Tag Archives: Australia

Sea Level Rises

17 Sep

Sea level rises due to climate change could cost Australia $200b, Climate Council report finds

Updated 25 minutes agoWed 17 Sep 2014, 6:18am

Future sea level rises could put more than $200 billion of Australian infrastructure at risk, a report by the Climate Council has found.

The report, Counting the Costs: Climate Change and Coastal Flooding, showed sea levels were likely to rise by between 40 centimetres and one metre over the next century.

The Climate Council succeeded the Australian Climate Commission, which was axed after the Federal Government took office last year.

The report’s lead author, Professor Will Steffen, warned national income would suffer huge losses if action was not taken to protect against rising sea levels and extreme weather events.

“You’re looking at anywhere from three tenths of a per cent of loss of GDP per year, all the way up to 9 per cent loss of GDP per year,” Professor Steffen said.

Coastal flooding report:

At least $226 billion of infrastructure exposed to flooding and erosion (with a 1.1m sea level rise), including:

  • $81b – commercial buildings
  • $72b – residential
  • $67b – road and rail
  • $6b – light industrial buildings

Source: Climate Council

“That upper scenario is higher than the growth rate of GDP per year, so you’re looking basically at staggering economic costs if we don’t get this under control.”

The Victorian coast, the south-east corner of Queensland and Sydney would be the hardest hit by rising sea levels, the report found.

With more than 75 per cent of Australians living near the coast, Professor Steffen said large swathes of infrastructure were at risk.

“Much of our road, rail, port facilities, airports and so on are on the coast,” he said.

“If you look at a 1.1 metre sea level rise – which is the high-end scenario for 2100 but that’s what we’re tracking towards – you’re looking at more than $200 billion worth of infrastructure that’s at risk.”

Professor Steffen said so-called once-in-a-lifetime natural events could become regular occurrences.

“If you look at some of our most vulnerable areas, and the Sydney region is one of those, you would say toward the end of this century that a one-in-100-year flood is going to be happening every few days,” he said.

“That’s an impossible situation to cope with.”

Professor Steffen said infrastructure projects, like the new runway planned for Brisbane’s airport, needed to factor in future sea rises.

“The people who are investing actually went to the best scientists here in Australia, experts of sea level rises, and took the best science into account and decided they were going to build that third runway higher than previously planned,” he said.

If sea level rises were ignored, by 2050 the report predicted the global the impact of coastal flooding would cost $US1 trillion per year – the same size as the Australian economy.

Climate change impacting insurance premiums

The Climate Council warned sea level rises would put pressure on home insurance premiums, as rising sea levels fed coastal erosion.

Australian Local Government Association president Felicity-Ann Lewis said erosion was already causing problems for home owners.

National infrastructure within 200 metres of the coastline:

  • 120 ports
  • five power stations/substations
  • three water treatment plants
  • 258 police, fire and ambulance stations
  • 75 hospitals and health services
  • 11 emergency services facilities
  • 41 waste disposal facilities

“The insurance industry is very interested in this because some of the insurance premiums are becoming such that people can’t afford to take out insurance on their properties,” Dr Lewis said.

“This is a very big issue.”

Dr Lewis said a lack of coordination across all levels of government was impeding action.

“It’s a very mixed bag; there is no consistent view or approach for local government to try to deal with this,” she said.

“Each state and territory association is trying to deal with different guidelines; there is no consensus around that, so for us it’s a very big challenge.”

Sydney 7 – 18 Celsius sunny

4 Aug

Hi, it is Monday, the 4th of August 2014, a bit after 7 am.
I just looked up the temperatures for Sydney. It says it is there 7 C at present but it feels like only 5 C which I believe equals 40 F. Here where I am the temperatures are similar to Sydney. In Canberra, which is more inland, the temperatures during night time did go down to below freezing point for the last few days.

It has not rained much the last few weeks. I looks like our fire season starts early this year. This is what out Rural Fire Service states:

“Across NSW there are more than 700 #NSWRFS firefighters working on 84 bush and grass fires. …”

Apparently it burns only in some northern parts of New South Wales at the moment. (NSW is a huge area, about the size of the whole of Germany!) Still, we have to be prepared with warmer weather coming up and not much rain, there is definitely going to be increased risk of bush fires in the coming months or even weeks.

It feels strange to have to think of bush fires when we have such a tremendous cold spell right now!

What Joseph Stiglitz says

12 Jul

Two big lessons of economic research over the past 10 years are that inequality is not the result of inexorable laws of economics but rather of policy; and that countries that adopt policies that lead to high inequality pay a high price – inequality not only leads to a divided society and undermines democracy, but it weakens economic performance. Hopefully, as Australia debates its new government’s budget and economic “reforms,” it bears this in mind.

Joseph Stiglitz is the winner of the 2001 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics. He is a former chairman of President Clinton’s Council of Economic Advisers and Chief Economist of the World Bank. His most recent book is The Price of Inequality: How Today’s Divided Society Endangers Our Future.

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/comment/inequality-why-australia-must-not-follow-the-us-20140706-zsxtk.html#ixzz37CagNfYh

Homelessness in Australia

11 Jun

http://theaimn.com/kids-ok-can-go-beg/#comments

If you go to the above link you are going to find a very well written post about social conditions in Australia published by

THE AUSTRALIAN INDEPENDENT MEDIA NETWORK

The Budget, Housing and the State of Economics

3 Jun

I received the following as an email already on the 26th of May. I am a bit late in thinking about publishing it. But it might still interest some bloggers in Australia who are interested in Earthsharing & Prosper’s insights on budget, housing and the state of economics

I ask myself, why are capital gains ignored in the budget?

THE ENEWS OF PROSPER & EARTHSHARING AUSTRALIA
MAY 2014

The state of economics

Welcome to the second Evolving Economics enews, combining the Earthsharing and Prosper Australia news lists. This knowledge is important in an age of entitlements, where welfare is demonised and unearned incomes (a.k.a. capital gains) are ignored. Take a quick look at these budget costs:

Jobseekers – $10bn p.a
Family Tax Benefits – $19bn
National Disability Insurance – $17bn
Medicare – $20bn
Imputed rents (unrealised capital gains) – $484bn in residential real estate alone.

So why tax students, the poor and the productive when so much revenue potential exists in economic rents?

With much talk about the ‘1996 Howard Costello tough budget’, we are reminded of the change since. In 1996, First Home Owners borrowed just $95,000 on average. Today that has more than tripled to $303,000. Wages have only increased by $214%, compared to 319% in housing (read land) costs.

This federal budget will cost the poorest 20% of the population, the lowest quintile, $2.9 billion over four years. However the wealthiest 20%, those earning $88,000 or more, will pay just $1.78 billion – 40% less.

It is time the public spoke up on the record capital gains occurring in housing, mining and other natural monopolies. That is our specialty here on the Evolving Economics enews. We hope you find this information of use and can join us to maintain this knowledge base, continuing to push governments towards a refined economic system that encourages productive activity over speculative largess. See our recent press releases.

GABBYS AT BERRY

2 Jun

img244

RIMG1935

RIMG1937

This is the Gabbys House where you can have High Tea ($45 per person) for a Relaxed and Delightful Afternoon! Maybe we could consider this for my 80th Birthday? Well, just a thought.

img245

Or what about this place for Lunch? Lunch would probably cost only half as much. Plenty of time to think about it, more than three months actually.

But now let’s go along Queen Street a bit more. We are actually now on the side of Queen Street where the Old Post Office Building is.

RIMG1926

img246

On the way we saw this map in one of the windows.

On the way we saw this map in one of the windows.

RIMG1939

RIMG1940

RIMG1947

This Bakery Shop is somehow connected with the French Bakery Restaurant in the other street.

This Bakery Shop is somehow connected with the French Bakery Restaurant in the other street.

RIMG1949

RIMG1956 (3)

RIMG1952

RIMG1951

RIMG1950

RIMG1953

RIMG1954

We had done a lot of walking and headed back to our car.

We had done a lot of walking and headed back to our car.

Just outside Berry Peter stopped the car again to get out and take a picture of the beautiful landscape. I felt tired and stayed in the car. But I took some pictures from inside the car and later on I tried to catch from inside the car a bit about the road building activities. Peter had to drive slowly within the construction area.

RIMG1958

RIMG1960

RIMG1959

RIMG1961

Everywhere are sections where a lot of earth has to be moved for the widening of the highway.

Everywhere are sections where a lot of earth has to be moved for the widening of the highway.

RIMG1967

RIMG1972

RIMG1974

A new bridge is being built.

A new bridge is being built.

RIMG1976

A truck that's being used for road building.

A truck that’s being used for road building.

The ocean can be seen a bit to the right of the road.

The ocean can be seen a bit to the right of the road.

RIMG1980

RIMG1981

Passing Kiama Exit

Passing Kiama Exit

RIMG1983

Passing Old Kiama Cemetary

This old Kiama Cemetery can be seen from the highway.

Visiting Berry (continued)

2 Jun

RIMG1888

This is “Paulchen”, our fourteen year old car. In 2001, when Peter’s sister Ilse stayed with us for three months and “Paulchen” was still fairly new, Ilse lovingly called the car “Paulchen” . Whenever we tried to make a sly remark about the car, she would not tolerate it. She always urged us not to say anything bad about “Paulchen”. Apart from a few little dents, “Paulchen” is still okay, good for a drive in our surrounds.

I think we reached Berry on Saturday at around 11am. We were lucky to find a parking spot straight away right in front of the French Bakery Restaurant.

.

Another view of our parking spot. To the right we noticed a beautiful cottage

We thought this cottage looks lovely.

We thought this cottage looks lovely.

The Restaurant is next to the cute little cottage.

The Restaurant is next to the cute little cottage.

The restaurant was originally a barn. It was cuddly warm with a heater switched on.

RIMG1878

Soon our coffee was served in big cups.  The pram in the background was a joy to watch it kept bouncing up and down the way a cradle would.

Soon our coffee was served in big cups.
The pram in the background was a joy to watch. It kept bouncing like a cradle!

RIMG1880

And yes we had Eggs Florentine and Eggs Benedict on sourdough bread with hollandaise sauce.

RIMG1881

RIMG1882

The couple with the baby left the restaurant about the same time we did.

The couple with the baby left the restaurant about the same time we did.

RIMG1891 (2)

I took a picture of Peter before I sat in the car.

I took a picture of Peter before sitting in the car.

This picture is taken through the wet windscreen of the car.

This picture is taken through the wet windscreen of the car.

There must have been a little bit of drizzle while we had been sitting in the restaurant.

There must have been a little bit of drizzle while we had been sitting in the restaurant.

After our beautiful meal we felt energised to go for a walk through town. The restaurant had been filling up while we were in there. We noticed people had to queue up for seats and parking spots in the street might soon be getting scarce. I urged Peter to drive to the other end of town where we could probably find a parking spot not too far away from the street where all the shops are. We actually were able to park the car somewhere else without any problem. Our walk along the shops could begin!

RIMG1894

RIMG1895

RIMG1896

RIMG1897

RIMG1898

RIMG1902

RIMG1905

RIMG1906

RIMG1907

RIMG1907 (2)

RIMG1908

RIMG1909

RIMG1910

RIMG1911

RIMG1912

RIMG1913

RIMG1914

RIMG1916

RIMG1917

RIMG1918

RIMG1919

RIMG1920

RIMG1921

RIMG1922

This is enough window shopping for today. There are still more pictures to come in my next post!

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 292 other followers