Game Theory, the Internet of Things and 5G Networks: … books.google.com.au › books

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=AruXDwAAQBAJ&pg=PA80&lpg=PA80&dq=TIT+The+Internet+of+Things&source=bl&ots=RlgbU-v-ru&sig=ACfU3U3jqD6Aum7SMgqk4tGyz1apykN7rQ&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiCurP9v5jpAhWkxTgGHcxOCLUQ6AEwEHoECAoQAQ#v=onepage&q=TIT%20The%20Internet%20of%20Things&f=false

Game Theory, the Internet of Things and 5G Networks: …

books.google.com.au › books
Josephina Antoniou – 2019 – ‎Technology & Engineering

… combinations (1st simulation Rec. node payoffs Sending node strategies set) Rec. node strategies Tit-for-tat Cheat&return Grim 793.14 4.42 Cheat&leave 6.62 …

Big Farms Make Big Flu

Book Details

Dispatches on Influenza, Agribusiness, and the Nature of Science

by Rob Wallace

Published by: Monthly Review Press

400 pages, 6.00 x 9.00 in

  • PAPERBACK
  • ISBN: 9781583675892
  • PUBLISHED: JUNE 2016

$24.00

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  • HARDCOVER
  • ISBN: 9781583675908
  • PUBLISHED: JUNE 2016

$89.00

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Thanks to breakthroughs in production and food science, agribusiness has been able to devise new ways to grow more food and get it more places more quickly. There is no shortage of news items on hundreds of thousands of hybrid poultry – each animal genetically identical to the next – packed together in megabarns, grown out in a matter of months, then slaughtered, processed and shipped to the other side of the globe. Less well known are the deadly pathogens mutating in, and emerging out of, these specialized agro-environments. In fact, many of the most dangerous new diseases in humans can be traced back to such food systems, among them Campylobacter, Nipah virus, Q fever, hepatitis E, and a variety of novel influenza variants.

Agribusiness has known for decades that packing thousands of birds or livestock together results in a monoculture that selects for such disease. But market economics doesn’t punish the companies for growing Big Flu – it punishes animals, the environment, consumers, and contract farmers. Alongside growing profits, diseases are permitted to emerge, evolve, and spread with little check. “That is,” writes evolutionary biologist Rob Wallace, “it pays to produce a pathogen that could kill a billion people.”

In Big Farms Make Big Flu, a collection of dispatches by turns harrowing and thought-provoking, Wallace tracks the ways influenza and other pathogens emerge from an agriculture controlled by multinational corporations. Wallace details, with a precise and radical wit, the latest in the science of agricultural epidemiology, while at the same time juxtaposing ghastly phenomena such as attempts at producing featherless chickens, microbial time travel, and neoliberal Ebola. Wallace also offers sensible alternatives to lethal agribusiness. Some, such as farming cooperatives, integrated pathogen management, and mixed crop-livestock systems, are already in practice off the agribusiness grid.

While many books cover facets of food or outbreaks, Wallace’s collection appears the first to explore infectious disease, agriculture, economics and the nature of science together. Big Farms Make Big Flu integrates the political economies of disease and science to derive a new understanding of the evolution of infections. Highly capitalized agriculture may be farming pathogens as much as chickens or corn.

THE LUCK OF POLITICS: TRUE TALES OF DISASTER AND OUTRAGEOUS FORTUNE Andrew Leigh

THE LUCK OF POLITICS: TRUE TALES OF DISASTER AND OUTRAGEOUS FORTUNE

https://www.dymocks.com.au/book/the-luck-of-politics-true-tales-of-disaster-and-outrageous-fortune-by-andrew-leigh-9781863957557

“A delightful look at chance and outrageous fortune. In 1968, John Howard missed out on winning the state seat of Drummoyne by just 420 votes. Howard reflects- ‘I think back how fortunate I was to have lost.’ It left him free to stand for a safe federal seat in 1974 and become one of Australia’s longest-serving prime ministers. In The Luck of Politics, Andrew Leigh weaves together numbers and stories to show the many ways luck can change the course of political events. This is a book full of fascinating facts and intriguing findings. Why is politics more like poker than chess? Does the length of your surname affect your political prospects? What about your gender? From Winston Churchill to George Bush, Margaret Thatcher to Paul Keating, this book will persuade you that luck shapes politics – and that maybe, just maybe, we should avoid the temptation to revere the winners and revile the losers. ‘Andrew Leigh takes the simplest idea there is – luck – and threatens to remake your basic understanding of politics with it. Then he succeeds. Lucky for us.’ Waleed Aly ‘It’s rare to find a politician prepared to acknowledge the role of luck – sheer chance – in political success and failure. Andrew Leigh doesn’t just acknowledge it, he interrogates it, using fascinating historical anecdotes to illustrate his tale.’ Lenore Taylor”

Andrew Leigh

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Dr Andrew Leigh
Andrew Leigh 2017.jpg

Leigh in 2017
Member of the Australian Parliament
for Fenner
Assumed office
2 July 2016
Preceded by New seat
Member of the Australian Parliament
for Fraser
In office
21 August 2010 – 2 July 2016
Preceded by Bob McMullan
Succeeded by Division abolished
Personal details
Born
Andrew Keith Leigh

3 August 1972 (age 47)
Sydney, Australia

Nationality Australian
Political party Australian Labor Party
Spouse(s) Gweneth
Children 3 sons
Residence Canberra, Australia
Alma mater University of Sydney
Harvard Kennedy School
Occupation Politician
Profession Lawyer, academic, political adviser
Website andrewleigh.com

Andrew Keith Leigh (born 3 August 1972) is an Australian politician, author, and former professor of economics at the Australian National University. He has been a Labor member of the Australian House of Representatives since 2010 representing the seat of Fraser until 2016 and Fenner thereafter. He briefly served as the Parliamentary Secretary to Prime Minister Julia Gillard in 2013 and then served as Shadow Assistant Treasurer and Shadow Minister for Competition from 2013 to 2019. Leigh is not a member of any factions of the Labor Party.

Only Love Remains: Dancing at the Edge of Extinction

“The science is clear: Homo sapiens teeters on the brink of extinction. Industrial civilization is an omnicidal heat engine, yet terminating civilization heats the planet even faster in an outcome termed the McPherson Paradox. Only Love Remains: Dancing on the Edge of Extinction describes a way forward in light of our terminal diagnosis. In this book, professor emeritus of conservation biology Guy McPherson describes how we can proceed with urgency in the face of habitat loss for our species. While describing the evidence underlying human extinction within a few years, McPherson also provides an urgent and reasoned response to this prognosis.”

It’s not too late to stem climate change. But we have no more time to waste.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/outlook/its-not-too-late-to-stem-climate-change-but-we-have-no-more-time-to-waste/2019/04/26/8406aa64-525b-11e9-88a1-ed346f0ec94f_story.html

April 26

Meara Sharma writes about culture and the environment.

Author and environmentalist Bill McKibben wrote 30 years ago, “The End of Nature” This is latest book: “Falter: Has the Human Game Begun to Play Itself Out?