FUTURE DEVELOPMENT Stakeholder capitalism arrives at Davos Addisu LashitewTuesday, January 21, 2020

Stakeholder capitalism arrives at Davos

“The 2020 annual meeting of the World Economic Forum opens this week with the theme of “Stakeholders for a Cohesive and Sustainable World.” More than 3,000 global leaders, including 53 heads of state, will convene in the resort town of Davos on the Swiss Alpine to deliberate on pathways to “stakeholder capitalism.”

GLOBAL RISKS REPORT 2020

https://www.oliverwyman.com/our-expertise/insights/2020/jan/globalrisks2020.html?utm_source=exacttarget&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=risk-report

“Economic and political polarization will intensify, as collaboration is needed more than ever to respond to severe threats to climate, public health, and technology systems.”

“The Global Risks Report 2020 presents the major risks the world will be facing in the coming year. It stresses the need for a multistakeholder approach to addressing the world’s greatest challenges, and comes ahead of the World Economic Forum’s 50th Annual Meeting in Davos-Klosters, where the focus is Stakeholders for a Cohesive and Sustainable World.

Speakers: Borge Brende, President, World Economic Forum Mirek Dusek, Deputy Head of the Centre for Geopolitical & Regional Affairs, World Economic Forum John Drzik, President, Global Risk and Digital, Marsh Peter Giger, Group Chief Risk Officer,

Zurich Insurance Group Emily Farnwoth, Head of Climate Change Initiatives,

World Economic Forum Moderated by: Adrian Monck, Managing Director, Head of Public Engagement The World Economic Forum is the International Organization for Public-Private Cooperation. The Forum engages the foremost political, business, cultural and other leaders of society to shape global, regional and industry agendas. We believe that progress happens by bringing together people from all walks of life who have the drive and the influence to make positive change.”

Concentration Camp Survivors

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-12-29/esther-perel-on-the-erotic/11769448

https://www.abc.net.au/radio/programs/conversations/esther-perel/11170108

When Esther was a teenager she was voraciously curious about human behaviour.

She thought she’d become a journalist or a translator, but instead she grew up to become the world’s most famous contemporary psychotherapist.

Esther became known around the world after the release of her podcast “Where Should We Begin?” in which she counsels real-life couples who are on the brink of marital breakdown.

In her sessions she’s often exploring the tension between the need for security in a relationship, and the need for some distance and a sense of adventure, to keep the spark alive.

Esther says when you choose a partner you choose a story, and by doing so, you’re often recruited for a part you never expected to play.

Further information

The State of Affairs: Rethinking Infidelity is published by Yellow Kite Books

Listen to the podcast Where Should We Begin?

Duration: 52min 34sec

Broadcast: 
Guests

 

December Writing Challenge/ Prompts:

https://patchworkmomma.wordpress.com/manifest20-prompts/

  1. Choose one word which you would like to embody during 2020 as a sort of theme for the year. How would you like to see this word manifest in your life?
  2. Who inspired you in 2019? Why? What gifts did they give you? How will you carry these forward in 2020?
  3. What made you feel joyful in 2019? What steps can you take to create more joyful moments in the coming year?
  4. What goals did you accomplish in 2019 that you’re proud of? How will your achievement continue to benefit you or others in the future?
  5. What musical discovery did you make this year? Share a memory involving music or tell us what artist or song would feature on the soundtrack of your life for 2019?
  6. What surprised you in 2019

 

Today I want to write about Nr.  6!

So, what surprised me in 2019?

Did it surprise me that Greta Thunberg continued to get so much media attention? She is a very determined young woman, only sixteen, but she stuck it out, did not hesitate to live by her principles. To find supporters that made it possible for her to travel for instance by boat to the Americas and back again. Well, this was quite an achievement!

Yes, in a way it did surprise me that Greta was able to get such an enormous support!

I want to keep it brief. So I only want to mention, that I find it surprising that so many people these days are able to live into their eighties or nineties. I would be surprised, if Peter and I were able to make it to the nineties! Somehow, I cannot quite imagine it. I am surprised about every year that we are still alive.

Just recently I was surprised that independent Senator Jacqui Lambie voted with the government to repeal the medevac bill. It does not seem to make sense, not at all.

Here is an interesting link to an article about the repeal bill:

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-12-05/medevac-repeal-bill-scott-morrison-new-zealand-png-nauru/11765456

Australia is at present in the grip of enormous draught as well as disastrous bushfires with soaring temperatures and extremely strong winds. The government says, this is quite normal for Australia. A lot of people here want to talk about it why there is so much climate change, but the government says there is no need to talk about it or to do something about it. Am I surprised that our government acts this way? No, not at all. The Australian voters voted the present government in. It surprised me at the time. And I’ll be still more surprised, should they be voted in again at the next election.

 

 

 

 

 

1

Smartphones creating generational and income divide

 

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-11-18/digital-divide-australia-inequality-access-to-technology/11627020

Updated 

Desmond White leads a very modern life, riding his bike around inner-city Newcastle, where he lives on his own in a fifth-storey apartment overlooking the wharf.

Key points:

  • The Australia Talks survey found 96 per cent of Australians use a smartphone
  • 62 per cent of Australians spend between one and six hours a day on their devices, the survey found
  • Most people think technology is making life better in Australia

But the 93-year-old was unimpressed when he recently became the owner of an iPhone.

“I had one of the old traditional phones, which was misbehaving. All callers — and I’ve got a lot of callers — would say ‘what’s up with your phone, what’s wrong with your phone?'” he said.

Optus offered Mr White a new phone and he agreed, but he was surprised to find it was an iPhone that arrived in the mail.

“I was expecting one like the old-fashioned stuff,” he said.

Suddenly, Mr White, who once presided over a successful tyre business, found himself unable to perform the previously simple task of making a phone call.

“Everybody promised — I’ve got grandkids and whatnot — to show me what to do with it,” he said.

With most of his family outside of the Newcastle area, Mr White turned to a computer club for older Novocastrians.

“I somehow managed to be able to make a call, and of course receive one … but it would be nice if I could do ever so much more, because I know it has so much to offer,” Mr White said.

“Some of them feel a little bit intimidated, feel a little bit upset because the world is changing so fast.

“It is scary, a lot of them are fearful.”

Tutors at the club say where once people would come in curious to explore this new frontier, they are now coming in because they have no choice.

With Australia moving towards a cashless economy, many people have found themselves caught out, unable to use internet banking.

Ms Keen said the generational gap was particularly glaring when younger people tried to help out.

“They [older people] say, ‘oh I asked my son, or my daughter or my grandson or granddaughter … and they say, ‘oh you do this, this and this, press this button, do that, that’s how you do it’,” she said.

“The person sitting there who hasn’t understood the vast difference in the language and all the terminology, and hasn’t seen that before, is suddenly thrown and they’re thinking, ‘I have no idea what that person did’.

“They go to replicate it later and they have no idea.”

Has technology made life better?

It has been more than a decade since Australians were introduced to smartphones, and the ABC’s Australia Talks survey found 96 per cent of people in the country now own one.

Not surprisingly though, the data shows the older you get, the less likely you are to have one.”

I, Uta, copied the above. This new technology I find very scary. I get the creeps when I am bombarded with terms like ‘the cashless society’! I am not 93 yet, I am ‘only’ 85. But I have very poor vision. The idea that in future I  may have to use an iPhone does scare me no end. My husband Peter is very close to my age. However, he knows how to use a smartphone and keeps in touch with the children and he also accesses all the information about the children that is available on Facebook. He spends many hours a day on these gadgets. I find it very helpful that he can always give me information about family and friends. So far it worked out all right that I have to rely on Peter for all this information. I think to have to spend hours and hours on these gadgets to eventually get some valuable information is not a very efficent way to get to the news that is important to me. I think I prefer to keep in touch via email or a ‘normal’ phone call if person to person contact is not possible. So far I have been lucky in that person to person contact has still been possible a lot of the time. And occasionally I still get some beautiful emails! And I like the World Wide Web and WordPress! 

“Tutors at the club say where once people would come in curious to explore this new frontier, they are now coming in because they have no choice.”

So this is what the tutors say! NO JOICE? I hope this is not true for me. I just do not feel like going to that ‘new frontier’ and spending the last bit of time that may be left to me with torturing my brain with new things that I feel I should not have to learn at this stage of my life!! Please understand, I am willing to adapt as much as possible to new things that are necessary for instance to cope with climate change, but somehow I feel that new frontier technology I should not have to be confronted with . . . .

 

 

ABC announces probe into feminist Q&A episode after audience complaints

https://www.sbs.com.au/news/abc-announces-probe-into-feminist-q-a-episode-after-audience-complaints?cid=trending

Monday night's Q&A panel with guest host Fran Kelly.
Monday night’s Q&A panel with guest host Fran Kelly. Source: ABC

Minister for Communications Paul Fletcher said the decision to investigate Monday night’s Q&A program was “appropriate”.

UPDATED

“The ABC will investigate whether Monday night’s episode of Q&A breached editorial standards after receiving several audience complaints about the language and ideas expressed by the panel.

The entirely non-male panel featured high-profile feminists – Egyptian-American writer Mona Eltahawy, Indigenous screenwriter Nayuka Gorrie, journalist Jess Hill, business leader Hana Assafiri and anti-ageism campaigner Ashton Applewhite – ahead of this weekend’s Broadside Festival, hosted by the Wheeler Centre.

ABC Managing Director David Anderson said the intention of the panel was to “present challenging ideas from high-profile feminists” but he acknowledged the program was “provocative in regard to the language used and some of the views presented”.

.  .  .  .

 

Sydney Metro in meltdown

Hundreds of Sydney Metro passengers were ordered off trains during the height of Thursday morning’s peak hour services after mechanical problems on a train at North Ryde caused serious delays.

Commuters reported being left stuck for up to 20 minutes on stationary trains after 8am and being told to disembark and wait for buses.

Sydney Metro commuters face delays

Sydney Metro commuters face delays

Port Augusta woman charged with murder

Sydney Metro commuters face delays

Tania Matin said she was told via an announcement to get off the train at Macquarie University and catch a bus, but nobody was there to direct passengers and she returned to the station after waiting 15 minutes.

She was then able to board a train, but ordered off again at Macquarie Park, where she was greeted by a line of “thousands” waiting for buses. After another 20 minutes, she gave up and took a metro train back to Epping.

Ms Matin said she was angry “not at the mechanical failure… but lack of communication, mismanagement and lack of skill to control the huge crowd [at peak hour]”.

Services on the network returned to normal about 11am.

It’s been a poor week for the Sydney Metro, which also had a train break down at Chatswood on Wednesday. On Tuesday, a fire alarm prompted services to skip Macquarie Park.

The network has faced frequent technical problems since its opening in May.

Jenny Noyes

Jenny Noyes is a journalist at the Sydney Morning Herald. She was previously a writer and editor at Daily Life.