport/

I wrote in this blog further on:

We were grateful for the long break at Kuala Lumpur Airport. It gave us ample time to recover a bit from the previous eleven hour non-stop flight. In Kuala Lumpur Peter even enjoyed the coffee and cake we had at one of the airport’s coffee-shops. At some other establishment we had a large glass of iced Chi tea. This tasted very good and was very refreshing. On the next seven hour stretch  to Sydney Peter refused food again. However he had lots of drinks all the time: Mainly water, but also some juice and coffee. He just didn’t feel like eating.

 

My main purpose of looking up all these posts was actually that I wanted to be reminded what experiences we had on previous visits to Berlin when the city was divided by that Wall. There was a lot of confusion going on about currencies in East and West, lifestyle changes dividing East and West, crippling shortages in the East. a lot of spying going on in the East, West-Berliners making nasty remarks about the “poor” East-Berliners and so on.

And after the Fall of the Wall? To this day these parts of Germany that had previously been GDR territory are still a bit less prosperous than their cousins in the other parts of Germany. Yes, it is one country again, but you do find differences. People in the East seem to be somewhat different from people in the West. The unemployment rate is much higher in the eastern parts of Germany. West-German companies seem to prefer to go to a neighbouring Eastern country where they can pay lower wages.

For some time low cost housing was available in East-Germany. In areas where there is work or tourism, housing prices are on the up. In some remote areas, where there is no work, low cost housing is of no use to the people. It is unbelievable, but people who cannot afford any more to pay for housing and live on the streets for most of the year, these people are on the increase, while other people gentrify their places, and they invest in places they can let for more and more rent. How about this attitude that “the Market” regulates all?

 

 

 

 

 

Memories: A Job at last

22 Jul

I started my first job on the 2nd of January 1953.  I very much dreaded the upcoming exams at Commercial College (Höhere Wirtschaftsschule). This is why I was overjoyed when I managed to land a job. It gave me the opportunity to leave school without having to do any exams. I wrote about it in November 2009 and copy it here:

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Meeting with Granddaughters in Melbourne Two Years ago

20 Jun

I copy here a blog that I published two years ago. At the time we had spent a lovely evening with Justine and Lauren. Both their birthdays are in June. They are six years apart. Justine lives in Melbourne and Lauren lives in Newcastle. Because it is their birthday this month, I thought I republish this blog which has a few lovely pictures with the birthday girls.

http://auntyuta.com/2013/04/22/out-and-about-in-melbourne/

Famous sculpture at the Yarra River in Melbourne.

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Peter, granddaughter Lauren and I had been waiting at Flinders Street Station for granddaughter Justine who was going to meet us there after work. It was a happy meeting after not having seen each other for sooo long!

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Uta and granddaughters at the Yarra River

Uta and granddaughters at the Yarra River

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Dinner at Il PRIMO POSTO, Italian Restaurant

Dinner at Il PRIMO POSTO, Italian Restaurant

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After dinner we strolled to a Gelato shop that was still open. We each had a little tub of this delicious gelato and sat down at a large table with a terrific view of the Yarra.

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This was a lovely night out with the granddaughters. Justine caught the train back home from Flinders Street Station. Peter and I went with Lauren by train back to Essendon where our son Martin was waiting with the car to take us home.

A visit to Australia’s Wonderland in Sept. 1988 and another Visit to Canberra in Jan1989

12 Jun
Caroline with friend Amy in Australia's Wonderland, Sept.1988

Caroline with friend Amy in Australia’s Wonderland, Sept.1988

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In January 1989, during the summer school holidays, we went with Caroline, Troy and Ryan to Canberra. Previously we had stayed in Canberra only for the day, driving back home on the same day. During the kids’ summer holidays and Peter having a few days rostered off, we took the chance to book into a Canberra motel to stay there for a couple of nights.

This is a park in Goulbourn, where we stopped for some refreshments on the way to Canberra.

This is a park in Goulbourn, where we stopped for some refreshments on the way to Canberra.

Let's do a city tour here in Canberra.

Let’s do a city tour here in Canberra.

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A Trainride around the Cockington Greens

A Trainride around the Cockington Greens

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A Toytrain at Cockington Green

A Toytrain at Cockington Green

Having some Fun at the Motel's Swimming Pool.

Having some Fun at the Motel’s Swimming Pool.

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