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BOOK REVIEW|Margaret Atwood on What ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ Means in the Age of Trump

15 Jul

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/10/books/review/margaret-atwood-handmaids-tale-age-of-trump.html

Books by Australian Author Liane Moriarty

18 Jun

I just copied a review of a book by Liane Moriarty and published it here:

https://auntyuta.com/2017/06/18/what-alice-forgot-by-liane-moriarty/

In the review it was said that the novel “What Alice Forgot” is going to be made into a movie to be released in 2017. I have already read this novel and I do hope that I soon may be able to see this movie, when it comes out this year.

Apparently there are also some other books by Liane Moriarty that might be made into movies:

https://www.popsugar.com.au/celebrity/What-Other-Liane-Moriarty-Books-Being-Made-Movies-43410408#photo-43410406

So far the only other book by Liane Moriarty that I’ve read is:

Truly Madly Guilty

The following is taken from a review about Truly Madly Guilty:

“IF ONLY THEY’D SAID NO…

Clementine is haunted by regret. It was just a barbeque. They didn’t even know their hosts that well, they were friends of friends. They could so easily have said no.

But she and her husband Sam said yes, and now they can never change what they did and didn’t do that Sunday afternoon.

Six responsible adults. Three cute kids. One playful dog. It’s an ordinary weekend in the suburbs. What could possibly go wrong?

Marriage, sex, parenthood and friendship: Liane Moriarty takes these elements of our lives and shows us how guilt can expose the fault lines in any relationship, and it is not until we appreciate the fragility of life that we can truly value what we have.”

You find the review here:

https://www.qbd.com.au/truly-madly-guilty/liane-moriarty/9781925481396/

In both books by Liane Moriarty that I have read so far, Liane depicts people that live in contemporary Sydney. What she writes about the characters’ Australian lifestyle seems very true to me. It makes me think about the way we live and what our priorities are. I am quite a bit older now than most of Liane’s characters. And I am a migrant to Australia who settled here nearly sixty years ago. As migrants my family had overall somewhat different lifestyle experiences from Liane’s characters on the North shore of Sydney. Still, a lot of the problems she describes in her books, problems that families may come up with, seem to be universal. I think the author herself is a young married woman with two young children. She would know first hand how demanding but also joyful marriage and the raising of young children usually is.  Often in a young marriage there is a lack of time to do the things together that bind together. And all too often the stresses of modern life may lead to divorce and great upheaval for the children.

 

 

“What Alice Forgot” by Liane Moriarty

18 Jun

I, Uta, have already read the book and agree, that it is “infectiously good” and that this novel may be in my head months after I have finished reading it. So I am here  going to copy what was published last year in the Huffington Post about this book “What Alice Forgot” by Australian author Liane Moriarty. This copied review was written by Julia Naughton. While reading this book, I thought all the time that it is very suitable for being made into a movie. I hope, I’ll soon have a chance to see the movie. 

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com.au/2016/06/08/quick-read-these-books-before-the-movie-comes-out_a_21392007/

Here now is the copy taken from the above link:

“You mean, you haven’t read the book?!”

09/06/2016 11:37 AM AEST | Updated 15/07/2016 12:53 PM AEST

​The anticipation of waiting for the film release of a book you cherish can sometimes be too much.

What if they cast the protagonist with an actor you hate? Or worse, they change the ending?

Blame it on the two-hour time limit or the soulless pursuit of box office cred, changing the plot happens all the time and sometimes, it’s really not fair.

The good news? These books are not only qualified to be on your cherished list, but you’ll only have to wait a few months for the movie, one year at most.

Sadly, we can’t vouch for how true they’ll stay to the book, but as far as we can tell, the actors already confirmed get our tick of approval.

What Alice Forgot

Amy Einhorn Books

By Liane Moriarty

Movie release: 2017

Imagine if you woke up one day only to realise you’d lost a big chunk of your memory from the past decade? Set in Sydney’s Northern Beaches, Liane Moriarty’s What Alice Forgot centres around Alice, whose last memory was being pregnant with her first child and completely head over heels in love with her husband, Nick. Now, years later Nick looks at her with disdain, she’s lost contact with her sister (who is going through her own infertility struggles) and is lost as to where it all went wrong. With hopeful vulnerability, Alice, who is living in the mind of her 29-year-old self surprises her husband, kids and later, even herself as she desperately tries to salvage her marriage. Infectiously good, this novel will be in your head months after you’ve finished it.

 

Uta’s May 2017 Diary

30 May

 

 

DSCN2852

A view from Peter’s hospital window

 

“The Dry” by Jane Harper. I was able to get this novel from the library and started reading it last week on Wednesday when Peter had his treatment day in Wollongong Hospital. Last weekend I finished reading this book in between sleeping a lot. I needed a lot of extra rest for I had a tummy upset. Still, it was good that I could use the resting time to finish reading “The Dry”. I was really interested to find out how this crime novel would end. It is a first novel by Australian author Jane Harper. The novel is set in a small country town in outback very dry and hot Victoria. A family is being murdered during the hot summer month of February. Who is the murderer? I thought there were very interesting clues and characters in this novel. After a while I just could not put it down anymore.

My tummy ache had already started early in the morning last Saturday. But this was the day when we had planned lunch with our friends at the club’s Treasure Court Restaurant. I actually managed to eat my vegetables with ginger/shallot sauce and boiled rice.

DSCN2856

These vegetable were very crisp and fresh. I think this sort of meal was just the right thing for me to eat on that day.

Yesterday, Monday, I felt much better. But to be on the safe side, I stayed home all day. Today was different. Peter and I left early in the morning to go to Warrawong to see a movie in the GALA CINEMA. Our choice to see was

VICEROY’S HOUSE, a movie about the partition of India in 1947.

 

In the review by

  • Paul Byrnes

    it is said towards the end:

” . . .  This last bit is where Chadha may have taken liberties. She relies on a book by former Indian diplomat Narendra Singh Sarila, a junior member of Mountbatten’s staff. Sarila contends that Churchill decided two years earlier that partition was necessary to ensure that a newly created Pakistan would become a strong bulwark against the USSR, thus protecting the Middle East oilfields. . . . ”

http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/movies/viceroys-house-review-entertaining-but-misleading-20170517-gw6og6.html

I wonder now, whether film director Chadha has taken liberties or not.

 

Jonathan Franzen’s ‘Purity’

12 Feb

 

I googled today some reviews of this book.
The links to the two reviews at the top I publish to show how much two reviews about the same book can actually differ.

My thoughts on reading this book:

I am now more than halfway through Jonathan Franzen’s “Purity”.
I would agree that for me this book is not all that easy one to read. There are pages with a lot of information which at times I find rather difficult to digest and remember. However I can sense that all the information provided shows a lot about our modern world and how people in it are affected. Other sections in the book are very easy to read and show, how complicated ordinary lives can become in our modern world. I like being able to read parts of the book for a few hours in one go. Making it possible to read for an extended time, the book seems to be getting more and more interesting. I can’t wait to find out more about its characters!

An Amazon Book: Ritual and its Consequences

21 May

http://www.amazon.com/Ritual-Its-Consequences-Limits-Sincerity/dp/0195336011/ref=la_B001KHQ65U_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1463773318&sr=1-2

Ritual and Its Consequences: An Essay on the Limits of Sincerity 1st Edition
by Adam B. Seligman (Author), Robert P. Weller (Author), Michael J. Puett (Author), Simon (Author)

Going to the above link I found this interesting write-up:

“This pioneering, interdisciplinary work shows how rituals allow us to live in a perennially imperfect world. Drawing on a variety of cultural settings, the authors utilize psychoanalytic and anthropological perspectives to describe how ritual–like play–creates “as if” worlds, rooted in the imaginative capacity of the human mind to create a subjunctive universe. The ability to cross between imagined worlds is central to the human capacity for empathy. Ritual, they claim, defines the boundaries of these imagined worlds, including those of empathy and other realms of human creativity, such as music, architecture and literature.

The authors juxtapose this ritual orientation to a “sincere” search for unity and wholeness. The sincere world sees fragmentation and incoherence as signs of inauthenticity that must be overcome. Our modern world has accepted the sincere viewpoint at the expense of ritual, dismissing ritual as mere convention. In response, the authors show how the conventions of ritual allow us to live together in a broken world. Ritual is work, endless work. But it is among the most important things that we humans do.”

Here are some more editorial Reviews:

“In this whirligig world we do not know what to do apart from the done thing. Ritual and courtesy are, in contemporary parlance, suspect activities surplus to requirements. Like conformity, ritual attracts the adjectives ‘mere,’ ‘meaningless,’ ‘external,’ ’empty’ and ‘inauthentic.’ This book brilliantly expounds the creative potential and the necessity of ritual, and exposes the destructive possibilities of sincerity. It could be seen as part of a Jewish riposte to Christianity or a Confucian one to the Enlightenment, but Catholics and members of enclosed orders will like it too. Everybody should read it, especially American Protestants and post-Protestant secularists who suffer more than most from the ills of sincerity.” –David Martin, Emeritus Professor of Sociology, London School of Economics

“In this whirligig world we do not know what to do apart from the done thing. Ritual and courtesy are, in contemporary parlance, suspect activities surplus to requirements. Like conformity, ritual attracts the adjectives ‘mere,’ ‘meaningless,’ ‘external,’ ’empty’ and ‘inauthentic.’ This book brilliantly expounds the creative potential and the necessity of ritual, and exposes the destructive possibilities of sincerity. It could be seen as part of a Jewish riposte to Christianity or a Confucian one to the Enlightenment, but Catholics and members of enclosed orders will like it too. Everybody should read it, especially American Protestants and post-Protestant secularists who suffer more than most from the ills of sincerity.” –David Martin, Emeritus Professor of Sociology, London School of Economics

“An enormously important and paradigm-changing book. The audacity of its scope is refreshing–a turn to grand theory in an academic culture whose trend is to say more and more and less and less.”Common Knowledge

“…A new, interesting, and very fruitful approach towards understanding and using the concept of ‘ritual.'”–Religion

About the Authors
Adam B. Seligman is Professor of Religion and Research Associate at the Institute for Culture, Religion, and World Affairs at Boston University. Robert P. Weller is Professor and Chair of the Department of Anthropology and Research Associate at the Institute for Culture, Religion, and World Affairs at Boston University. Michael J. Puett is Professor of Chinese History at Harvard University. Bennett Simon is Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and Training and Supervising Analyst at Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute

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The Path: What Chinese Philosophers Can Teach Us About the Good Life
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Uta’s Diary, Tuesday, 12th April 2016

12 Apr

http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/abc-qa-germaine-greer-slams-claim-extreme-jealousy-causes-domestic-violence-20160412-go3xri.html

This link is about last night’s Q&A program. This program is on late at night, a bit too late for Peter and myself.  We decided we’re going to watch it  today. Luckily Peter could record this program.

I am very much looking forward to watch it, especially with Germaine Greer in the panel. Apparently there is some talk about domestic violence. For sure, there would have to be said a lot about this subject!

 

http://www.amazon.com/Heads-Tails-Winner-Blended-Australian-ebook/dp/B00O7UJ2PI/ref=sr_1_2?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1460411770&sr=1-2&refinements=p_27%3ABronwyn+Vanzino

Heads or Tails: Being a Winner in the Blended Australian FamilyKindle Edition

Kindle Edition

Here follows what Kindle says about this novel:

“Novel about a young koori man finding his identity in the emerging multiculturalism of Australia in the 1980s. The storyline focuses on a fictitious young koori policeman, James Finley (Fin). A born leader, Fin tries to help a man wrongly imprisoned. Anger at injustice threatens to devour him in the case and in his unusual personal life. He battles with finding his place in the early multiculturalism of Australia during the 1980s, when many want to use him for their own purposes. Fin finds he has to personally change to succeed in relationships and learns that the road to reconciliation is not as straightforward as many tell him it is, but he believes he can discover success and happiness – on his own terms – and has to learn to play by the rules in the pursuit of justice.”

I have read this novel on KindleI would like to have the paperback. However it seems not to be available any more. This novel was dealing with very interesting subjects. What is said about Fin in the above write up says it very well: This young koori man “has to learn to play by the rules in the pursuit of justice.”  

This novel is of course fictional. But I would like very much that more people in our society were concerned about the pursuit of justice. This koori policeman is a good example how multiculturalism can work in our society. The book shows how it can be quite a struggle for some people to find out about themselves and where they fit in. This does not only apply to indigenous people but also to migrants from different cultures.

Last but not least, here is a link to a blog with some excellent photos about cooking:

https://42weimar42.wordpress.com/