EAST TURKISTAN

Brief History

https://www.uyghurcongress.org/en/east-turkestan-2/

East Turkistan, also known as the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of China, lies in the very heart of Asia. Situated along the fabled ancient Silk Road, it has been a prominent centertur of commerce for more than 2,000 years. The land of East Turkistan gave birth to many great civilizations and at various points in history has been a cradle of scholarship, culture and power.

The current territorial size of East Turkistan is 1.82 million square kilometers. The neighboring Chinese province annexed part of the territory as a result of the Chinese communist invasion of 1949.

East Turkistan borders China and Mongolia to the east, Russia to the north, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Afghanistan, Pakistan and India to the west, and Tibet to the south.

East Turkistan has a rich history and a diverse geography. It has grand deserts, magnificent mountains, and beautiful rivers, grasslands and forests.

The Manchu Invasion

The independent Uyghur Kingdom in East Turkistan — the Seyyid Kingdom, also known as Yarkent Kingdom — was invaded by the Manchu rulers of China in 1759 who annexed East Turkistan into their empire. The Manchus ruled East Turkistan as a military colony from 1759 to 1862. During this period, the Uyghurs and other peoples of East Turkistan valiantly opposed the foreign rule in their land. They revolted 42 times against Manchu rule with the purpose of regaining their independence. The Manchu were finally expelled in 1864 and Uyghurs established Yetteshahar State. However, the independence was short lived, Manchus invaded East Turkistan again in 1876. After eight years of bloody war, the Manchu Empire formally annexed East Turkistan into its territories and renamed it “Xinjiang” (meaning “New Territory”) on November 18, 1884.

Chinese Rule in East Turkistan

After the Chinese Nationalists overthrew the Manchu Empire in 1911, East Turkistan fell under the rule of warlords of Chinese ethnicity who came to dominate provincial administration in the later years of the Manchu Empire. The Chinese central government had little control over East Turkistan during this period. The Uyghurs, who wanted to free themselves from foreign domination, staged numerous uprisings against Chinese rule, and twice (in 1933 and in 1944) succeeded in setting up an independent East Turkistan Republic (ETR). However, these independent republics were overthrown by the military intervention and political intrigue of the Soviet Union.

In October of 1949, the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) troops marched into East Turkistan, effectively ending the ETR. The Chinese communists established the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region in the territory of East Turkistan.

The Chinese communist reign in East Turkistan can be considered the darkest chapter in the history of the Uyghurs and East Turkistan. Under the current conditions, the very existence of the Uyghur nation is under threat. The Chinese communist government has been carrying out a vicious campaign against Uyghurs and other indigenous people of East Turkistan in order to permanently annex the lands of East Turkistan.

Despite all the brutal and destructive campaigns by the Chinese government against their identity and existence, the Uyghurs and other indigenous peoples of East Turkistan refuse to be subjugated by China and keep carrying the torch of resistance against Chinese occupation, handed down to them by their ancestors.

People

East Turkistan is the homeland of the Turkic speaking Uyghurs and other Central Asian peoples such as Kazakhs, Kyrgyz, Uzbeks, Tatars and Tajiks.

According to latest Chinese census of 2010, the current population of East Turkistan is 21.81 million, including 8.75 million ethnic Han Chinese (40,1%), who illegally settled in East Turkistan after 1949 (the ethnic Han Chinese numbered 200,000 in 1949). The Uyghurs make up at least 11 million of the population, although the 2002 census listed their number as around 10.2 million and still constitute the majority of East Turkistan. However, the composition of the population shifts more and more in favor of the Han Chinese, turning the Uyghurs into strangers in their own land. However, Uyghur sources put the real population of Uyghurs around 20 million.

East Turkistan is located beyond the logical boundary of China, the Great Wall. Historically and culturally, East Turkistan is part of Central Asia, not of China. The people of East Turkistan are not Chinese; they are Turks of Central Asia.

Records show that the Uyghurs have a history of more than 4,000 years in East Turkistan.

Throughout the history, independent states established by the ancestors of the Uyghurs and other indigenous peoples thrived and prospered in the lands of East tTurkistan. Situated along a section of the legendary Silk Road, Uyghurs played an important role in cultural exchanges between East and West and developed a unique culture and civilization of their own.

In their early history, the Uyghurs, like most of the other Turkic peoples of Central Asia, believed in Shamanism, Manichaeism and Buddhism. Starting from the 1st century AD and until the arrival of Islam, East Turkistan became one of the great centers of Buddhist civilization.

The conversion to Islam began when contacts between Uyghurs and Muslims started at the beginning of the 9th century. During the reign of the Karahanidin kings, the Islamization of Uyghur society accelerated. Kashgar, the capital of the Karahadin Kingdom, quickly became one of the major learning centers of Islam. The arts, sciences, music and literature flourished as Islamic religious institutions nurtured the pursuit of an advanced culture. In this period, hundreds of world-renowned Uyghur scholars emerged. Thousands of valuable books were written. Among these works, the Uyghur scholar Yusup Has Hajip’s book, Kutadku Bilig (The knowledge for Happiness, 1069-1070) and Mahmud Kashgar’s Divan-I Lugat-it Turk (a dictionary of Turk language) are most influential.

Geography

East Turkistan covers an area of 1.82 million square kilometers, which is twice as large as the Republic of Turkey or four times as large as the American state of California. More than 43 percent of this area is covered by deserts and another 40 percent is covered by mountain ranges.

This huge land is charcterized mainly by two basins bounded by three mountain ranges. The two basins are the Tarim Basin in the south, which measures 530,000 square kilometers, and the Junggar Basin in the north, which covers an area of 304,200 square kilometers. The Tarim Basin contains one of the largest deserts in the world — the Taklamakan desert. The Junggar basin contains the Kurbantunggut desert.

Tengritagh mountain range (Heavenly mountain) crosses the central part of East Turkistan, dividing the country into south and north. Within East Turkistan, the Tengritagh mountain range is 1,700 kilometers long and 250-300 kilometers wide. Altay mountain range in the north forms the border of East Turkistan with Mongolia, Russia and Kazakhstan. Its section within East Turkistan is 400 kilometers long. The Kunlun mountain in the south forms the the border between East Turkistan and Tibet.

The most important rivers are the Tarim River (2,137 km long), traversing almost the whole length of the southern part of East Turkistan and emptzing into the desert; the Ili River flows west to Kazakhstan and into Lake Balqash; the Irtish River flows northwest out of East Turkistan and into the Arctic Ocean; the Karashaar River flows east from central Tengritagh into Lake Baghrash; the Konche River, starting from the Baghrash lake, originally flowed into Lopnur Lake, but now disappears in the desert long before reaching the lake.

. . . . . .

Lockdown is a wake-up call: time to start aging positively by Rachel McAlpine

That wake-up birthday—a poem

Have you had a wake-up birthday?
Can you barely believe
you’re a certain age
and dread what lies ahead?
Is your future self a blurry screen
or a stereotyped cartoon?
Are you frozen even though you know
exactly what to do?
Do you think it’s too late or too soon?

Now’s the perfect time
to face the facts and get a grip
and get control of your precious life
not because you ought to
but because you can.
Tweak your life and make the best
of your bonus years
and here’s the bottom line:
you’re not dead!

Rachel McAlpine 2020

. . . . .

Thoughts about aging (positive and negative) flourish in lockdown

Clock says 5 to 12 beneath a lockdown cloud and a NEED cloud. is a teachable moment

Lockdown is like a wake-up birthday: time to choose your own old age

I would strongly recommend to go to this post by Rachel McAlpine. It shows that old age can be a beautiful time. How do we prepare for it? How do we live it? Rachel McAlpine has some great thought about what we can do to make good use of old age to the benefit of all society!

HOW DO I WRITE THE DISCUSSION SECTION?

“. . . .

I’m indebted to my colleague Josta Heylingers for pointing me at the literature on functional linguistics. Josta uses this literature to teach people how to write discussion chapters at Auckland University of Technology. To do this, she uses the work of John Swales, and his method of ‘move step analysis’. I touched on this method in my own PhD, and of my PhD students is using move step analysis in her work, so I’ve had to become passingly familiar with the method.

Swales starts by assuming that texts are social things: every reader has been ‘trained’ on what to expect from different kinds of texts. Job applications ‘sound’ different from grant applications, which sound different than a journal article. So readers are familiar with the linguistic ‘moves’ to expect. These linguistic moves are sort of like dance steps that build together to make a socially recognisable text.

Swales’ move step analysis is a way of breaking down the text dance so you can understand which bits go where and how to put them together in an accomplished performance. Think of any dance craze you can name. When I was a teenager, in the 1980s (!) it was ‘The Nutbush‘; by the 1990s it was The Macarena. In case you weren’t there, or don’t remember, here’s a helpful video. It’s worth watching, because it’s delightful, and a good way to understand what move step analysis is:

I’m indebted to my colleague Josta Heylingers for pointing me at the literature on functional linguistics. Josta uses this literature to teach people how to write discussion chapters at Auckland University of Technology. To do this, she uses the work of John Swales, and his method of ‘move step analysis’. I touched on this method in my own PhD, and of my PhD students is using move step analysis in her work, so I’ve had to become passingly familiar with the method.

Swales starts by assuming that texts are social things: every reader has been ‘trained’ on what to expect from different kinds of texts. Job applications ‘sound’ different from grant applications, which sound different than a journal article. So readers are familiar with the linguistic ‘moves’ to expect. These linguistic moves are sort of like dance steps that build together to make a socially recognisable text.

Swales’ move step analysis is a way of breaking down the text dance so you can understand which bits go where and how to put them together in an accomplished performance. Think of any dance craze you can name. When I was a teenager, in the 1980s (!) it was ‘The Nutbush‘; by the 1990s it was The Macarena. In case you weren’t there, or don’t remember, here’s a helpful video. It’s worth watching, because it’s delightful, and a good way to understand what move step analysis is:

I’m indebted to my colleague Josta Heylingers for pointing me at the literature on functional linguistics. Josta uses this literature to teach people how to write discussion chapters at Auckland University of Technology. To do this, she uses the work of John Swales, and his method of ‘move step analysis’. I touched on this method in my own PhD, and of my PhD students is using move step analysis in her work, so I’ve had to become passingly familiar with the method.

Swales starts by assuming that texts are social things: every reader has been ‘trained’ on what to expect from different kinds of texts. Job applications ‘sound’ different from grant applications, which sound different than a journal article. So readers are familiar with the linguistic ‘moves’ to expect. These linguistic moves are sort of like dance steps that build together to make a socially recognisable text.

Swales’ move step analysis is a way of breaking down the text dance so you can understand which bits go where and how to put them together in an accomplished performance. Think of any dance craze you can name. When I was a teenager, in the 1980s (!) it was ‘The Nutbush‘; by the 1990s it was The Macarena. In case you weren’t there, or don’t remember, here’s a helpful video. It’s worth watching, because it’s delightful, and a good way to understand what move step analysis is:

Coronavirus ripped through aged cared homes in the UK, but one managed to avoid disaster

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-08-03/advice-from-a-uk-care-home-that-defied-a-coronavirus-disaster/12509854

By Nick Dole in LondonPosted 45mminutes ago

A man in a glasses and a mask sits with a man wearing glasses, who has his arm around him.
David McGuire (left) runs a care home for the elderly and those with special needs in Kent, and managed to protect all his residents from COVID-19.(Supplied: David McGuire)

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As coronavirus ripped through care homes in the UK, one provider decided to go its own way and ended up saving residents from catastrophe.

Key points:

  • About 20,000 UK care residents died from COVID-19 between March and June
  • One provider locked down homes and refused to take in hospital patients
  • Their homes have not experienced a single case of COVID-19

David McGuire runs the Diagrama Foundation, which cares for elderly and special needs residents in Kent in southern England.

Despite claims from health officials in February that it was “very unlikely” people in care could be infected, Mr McGuire defied the government’s guidelines and locked down his facilities.

It paid off.

While about 20,000 care residents have died with COVID-19 in the UK, none of Mr McGuire’s residents has tested positive.

He now has a message for Australian aged care providers as they confront the deadly spread of COVID-19.For the latest news on the COVID-19 pandemic read our coronavirus live blog.

“Don’t wait for anyone to tell you what to do,” he told the ABC.

The UK care home boss says Australian facilities shouldn’t be afraid to impose lockdowns, even if it seems excessive.

“Act quickly. Follow your gut. If you think what you’re doing is ‘over the top,’ keep doing it.”

How David avoided a coronavirus outbreak

In late February, when there were only a few cases of COVID-19 in the UK, the Government agency Public Health England told care homes not to worry.

“Currently there is no evidence of transmission of COVID-19 in the United Kingdom. There is no need to do anything differently in any care setting at present,” it said.

The advice was updated on March 13, but even then they failed to comprehend the risk.

Homes were simply advised to encourage good hygiene, whilst discouraging visits from guests who were unwell.

A man in a mask stands with his arm around two men as another looks on .
David McGuire locked down his care homes in March, despite some residents being distressed about not seeing their families.(Supplied: David McGuire)

“The message was ‘wash your hands’. That was it. We were in limbo,” David McGuire said.

But Mr McGuire had been speaking regularly with colleagues in Spain, where the virus had already taken hold in care homes.

He couldn’t comprehend the UK’s approach, and so decided to take decisive action.

Read more about coronavirus:

Mr McGuire banned all non-essential visits, meaning his residents could not see their friends and family. Video calls were their only social contact with the outside world.

“I remember some residents crying. It was a difficult decision,” he said.

The government did not order a general lockdown until 11 days later. By that time, the virus was already embedding itself in the nation’s care homes.

Over the weeks that followed, thousands of vulnerable people would die, many without their families by their sides.

‘Abandoned and thrown to the wolves’

Mr McGuire averted an early outbreak, but then the Government tried to transfer hospital patients to his facilities.Aged care in Victoria is looming as a coronavirus disasterBrace for it to get far worse from here. Aged care stands as a looming disaster for the state, after a dramatic growth in infections across a growing list of nursing homes.Read more

Hospitals needed to free up beds for an influx of COVID-19 patients, and in early April official guidance stated that negative tests were not required before a patient could be transferred to a care home.

But Mr McGuire stood his ground, and said he would only accept patients who had tested negative.

“I think that has proved to be right, because some of the people who we stopped … a couple of days later, they [tested] positive,” he said.

There is no way of knowing how many infectious patients were discharged into care homes.

However, figures show that 25,000 patients were transferred from hospitals into English care homes before a routine testing program began on April 16.

Nadra Ahmed, Chair of the National Care Association, said the test results did not come fast enough to prevent contagion.

“There were assurances that [patients] were fit for discharge. So tests were taken, but results weren’t necessarily available before the move was made,” she told the ABC.

She said staff felt “scared” and “anxious” that the hospital system was being prioritised over care homes.

“There was a feeling of being abandoned and thrown the wolves. They were expected to run mini-hospitals all of a sudden,” she said.

The UK Government denies there was any systematic discharge of infectious patients.

Earlier this month, Prime Minister Boris Johnson even appeared to blame care home staff, saying many “didn’t really follow the procedures”.

He later backtracked from those comments.https://www.youtube.com/embed/eqRUy-DNS2Q?feature=oembed&enablejsapi=1&origin=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.abc.net.auYOUTUBEBoris Johnson on care homes

“The one thing that nobody knew early on during this pandemic was that the virus was being passed asymptomatically from person to person in the way that it is,” he said.

Regardless of how the virus arrived in care homes, it wreaked havoc once inside.

Between early March and mid June, 66,112 people died in care home deaths in England and Wales. Nearly 30 per cent of those deaths “involved” COVID-19, according to the UK Office of National Statistics.

It accounted for one in three male deaths in care homes. For women, the figure was one in four.

Staff wore the ‘same mask for five shifts’

Australia has been building up its stocks of personal protective equipment (PPE) for several months, although some shortages have still been reported in Victoria, where aged care staff are now required to wear them.

An elderly woman talks to a care worker in full PPE
Some care homes say they had to compete with hospitals for personal protective equipment at the height of Britain’s outbreak.(Reuters: Eddie Keogh)

In the UK, care homes had to compete for supplies with better resourced hospitals, including several temporary ‘Nightingale’ clinics set up specifically to treat COVID-19 patients.

“Some consignments were coming into the UK docks and being diverted straight to the [new] Nightingale hospitals,” Ms Ahmed said.

Like many other care providers in the UK, Mr McGuire was not able to secure enough PPE, so staff had to reuse their masks for up to five shifts.

“It was better to reuse them than to not wear anything,” he said.

He said he hopes Australian aged care staff use everything at their disposal, even if it seems like overkill.

“Masks should be worn by everyone at all times,” he said.

While Australia’s rising infection numbers are still low compared to what occurred in the UK, Mr McGuire has warned that complacency can lead to catastrophe.

“You’re seeing what’s happening in other countries. You could face the same problem.”

Anatomy of a ‘mega-blaze’

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-07-27/gospers-mountain-mega-blaze-investigation/12472044?nw=0

As the first Black Summer inquiry prepares to report,  we reveal the inside story of Australia’s biggest bushfire.

By Kevin NguyenPhilippa McDonald and Maryanne TaoukUpdated 27 Jul 2020, 5:05amPublished 27 Jul 2020, 5:05am

It burned for 79 days and remains seared in the memory of all who feared and fought it.

The statistics are staggering. Over a million hectares burned; a hundred homes destroyed on Sydney’s doorstep.

Gospers Mountain became famous as Australia’s first “mega-blaze”.

But behind the smoke, flames and evacuations, there is still much to learn about the monster.

The ABC has pieced together data, imagery and interviews to form a new narrative of the fire.

The NSW Rural Fire Service (RFS) and National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS) contributed information and access to operational commanders, some speaking for the first time.

We can reveal the fire’s starting point, and how close Sydney’s suburbs came to disaster.

Firefighters tell of raised hopes as the flames faltered, and despair as backburns backfired.

This is how the mega-blaze unfolded.

Please go to:

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-07-27/gospers-mountain-mega-blaze-investigation/12472044?nw=0

Which mask works best? We filmed people coughing and sneezing to find out

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-07-27/which-face-mask-works-best-filmed-people-sneezing-coughing/12494174

By C Raina MacIntyre, Abrar Ahmad Chughtai, Charitha de Silva, Con Doolan, Prateek Bahl and Shovon Bhattacharjee

Posted 2 hours ago

How face coverings and masks minimise spreading coronavirus

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If you’re not sure whether wearing a face mask is worth it, or you need to wear a mask but are unsure which type, our new research should help you decide.

We took videos of what happens when you talk, cough and sneeze in different scenarios — while not wearing a mask, wearing two different types of cloth masks, or wearing a surgical mask.

The results, published in the journal Thorax, are clear.

A surgical mask was the most effective at blocking droplets and aerosols from talking, coughing and sneezing.

But if you can’t get hold of one, a cloth mask is the next best thing, and the more layers the better.For the latest news on the coronavirus pandemic follow our live coverage.

Here’s what we did and what we found

You can be infected with the coronavirus, but not show symptoms. So you cannot identify an infected person just by looking at them.

And you may be infected (and infectious) but not know it.

Facts about face masks

A man with a white mask stands in front of a red background with coronavirus graphics.

So we wanted to compare how effective different types of masks were at preventing outward transmission of droplets while talking, coughing and sneezing.

These are the types of masks the public might use to reduce community transmission.

We compared using no mask with two different types of cloth masks made from DIY templates provided online (one mask had a single layer of cloth; the other had two layers), and a three-layered surgical mask.

To visualise the droplets and aerosols you may not otherwise see, we used an LED lighting system with a high-speed camera.

We confirmed that even speaking generates substantial droplets. Coughing and sneezing (in that order) generate even more.

A three-ply surgical mask was significantly better than a one-layered cloth mask at reducing droplet emissions caused by speaking, coughing and sneezing, followed by a double-layer cloth face covering.

A single-layer cloth face covering also reduced the droplet spread caused by speaking, coughing and sneezing but was not as good as a two-layered cloth mask or surgical mask.

The difference between no masks and three different types of mask.
We compared using no mask with two different types of cloth masks made from DIY templates provided online and a three-layered surgical mask.(Supplied)

We do not know how this translates to infection risk, which will depend on how many asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic infected people are around.

However, it shows a single layer is not as good a barrier as a double layer.

What does this mean?

With mandated mask use in Greater Melbourne and the Mitchell Shire, we may face shortages of surgical masks.

So it is important to understand the design principles of cloth masks.How do I make a face mask?How do I make a face mask for coronavirus? Are they mandatory? Where can I get them? Your questions, answeredRead more

We did not test more than two layers, but generally, more layers are better.

For example, a 12-layered cloth mask is about as protective as a surgical mask, and reduces infection risk by 67 per cent.

We acknowledge it’s difficult to sew together 12 layers of fabric. But there are steps you can take to make cloth masks more effective. You can:

  • increase the number of layers (at least three layers)
  • use a water-resistant fabric for the outer layer
  • choose fabric with a high thread count (so a tighter weave, for instance from a good quality sheet is generally better than a fabric with a looser weave that you can clearly see light through)
  • hybrid fabrics such as cotton–silk, cotton–chiffon, or cotton–flannel may be good choices because they provide better filtration and are more comfortable to wear
  • make sure your mask fits and seals well around your face
  • wash your mask daily after using it.

To keep the COVID-19 outbreak under control we need to keep growth factor below 1.0

Australia’s current
growth factor is
1.04Jun 12Jul 26

Average 395 cases per day for the past 7 daysHIGHEST1.28 Mar 18thLOWEST0.87 Apr 14thFIND OUT MORE →

The evidence is mounting

In practice, we don’t yet know which has a greater effect — wearing masks to prevent infected people spreading to others or protecting well people from inhaling infected aerosols. Probably both are equally important.

In Missouri, two infected hairdressers kept working while infectious, but wore a mix of cloth and surgical masks, as did their 139 clients. No client was infected.https://www.youtube.com/embed/UNCNM7AZPFg?feature=oembed&enablejsapi=1&origin=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.abc.net.auYOUTUBEThe difference between face masks

However, one hairdresser infected her household family members, as she did not wear a mask at home, and neither did her family.

This is reassuring evidence that infection risk is reduced when everyone wears masks.

C Raina MacIntyre is professor of global biosecurity, NHMRC Principal Research Fellow, Head, Biosecurity Program, Kirby Institute, UNSW. Abrar Ahmad Chughtai is an epidemiologist at UNSW. Charitha de Silva is a lecturer at UNSW. Con Doolan is professor, School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, UNSW. Prateek Bahl is a PhD Candidate, School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, UNSW. Shovon Bhattacharjee is a PhD Candidate, The Kirby Institute, UNSW. This article originally appeared on The Conversation. Several authors of this article have received research grants from Paftec, Sanofi and Seqirus, Department of Defence and Australian Research Council.

What you need to know about coronavirus:

https://modules.wearehearken.com/abc-national/embed/5075/share?abcnewsembedheight=890&abcnewsembedheightmobile=1000Posted 2hhours agoShare

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The visit of the Queen of Sheba to King Solomon 1890

https://www.artgallery.nsw.gov.au/collection/works/898/

On the way to see the Queen of Sheba we also saw this picture:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/On_the_Wallaby_Track

On the wallaby track
Frederick McCubbin - On the wallaby track - Google Art Project.jpg
Artist Frederick McCubbin
Year 1896
Medium oil on canvas
Dimensions 122.0 cm × 223.5 cm (48.0 in × 88.0 in)
Location Art Gallery of New South WalesSydney

On the wallaby track is a 1896 painting by the Australian artist Frederick McCubbin. The painting depicts an itinerant family; a woman with her child on her lap and a man boiling a billy for tea. The painting’s name comes from the colloquial Australian term “On the wallaby track” used to describe itinerant rural workers or “swagmen” moving from place to place for work.[1] The work has been described as “among the best known and most popularly admired of Australian paintings”.[1]

A print of it hangs above our bed. Since we have prints of both of these paintings we are very familar with them and are always overjoyed when we are able to see them again at the Gallery.

This year it was a very brief visit of us to the Art Gallery. But it was worth it. It was very good that our daughter could take us there.

STAN GRANT’S SPEECH ON RACISM IN AUSTRALIA

https://mannerofspeaking.org/2016/01/26/stan-grants-speech-on-racism-in-australia/

Stan Grant, an indigenous Australian journalist, gave a speech in October 2015 at a debate on racism in Australia. The video of that speech has gone viral.

Stan Grant
Stan Grant

Several people are touting it as the Australian equivalent of Martin Luther King’s I Have a Dream speech. While I would not elevate this speech to that status—and Grant himself has said that, while he is flattered, he is “not in any way worthy of that sort of comparison”—it is an excellent speech. Forceful, hopeful, compelling, moving.

Interestingly, Grant apparently delivered the speech off-the-cuff.

I didn’t want to write anything, I didn’t want to be standing there looking down at notes. I just wanted to look people directly in the eye. I wanted to make a statement about how we live with the weight of history.

He succeeded.

What I liked

  • Grant was right to stand behind the lectern. Usually, a speaker should be out in front of the lectern so as to shrink the distance between himself and the audience. But certain occasions mandate the use of a lectern. A debate such as this is one of those times.
  • He has great eye contact throughout the speech.
  • Grant’s voice was powerful without being overbearing. He maintained a good pace and he excellent pauses.
  • He uses good hand gestures to emphasize his points. Even when he holds his hands together (starting at 1:05), it works well. Typically, speakers want to adopt and open posture and not hold their hands together; however, this is a good example of an exception to the rule.
  • He anchors his speech by returning to a phrase, “The Australian Dream”, 11 times. This certainly has echoes of Martin Luther’s King’s speech in front of the Lincoln Memorial. In that speech, King invoked the phrase “I have a dream” eight times.
  • He uses alliteration to frame his arguments: “We heard a howl. We heard a howl of humiliation that echoes across two centuries of dispossession, injustice, suffering and survival.” / “The Australian Dream is rooted in racism.”
  • Grant tells personal stories of his family members and the indignities that they suffered, whether they were indigenous or white. He thereby enhances his own credibility when it comes to the subject of racism in Australia.
  • Grant is humble in crediting his success to his family members who came before him.
  • He uses statistics to support his arguments. “My people die young in this country. We die ten years younger than average Australians and we are far from free. We are fewer than three percent of the Australian population and yet we are 25 percent, a quarter of those Australians locked up in our prisons and if you are a juvenile, it is worse, it is 50 percent. An Indigenous child is more likely to be locked up in prison than they are to finish high school.”
  • Grant invokes passages from important Australian songs and poems—the Australian National Anthem and Dorothea Mackellar’s My Countryand then uses antimetabole to show how the state of indigenous peoples in Australia has been the opposite of what is praised in song and verse.

We sing of it, and we recite it in verse. Australians all, let us rejoice for we are young and free. My people die young in this country. We die ten years younger than average Australians and we are far from free.

I love a sunburned country, a land of sweeping plains, of rugged mountain ranges. It reminds me that my people were killed on those plains. We were shot on those plainsdisease ravaged us on those plains.

  • He uses commoratio to emphasize the disdain and hatred with which the British regarded the indigenous peoples of Australia:

And when British people looked at us, they saw something sub-human, and if we were human at all, we occupied the lowest rung on civilisation’s ladder. We were fly-blown, stone age savages and that was the language that was used.

  • Notwithstanding the foregoing, Grant sounds a hopeful note by appealing to the higher instincts of Australians.

The Australian Dream. We’re better than this. I have seen the worst of the world as a reporter. I spent a decade in war zones from Iraq to Afghanistan, and Pakistan. We are an extraordinary country. We are in so many respects the envy of the world.

Of course racism is killing the Australian Dream. It is self evident that it’s killing the Australian dream. But we are better than that. The people who stood up and supported Adam Goodes and said, “No more,” they are better than that. The people who marched across the bridge for reconciliation, they are better than that. The people who supported Kevin Rudd when he said sorry to the Stolen Generations, they are better than that. My children and their non-Indigenous friends are better than that. My wife who is not Indigenous is better than that.

  • He concludes by returning to the line from the Australian that he referenced at the beginning. He thus has a circular ending. But more than that, he emphasizes the word “all” to show his hope for the future:

And one day, I want to stand here and be able to say as proudly and sing as loudly as anyone else in this room, Australians all, let us rejoice.

Congratulations, Stan Grant on your excellent speech. Here’s hoping that it leads to some positive, concrete steps in your country. And elsewhere.

Stan Grant’s challenge to Australia: How seriously are you going to take me?

https://www.smh.com.au/lifestyle/stan-grants-challenge-to-australia-how-seriously-are-you-going-to-take-me-20160406-gnzk7r.html

Stan Grant has faced up to prejudice, poverty, public judgment and private agony. Now, the Indigenous journalist says he knows more – and has worked harder – than any of our frontbench politicians. And he’s ready to take them on.

Karla’s wish is Granted

https://www.news.com.au/entertainment/celebrity-life/karlas-wish-is-granted/news-story/db04b5173ffc8889a7021834fc57e264

THREE years ago, Stan Grant whisked his two sons off to live with him and his partner Tracey Holmes in China _ leaving his ex-wife Karla nearly 9000km away from her kids.

Finally, Karla will get them back for good.

The SBS Living Black host, at the centre of a messy marriage breakdown with former Today Tonight host Grant after he was caught with sports reporter Holmes at the 2000 Athens Olympics, will have boys John, 12, and Dylan, 9, back under her roof later before the end of the year.

“They’ve been away for a couple of years now. It has been tough,” Karla said yesterday.

“It’s been a great experience for them in terms of going to school, learning a whole new different culture and meeting kids from all different countries so I think it will help them in the fture.”

Karla, who presented an award at last night’s Deadly Awards, said it had been a mutual agreement with her ex-husband for the boys to join him in Beijing, where he works as a presenter for CNN.

“I’ve got custody of the kids but he asked me if he could take them over there and I thought it would be a great experience for them,” she said.

Karla also added weight to rumours Grant himself may return to Sydney with now wife Holmes and their own son, Jesse, to be closer to his family.

“He’s looking at coming back. I’m not sure whether he’ll be back for good,” she said.

Karla was joined by 19-year-old daughter Lowanna at the Deadlys, where, ironically, Grant’s father Stan Grant Snr picked up the award for Outstanding Achievement in Education for his contribution to preserving the Wiradjuri language.

Other major winners of Indigenous Australia’s highest honour included Troy Cassar-Daley for artist of the year, Anthony Mundine (male sportsperson of the year) and Jamie Gulpilil (actor of the year)

Originally published asKarla’s wish is Granted