Report into COVID-19 response asserts ‘mistakes were made’

By Jessica Kidd

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2022-10-20/covid-review-finds-vulnerable-people-disadvantaged-by-response/101554960

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Disadvantaged and vulnerable people “bore the brunt” of Australia’s COVID-19 pandemic response, according to a report.

Key points:

  • The review has found that governments were making decisions in a “fog of uncertainty”
  • It received submissions from more than 350 people 
  • Many of Australia’s border closures and lockdowns were the result of policy failures in quarantine and contact tracing, the review also found

The privately funded review has condemned Australia’s handling of the COVID-19 pandemic, arguing that government health measures and policies lacked transparency and further entrenched existing inequalities.

“Governments and public servants were making decisions in a fog of uncertainty,” the review said.

“But, looking back, we are persuaded that significant mistakes were made.”

It found disadvantaged or vulnerable groups — such as low socio-economic families, people with disabilities, aged care residents, migrant communities, women and children — were disproportionately impacted by COVID-19 policies.

The review was funded by three philanthropic organisations: Andrew Forrest’s Minderoo Foundation, the Paul Ramsay Foundation and the John and Miriam Wylie Foundation.

It was led by Western Sydney University Chancellor Peter Shergold, along with businesswoman and former University of Wollongong Chancellor Jillian Broadbent, University of Queensland Chancellor Peter Varghese and 2021 Young Australian of the Year Isobel Marshall.

It received submissions from more than 350 people, including health experts, public servants, economists, business groups and community organisations.

The review was sharply critical of taxpayer-funded economic policies — such as JobKeeper — arguing big businesses were favoured while casual and temporary workers were left without financial support. 

“Failing to include a claw-back mechanism for businesses supported by JobKeeper was a design fault,” it said. “It was fiscally irresponsible and unfair when other groups in society were excluded from economic supports.”

It also argued that many of Australia’s border closures and lockdowns were the result of policy failures in quarantine and contact tracing, and could have been avoided.

“Rules were too often formulated and enforced in ways that lacked fairness and compassion,” it said.

“Businesspeople were often allowed to travel across borders whilst those wanting to visit dying loved ones or newborn family members were not afforded a similar opportunity.”

The review argued that schools should have stayed open, particularly once it became clear they were not high-transmission environments.

Dr Mark Veitch gives an update on man who tested positive for coronavirus
Disadvantaged and vulnerable people “bore the brunt” of Australia’s COVID-19 pandemic response, according to a report. (News Video)

“For children and parents — particularly women — we failed to get the balance right, between protecting health and imposing long-term costs on education, mental health, the economy and workforce outcomes,” it said.

“The social and economic costs were likely significant.”

It also warned of the “perils of overreach” when it came to implementing and enforcing COVID-19 public health measures. 

The review found many Australians — particularly those living under strict and extended lockdowns in Melbourne and Western Sydney — felt they were “being protected by being policed”.

“There were too many instances in which government regulations and their enforcement went beyond what was required to control the virus,” it argued.

“Such overreach undermined public trust and confidence in the institutions that are vital to effective crisis response.”

It claims to be apolitical and states that its terms of reference “were not dictated by a politician”.

The review states its submissions were received voluntarily and participants were given “complete confidentiality so they were able to speak freely”.

How dancing can help slow — and potentially reverse — the ageing process

https://www.abc.net.au/news/health/2022-10-06/dancing-can-slow-and-reverse-ageing-process/101324714

Watch part one of Catalyst’s Keep On Dancing on ABC iview. Part two airs on ABC TV and ABC iview next Tuesday, October 11.

ABC Health & Wellbeing

 / 

By science reporter Gemma Conroy for Catalyst

Posted 10h ago10 hours ago, updated 13m ago13 minutes ago

A group of nine older people wearing white in various dance poses
Dancing isn’t just a great workout — it can also slow down the ageing process.(ABC: Catalyst )

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For most of us, dancing is a fun way to unwind, or something we do after a few too many drinks on a Saturday night.

But what if dancing can actually help to slow — or in some cases even reverse — the ageing process? The ABC’s Catalyst program wanted to find out.

In his youth, Roderick spent his weekends dancing the night away at rave parties. 

“I thought I was a good dancer,” the 67-year-old says.

Older man wearing white with hands on his hand and eyes closed
Roderick had experienced numbness in his legs for years — until he started dancing. (ABC: Catalyst)

But Roderick’s life changed four decades ago when he was diagnosed with HIV.

Since taking antiretroviral medication for his illness, he developed peripheral neuropathy — a condition that causes numbness, weakness and pain in the hands and feet.

The drug that saved Roderick’s life has left him without any feeling in his legs, making it difficult for him to balance — let alone dance.

“It was like walking on rubber,” he says.

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Recently, Roderick joined eight other participants in a Catalyst experiment that explored how dance can help older people improve their physical and mental wellbeing. 

Over 12 weeks, the participants spent four hours each week learning a routine that combined dance and sign language.

Led by Australian choreographer Kelley Abbey, the program culminated in a live performance at the National Institute of Dramatic Art (NIDA) in Sydney.

The participants also took part in seven health-based assessments that measured their physical and cognitive abilities before and after the program.

But after just three rehearsals, Roderick had already made a breakthrough.

After 10 years of living without any feeling in his legs, he says he began to feel a twinge of pain in his calf muscle while doing some stretches.

“It’s pain, but it’s bloody good pain.”

And there was more good news to come.

The big slowdown

Love it or hate it, we are all getting older. When we look in the mirror, we might notice a few more wrinkles or strands of silver hair, but there are also a lot of changes happening on the inside.

For one, we slowly begin to lose muscle mass at around the age of 35, a process that speeds up after we turn 60. This can make us weaker and more susceptible to fatigue, making it tougher to get our bodies moving. 

The way we walk also changes. While we may have been able to dart across the street in our youth, we tend to take shorter, slower steps as we get older, leading to unsteadiness on our feet.

https://www.youtube.com/embed/VScrN610Rn8?feature=oembedYOUTUBEReducing trips and falls in older age

So, it’s no surprise that falls are the most common cause of injury-related deaths in people over the age of 75, according to data from NHS Digital in the UK.

“That can be one of the most problematic physical aspects of ageing,” says Rachel Ward, a biomechanical scientist at UNSW Sydney.

“Falls are a huge burden on the public health system.”

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Dealing with these physical challenges and the risks that come with them can impact daily life.

Over time, it can become more tempting to take it easy and skip exercise altogether. 

On top of that, our cognitive abilities — such as being able to recall names, numbers and do mental calculations on the spot — can take a hit.

But staying fit and mentally sharp go hand in hand — for better or worse, says Emily Cross, a cognitive neuroscientist at the MARCS Institute for Brain, Behaviour and Development at Western Sydney University. 

Black older woman in blue fur coat smiling with arms raised
The more you move, the longer you’ll keep your mind and body young.(Getty Images: Flashpop)

If you’re not moving as much, you’re also not giving your brain enough of a workout.

“We hear it again and again — the use it or lose it mantra,” Professor Cross says.

“That’s particularly the case for physical activity and the maintenance of physical circuits in the brain.”

Get your groove on

But it’s not all doom and gloom. While any form of exercise is good for the mind and body, dancing ticks every box in one go.

Almost half of Australians live with a long-term health issue. It’s why the ABC is hosting a national conversation till mid-November focusing on Australia’s health and wellbeing. It’s Your Move.

Unlike doing squats or lifting weights, dancing is like multitasking on steroids.

You’re moving your body through space, remembering sequences of steps, coordinating with other dancers around you — all while moving in time with music (or trying to!).

This gives your body a 360-degree workout, Dr Ward says.

“What’s unique about dance is that you’re not just doing the same movement over and over … you’re learning so much at the same time,” she says. 

“All of that provides a constant musculoskeletal and neurological challenge.”

Dancing is particularly good for your heart. One 2016 study on more than 48,000 participants over the age of 40 found that those who danced had a 46 per cent lower risk of dying from heart disease compared to non-dancers.

Several studies have also linked dancing with improved balance, flexibility, muscle strength and coordination. 

Older women standing at a bar learning ballet
Dance is a great way to improve your balance, flexibility and agility. (Supplied: Meg Letton/UNSW)

By the end of the Catalyst experiment, all the participants saw improvements in their fitness, balance and agility.

On the four-square step test — which measured how quickly participants could step between four squares — Roderick improved his time by over 30 per cent.

And while he struggled to balance on one leg at the beginning of the program, he was able to stand on his right leg for 30 seconds after 12 weeks of dancing.

Older woman in white smiling and standing in a dance pose
Dancing can be beneficial for people with Parkinson’s, like 72-year-old Anni.(ABC: Catalyst)

Dancing can also help people with conditions like Parkinson’s disease — which affects about one in 100 people over the age of 65.

People with Parkinson’s disease often find it difficult to control their movements.

But dancing to music can help them tap into parts of their brain that aren’t as affected by the disease, helping them to find more flow in their movements, says Natalie Allen, a neurological physiotherapist who specialises in Parkinson’s disease at The University of Sydney.

“The rhythm of the music helps people with Parkinson’s to move more freely and easily,” Dr Allen tells Catalyst.

Anni, 72, was diagnosed with early-stage Parkinson’s disease this year after noticing a tremble in her hands.

Balance can become an issue as Parkinson’s disease progresses, but after taking part in Catalyst’s dance experiment, Anni reduced the wobble in her stance by a whopping two-thirds.

https://www.youtube.com/embed/VM4DLYMpzgI?feature=oembedYOUTUBEMyf Warhurst takes Anni to a Dance For Parkinson’s session to see if it can help.

A disco for your brain

Whether you’re trying to master ballroom dancing or a perfect pirouette, dancing makes your brain light up.

All that learning can also reshape and forge new pathways in your brain.

A 2021 study on 60- to 79-year-olds found that doing a combination of brisk walking and social dancing increased the amount of white matter — neural tissue that enables brain cells to rapidly send and receive messages.

“With dance, we have the whole complement of cognitive and social tasks going on,” Professor Cross tells Catalyst.

“If you want to stave off neurological decline in general, dance is a great way to exercise your brain across multiple domains.”

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It’s tricky to study what’s happening in people’s brains while they’re spinning and swaying in a rehearsal room.

But Professor Cross has done the next best thing: taking a peek at what’s happening in people’s brains as they watch a video of their teacher performing a dance routine they’re learning.

“If you’re going to learn to dance, you’re going to learn by watching someone else do it,” she says.

“You have to translate what you’re seeing in other people’s bodies onto your own.”

Our brains contain special cells called mirror neurons, which allow us to learn through watching someone else.

These cells are located in areas of the brain involved in controlling body movements, spatial awareness and attention.

Professor Cross and her team have found that this network of mirror neurons kicks into gear while people are watching and learning — even if they’re just watching a video of someone else performing the routine they’ve learnt.

“These regions are sharpening their responses and are really kind of coming online in a way that helps you bridge that gap between what you see someone else do with their body, and what you do with your body,” Professor Cross says.

The good news is that these same regions switch on in people of all ages, indicating that the brain never loses its ability to learn new things.

“It’s really, really exciting that the learning is kind of shaping these brain circuits,” Professor Cross says.

“It means you can teach an old dog new tricks.”

This cognitive boost was also seen in Catalyst’s dancers.

Shirley, who five years ago was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease — the most common form of dementia — had the biggest improvement of all the participants.

An older man and woman wearing white and holding hands as they dance
Shirley (right) has Alzheimer’s disease, but she noticed her cognition improve after 12 weeks of dancing. (ABC: Catalyst)

In the beginning, Shirley’s performance on the cognitive tests was much poorer than the rest of the group.

But after three months of dancing, her test results were closer to the rest of the participants.

“It’s fantastic, I can’t believe it,” the 75-year-old tells Catalyst.

And while Shirley may not be able to dance away her condition entirely, her results show that the physical, creative and social aspects of dance can be beneficial.

“All these aspects of dance can potentially help slow the progress of dementia,” Professor Cross says.

The ultimate mood booster

One in eight Australians over the age of 65 are socially isolated or experience loneliness, which can lead to low mood and poor mental health.

While going for a walk with friends is one way to stay connected, dancing gets you out of your comfort zone in ways that other types of exercise don’t, Professor Cross says.

“If you’re learning new things and making mistakes, and laughing at yourself and with each other, there’s potential for building social bonds that you might not get if you’re just in a walking group,” she says.

“There’s expressing yourself through your bodily motions, and none of the other physical activities will have that.”

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Several studies have shown that dancing for at least 150 minutes a week can reduce depression in older people, while others have found that it can help alleviate anxiety and social isolation.

It’s also a great confidence boost, which Shirley experienced for herself in the Catalyst experiment as she started getting the hang of the dance routine after a few weeks of rehearsals.

“The fact that I can do it and I’m getting my head around it all … I really value that,” she says.

“I feel that I belong and I’m not a burden to others.”

A group of older people dancing in couples
Dancing is a great way to boost mood and connect with others.(Getty Images: Thomas Barwick)

With so many different styles of dance out there, it can be difficult to figure out how to pick just one. But you can’t really go wrong, Dr Ward says.

“I think any form of dance is going to provide a physical, mental and cognitive challenge.”

A good way to narrow down your options is to consider the type of music you’ve always enjoyed and how much you want to move, Dr Ward says.

But ultimately, the most beneficial form of dancing is the one that you enjoy the most.

“When we talk about the best intervention, it’s the one that people want to stick with,” Professor Cross says.

For Roderick the benefits are “life-changing”. By the end of the program, he experienced complete feeling in his legs after 10 years of numbness.

“The joy of actually feeling the sheets on your legs … I can actually differentiate between hot and cold now,” he says.

“I’ll be keeping on dancing, that’s for sure.” 

Tulip Time

Maybe in one of the following years I’ll be able to go again to the Tulip Festival with some dear people. It was so good, when we went to Bowral some 40 years ago!

Bowral Tulip Festival 1982 and 1983

 auntyuta  Life in AustraliaMemoriesOld Age  September 18, 2015 1 Minute

We have some pictures to prove that we were at Bowral in 1982 and also in 1983. In 1982 we were in Bowral with our friends and their daughter Ellen who was a good companion for our daughter Caroline who was four at the time. I remember that in 1982 we were not only at Corbett Gardens in Bowral, but we had also tickets to visit a number of private display garden. We enjoyed very much looking at all the gardens.

Caroline and Ellen with Dutch Girls at the Bowral Tulip Festival in 1982
Caroline and Ellen with Dutch Girls at the Bowral Tulip Festival in 1982
Bowral 1982: Ellen with her parents and Caroline with us, her parents.
Bowral 1982:
 Caroline with us, her parents, also Ellen with her parents
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For the following pictures it says in our album “Bowral Oct.83” During that visit Caroline was not quite five yet. The Tulip Festival was on again in the Corbett Gardens, the same as every year. Since Caroline is to be seen in the picture with some Dutch girls from the Festival, I think that the Tulip Festival must still have been on, even though it was already October.

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Edit”Bowral Tulip Festival 1982 and 1983″

Published by auntyuta

Auntie, Sister. Grandmother, Great-Grandmother, Mother and Wife of German Descent I’ve lived in Australia since 1959 together with my husband Peter. We have four children, eight grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. I started blogging because I wanted to publish some of my childhood memories. I am blogging now also some of my other memories. I like to publish some photos too as well as a little bit of a diary from the present time. Occasionally I publish a story with a bit of fiction in it. Peter, my husband, is publishing some of his stories under berlioz1935.wordpress.com View all posts by auntyuta

PublishedSeptember 18, 2015

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4 thoughts on “Bowral Tulip Festival 1982 and 1983”

  1. The EmuEditWhat an absolutely gorgeous display Uta, that must have been a very enjoyable outing.
    Best wishes for a beautiful weekend, and happy traveling.Reply
    1. auntyuta EditThese pictures help us to remember these two Tulip Festivals so many years ago. We have seen the Corbett Gardens at other times too,so not always for the tulip festival. These gardens do look beautiful at any time of the year with lots of trees and different plants and flowers.
      Thanks for commenting, dear Emu. Reply
  2. Sue DreamwalkerEditWonderful photo’s Uta, and I bet you brought home some wonderful memories xx Enjoy your weekend.. Hugs Sue xxReply
    1. auntyuta EditYes, Sue, the highlands, especially Bowral, Moss Vale and Robertson, always bring back lots of memories. We are glad, this year we went up there earlier in the week for it looks like we are in now for a very rainy weekend. Hugs back, dear Sue oxxo

John Olsen (Australian artist)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to navigationJump to search

John Olsen
AOOBE
BornJohn Henry Olsen
21 January 1928 (age 94)
Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia
NationalityAustralian
Awards2005 Archibald Prize

John Henry Olsen AO OBE (born 21 January 1928) is an Australian artist and winner of the 2005 Archibald Prize.[1] Olsen’s primary subject of work is landscape.

Family and personal life[edit]

John Olsen lives near BowralNew South Wales. In 1962, he married fellow artist Valerie Strong.[citation needed][29] Daughter Jane Olsen (with first wife Mary Flower), died in 2009.[30] John Olsen was married to his third wife, artist Noela Hjorth until 1986 and married his fourth wife, Katharine Howard, in 1989. Katharine Howard died in 2016.[31][citation needed] Son of the Brush is a 2020 memoir by Tim Olsen about his life as the son of artist John Olsen.

Daughter Louise Olsen is a co-founder of cult Australian fashion jewellery label Dinosaur Designs[3

I copied this Post about COVID Lockdowns

DR. EDDY BETTERMANN MD

 

Covid lockdowns killed 20X more people than they ever could have saved

Covid lockdowns killed 20X more people than they ever could have saved
The Kidney Cleanse Kit is a comprehensive way to cleanse your kidneys and rejuvenate your system. It includes Renaltrex®, Oxy-Powder®, and Latero-Flora™.

A new study published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health suggests that millions of people would still be alive were it not for the government’s Wuhan coronavirus (Covid-19) lockdowns.

Twenty times more people died rather than lived because of the lockdowns, the study reveals. Sedentary behavior, isolation and delayed medical treatments are among the many reasons why lockdowns caused far more harm than good.

“In this work, we performed a narrative review of the works studying the above effectiveness, as well as the historic experience of previous pandemics and risk-benefit analysis based on the connection of health and wealth,” said the authors of the work from the Jerusalem College of Technology.

“The comparative analysis of different countries showed that the assumption of lockdowns’ effectiveness cannot be supported by evidence – neither regarding the present COVID-19 pandemic, nor regarding the 1918 – 1920 Spanish Flu and other less-severe pandemics in the past.”

Entitled “Are Lockdowns Effective in Managing Pandemics?” the paper contains clear data estimating the number of lives lost due to lockdown restrictions, which were pushed by the likes of Tony Fauci, Deborah Birx and even Mike Pence. People would have been much better off just living their lives as normal, it turns out.

“It should be mentioned that the same conclusions – no clear benefit of lockdowns in case of pandemic – were made by national and international bodies before COVID-19 emerged,” the paper further explains.

“Namely, several governments prepared detailed plans of response to influenza-like pandemics years ago – see the programs of the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (2007) and the Israeli Ministry of Health (2007).”

In 2019, WHO warned against lockdowns for pandemics saying they’re “not recommended in any circumstances”

Even the World Health Organization (WHO) was against lockdowns before it was suddenly for them at the onset of the Fauci Flu plandemic. Here is what a comprehensive, 91-page preparedness plan released by WHO back in October 2019 says:

  • Social distancing measures ‘can be highly disruptive’ and should be carefully weighted;
  • Travel-related measures are ‘unlikely to be successful;’ ‘border closures may be considered only by small island nations in severe pandemics;’
  • Contact tracing and quarantine of exposed individuals are not recommended in any circumstances.

In other words, pretty much everything that ended up being imposed on the masses to fight covid was something that the WHO warned at least a year prior was not helpful in keeping people healthy and safe.

It is not just that lockdowns were ineffective: they were explicitly harmful, the paper found. They appear to have been used as a means of culling the population, not saving lives. (Related: Communist China is STILL doing lockdowns.)

“The lockdown policies had a direct side effect of increasing mortality,” the paper explains. “Hospitals in Europe and USA were prepared to manage pretty small groups of highly contagious patients, while unprepared for a much more probable challenge – large-scale contagion.”

“As a result, public health care facilities and nursing homes often became vehicles of contamination themselves – to a large extent because of the lockdown-based emergency policy implementation.”

Every other time that lockdown measures have been tried throughout history, the effects were negative. At no point in time have they ever resulted in fewer sicknesses and deaths, and yet lockdowns were the first thing government officials both here and abroad suggested as a way to stop Chinese Germs from spreading.

“While our understanding of viral transmission mechanisms lead to the assumption that lockdowns may be an effective pandemic management tool, this assumption cannot be supported by the evidence-based analysis of the present COVID-19 pandemic, as well as of the 1918 – 1920 H1N1 influenza type-A pandemic (the Spanish Flu) and numerous less-severe pandemics in the past,” the paper concludes.

The latest plandemic-related news can be found at Pandemic.news.

Ethan Huff

Sources for this article include:

TheNationalPulse.com

DrEddyMD.com

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What happens if Ukraine’s Zaporizhzhia nuclear plant explodes?

News|Russia-Ukraine war

While an explosion is not impossible, experts say the greatest concern is in the leak of radiation that could come as a result of the Russia-Ukraine war.

Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Plant near Enerhodar
A serviceman with a Russian flag on his uniform stands guard near the Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Plant [File:Reuters]

By Elizabeth Melimopoulos

Published On 11 Aug 202211 Aug 2022

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has raised alarms about the shelling that is taking place at the Russian-controlled Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant in Ukraine, saying the current situation poses a great risk and could lead to a “nuclear disaster”.

Both Russia and Ukraine have accused each other of attacking the plant and of “nuclear terrorism”, with the IAEA urging “utmost restraint” around the site.

KEEP READING

list of 3 itemslist 1 of 3

Civilians killed as Russia intensifies attacks across Ukraine

list 2 of 3

World one misstep from ‘nuclear annihilation’: UN chief

list 3 of 3

Russia forces seize Ukraine nuclear plant after fire is put out

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Here is what we know so far about the situation.

Where is Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant and why is it important?

  • Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant is the largest plant in Europe and among the 10 largest in the world; it generates half of Ukraine’s nuclear-derived power.
  • The plant has a total capacity of about 6,000 megawatts, enough for about four million homes.
  • It is located in the southern Ukrainian steppe on the Dnieper River, some 550km (342 miles) southeast of Ukraine’s capital, Kyiv, and about 525km (325 miles) south of Chernobyl, the site of the world’s worst nuclear power plant accident in 1986.
  • Currently, the plant is operated by Ukrainian staff but Russian military units guard the facility.
  • According to the IAEA, the plant has six Soviet-designed water-cooled reactors containing uranium 235, each of which has a net capacity of 950 megawatts. A megawatt of capacity will provide energy for 400 to 900 homes in a year.
  • Zaporizhzhia plant is also located about 200km (125 miles) from Crimea, which Russia annexed in 2014.
  • On Tuesday, Ukrainian operator Energoatom said the Russian forces occupying the area were preparing to “connect the plant to the Crimean electricity grid”.
  • Michael Black, the director of the Centre of Nuclear Engineering at Imperial College London, told Al Jazeera that the main concern is that connecting the plant to the Crimean electricity grid could interrupt the offsite power to the reactors. “You need that power to provide cooling to the reactors … As long as [those generators] function, then everything is fine,” he said.
  • “It’s encouraging to see that the Russians want to use the electricity; that does imply that they don’t want to damage [the power plant],” he added.
INTERACTIVE - Nuclear power in Ukraine August 2022

What has the IAEA said?

  • Rafael Mariano Grossi, director-general of the IAEA, described the situation as “completely out of control” in an interview with The Associated Press last week.
  • “Every principle of nuclear safety has been violated” at the plant, Grossi said. “What is at stake is extremely serious and extremely grave and dangerous.”
  • During the interview, he said the physical integrity of the plant was not respected and the supply chain was interrupted, so it was not certain the plant was getting all it needs, “and there is a lot of nuclear material there to be inspected”.
  • In a statement released on Tuesday, Grossi said he was preparing to brief the UN Security Council about the nuclear safety in the plant on Thursday and his efforts to agree and lead an expert mission to the site as soon as possible.
  • The IAEA has been trying for months to send an inspection team to the nuclear plant but it has not been successful.
  • The watchdog also said on Tuesday that Ukraine had informed the IAEA about the restoration of a power line that can be used to supply the plant with electricity from a nearby thermal power plant if needed.
  • “This external power line is necessary to safeguard the proper cooling of the facility.
  • Grossi outlined the need for a secure offsite power supply as one of the seven nuclear safety pillars at the beginning of the conflict.

Given the IAEA’s warnings, could the plant explode – and if so – what would happen?

  • According to experts, this is possible but the likelihood of that taking place is not certain.
  • “What we have here with the military involvement is very difficult … If multiple catastrophic factors come together, an explosion might be possible,” Ross Peel, the Research and Knowledge Transfer Manager for the Centre for Science and Security Studies at King’s College London, told Al Jazeera.
  • “It’s difficult to say whether this will [happen] and the possible consequences of that, what they might be. It depends how the explosion comes about,” he added.
  • There are concerns about the shelling occurring around the facility, with the potential to damage critical infrastructure, including the reactors.
  • “Reactors [need] to be constantly cooled by water passing through [them,]” MV Ramana, a professor at the University of British Columbia’s School of Public Policy and Global Affairs, told Al Jazeera.
  • “If that water stream is cut out, cut down, cut off in some fashion, then the reactor could lose cooling, the fuel will start melting. It will sort of create high pressure, and the thing can explode,” he added.
  • In the immediate aftermath of an explosion, experts say that we could likely see widespread evacuations caused by an invisible radioactive cloud. However, the impact of a leak in radiation would probably be felt for years to come
  • “You’re probably going to see hundreds of thousands of people trying to flee from that area,” Ramana told Al Jazeera.
  • “There will be a cloud, but you’re not going to be able to see it … We’re able to track the cloud because [we] have sensitive instruments that are measuring radiation levels,” he added.
  • Some of the illnesses we could see from an explosion similar to this could be acute radiation poisoning or cancers that could be seen later.
  • “So, for instance, at Chernobyl, the people who were going into the reactor to actually stand on top of the burning building and put the fire out were exposed to huge amounts of radiation and suffered the impacts of that within hours,” Ross said.
  • “People who are exposed to not quite so great amounts may still suffer from acute radiation poisoning and recover. This happens over days to weeks, maybe months. For people exposed to lower levels of radiation, there may be greater numbers of cancer cases coming later over the following years to decades,” he added.
A view shows the Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Plant in the course of Ukraine-Russia conflict outside the Russian-controlled city of Enerhodar in the Zaporizhzhia region, Ukraine August 4, 2022. REUTERS/Alexander Ermochenko
The Zaporizhzhia plant is operated by Ukrainian staff, but Russian military units guard the facility [File: Reuters]

What other scenarios could take place?

  • Rather than a reactor core explosion, experts are more concerned about damage to systems that cool the spent fuel pool and the reactors. If the cooling fails, this could lead to an uncontrolled heat buildup, a meltdown and a fire that could release and spread radiation from the containment structures.
  • “We’re mostly scared of radiation release, not necessarily of an explosion,” Amelie Stoetzel, a PhD Student in the Department of War Studies at King’s College London, told Al Jazeera.
  •  “Even though that looks scary, [a] radiation release, in any case, would be catastrophic,” she added.
  •  “It’s unpredictable; we don’t really know where the plume [containing radioactive material] would go; it can go anywhere really, depending on the weather conditions.”
  • Due to the plant’s geographical location, a radiation release could hit any part of the European continent.
  • “Zaporizhzhia is in the middle of the continent. So no matter which way the wind is blowing, somebody’s going to get contaminated,” Ramana said.
  • Overall, experts emphasise that any kind of prediction is hard to make at this stage.
  • “The only certainty we have really is that the military activity around the nuclear power plant poses a risk to it. And how exactly that will play out is, is very difficult to predict,” Ross said.

If there is a radiation leak, what happens next?

  • Experts expect immediate evacuations but also difficulties in accessing medical facilities since they will probably see a surge in patients.
  • “When there were incidents of radiation accidents, there were a lot of people that showed up with symptoms of radiation poisoning, even though they had not been exposed, due to fear and panic,” Stoetzel said.
  • Experts also said that evacuations in a war zone will come with their own set of complications.
  • “A lot of people have already left the area, but there are still a lot of people left behind,” Stoetzel said.
  • “So yes, there would be a lot of people rushing to hospitals and rushing to get out of the area, which would be a problem … there would be confusion; in an ongoing war, evacuating people is extremely difficult,” she added.
  • According to experts, for many people, the fear of radiation could be more dangerous than the radiation itself.
  • “We could see an uptick in patients because of the psychological symptoms that are connected to the knowledge that radiation might have leaked from a nuclear power plant nearby,”
  • “So actually the most problematic issue for the government at least would be how to deal with a large number of patients,” she added.
  • In case of an explosion, or a fire, a leak of radiation could lead to a “long-term disaster”.
  • “It’s not something where people are going to be exposed to it and immediately fall down and die … there’s going to be a huge, psychological toll, right on top of the psychological toll of the war itself,”  Ramana said.


Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Plant near Enerhodar
A serviceman with a Russian flag on his uniform stands guard near the Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Plant [File:Reuters]

By Elizabeth Melimopoulos

Published On 11 Aug 202211 Aug 2022

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has raised alarms about the shelling that is taking place at the Russian-controlled Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant in Ukraine, saying the current situation poses a great risk and could lead to a “nuclear disaster”.

Both Russia and Ukraine have accused each other of attacking the plant and of “nuclear terrorism”, with the IAEA urging “utmost restraint” around the site.

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World one misstep from ‘nuclear annihilation’: UN chief

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Russia forces seize Ukraine nuclear plant after fire is put out

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Here is what we know so far about the situation.

Where is Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant and why is it important?

  • Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant is the largest plant in Europe and among the 10 largest in the world; it generates half of Ukraine’s nuclear-derived power.
  • The plant has a total capacity of about 6,000 megawatts, enough for about four million homes.
  • It is located in the southern Ukrainian steppe on the Dnieper River, some 550km (342 miles) southeast of Ukraine’s capital, Kyiv, and about 525km (325 miles) south of Chernobyl, the site of the world’s worst nuclear power plant accident in 1986.
  • Currently, the plant is operated by Ukrainian staff but Russian military units guard the facility.
  • According to the IAEA, the plant has six Soviet-designed water-cooled reactors containing uranium 235, each of which has a net capacity of 950 megawatts. A megawatt of capacity will provide energy for 400 to 900 homes in a year.
  • Zaporizhzhia plant is also located about 200km (125 miles) from Crimea, which Russia annexed in 2014.
  • On Tuesday, Ukrainian operator Energoatom said the Russian forces occupying the area were preparing to “connect the plant to the Crimean electricity grid”.
  • Michael Black, the director of the Centre of Nuclear Engineering at Imperial College London, told Al Jazeera that the main concern is that connecting the plant to the Crimean electricity grid could interrupt the offsite power to the reactors. “You need that power to provide cooling to the reactors … As long as [those generators] function, then everything is fine,” he said.
  • “It’s encouraging to see that the Russians want to use the electricity; that does imply that they don’t want to damage [the power plant],” he added.
INTERACTIVE - Nuclear power in Ukraine August 2022

What has the IAEA said?

  • Rafael Mariano Grossi, director-general of the IAEA, described the situation as “completely out of control” in an interview with The Associated Press last week.
  • “Every principle of nuclear safety has been violated” at the plant, Grossi said. “What is at stake is extremely serious and extremely grave and dangerous.”
  • During the interview, he said the physical integrity of the plant was not respected and the supply chain was interrupted, so it was not certain the plant was getting all it needs, “and there is a lot of nuclear material there to be inspected”.
  • In a statement released on Tuesday, Grossi said he was preparing to brief the UN Security Council about the nuclear safety in the plant on Thursday and his efforts to agree and lead an expert mission to the site as soon as possible.
  • The IAEA has been trying for months to send an inspection team to the nuclear plant but it has not been successful.
  • The watchdog also said on Tuesday that Ukraine had informed the IAEA about the restoration of a power line that can be used to supply the plant with electricity from a nearby thermal power plant if needed.
  • “This external power line is necessary to safeguard the proper cooling of the facility.
  • Grossi outlined the need for a secure offsite power supply as one of the seven nuclear safety pillars at the beginning of the conflict.

Given the IAEA’s warnings, could the plant explode – and if so – what would happen?

  • According to experts, this is possible but the likelihood of that taking place is not certain.
  • “What we have here with the military involvement is very difficult … If multiple catastrophic factors come together, an explosion might be possible,” Ross Peel, the Research and Knowledge Transfer Manager for the Centre for Science and Security Studies at King’s College London, told Al Jazeera.
  • “It’s difficult to say whether this will [happen] and the possible consequences of that, what they might be. It depends how the explosion comes about,” he added.
  • There are concerns about the shelling occurring around the facility, with the potential to damage critical infrastructure, including the reactors.
  • “Reactors [need] to be constantly cooled by water passing through [them,]” MV Ramana, a professor at the University of British Columbia’s School of Public Policy and Global Affairs, told Al Jazeera.
  • “If that water stream is cut out, cut down, cut off in some fashion, then the reactor could lose cooling, the fuel will start melting. It will sort of create high pressure, and the thing can explode,” he added.
  • In the immediate aftermath of an explosion, experts say that we could likely see widespread evacuations caused by an invisible radioactive cloud. However, the impact of a leak in radiation would probably be felt for years to come
  • “You’re probably going to see hundreds of thousands of people trying to flee from that area,” Ramana told Al Jazeera.
  • “There will be a cloud, but you’re not going to be able to see it … We’re able to track the cloud because [we] have sensitive instruments that are measuring radiation levels,” he added.
  • Some of the illnesses we could see from an explosion similar to this could be acute radiation poisoning or cancers that could be seen later.
  • “So, for instance, at Chernobyl, the people who were going into the reactor to actually stand on top of the burning building and put the fire out were exposed to huge amounts of radiation and suffered the impacts of that within hours,” Ross said.
  • “People who are exposed to not quite so great amounts may still suffer from acute radiation poisoning and recover. This happens over days to weeks, maybe months. For people exposed to lower levels of radiation, there may be greater numbers of cancer cases coming later over the following years to decades,” he added.
A view shows the Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Plant in the course of Ukraine-Russia conflict outside the Russian-controlled city of Enerhodar in the Zaporizhzhia region, Ukraine August 4, 2022. REUTERS/Alexander Ermochenko
The Zaporizhzhia plant is operated by Ukrainian staff, but Russian military units guard the facility [File: Reuters]

What other scenarios could take place?

  • Rather than a reactor core explosion, experts are more concerned about damage to systems that cool the spent fuel pool and the reactors. If the cooling fails, this could lead to an uncontrolled heat buildup, a meltdown and a fire that could release and spread radiation from the containment structures.
  • “We’re mostly scared of radiation release, not necessarily of an explosion,” Amelie Stoetzel, a PhD Student in the Department of War Studies at King’s College London, told Al Jazeera.
  •  “Even though that looks scary, [a] radiation release, in any case, would be catastrophic,” she added.
  •  “It’s unpredictable; we don’t really know where the plume [containing radioactive material] would go; it can go anywhere really, depending on the weather conditions.”
  • Due to the plant’s geographical location, a radiation release could hit any part of the European continent.
  • “Zaporizhzhia is in the middle of the continent. So no matter which way the wind is blowing, somebody’s going to get contaminated,” Ramana said.
  • Overall, experts emphasise that any kind of prediction is hard to make at this stage.
  • “The only certainty we have really is that the military activity around the nuclear power plant poses a risk to it. And how exactly that will play out is, is very difficult to predict,” Ross said.

If there is a radiation leak, what happens next?

  • Experts expect immediate evacuations but also difficulties in accessing medical facilities since they will probably see a surge in patients.
  • “When there were incidents of radiation accidents, there were a lot of people that showed up with symptoms of radiation poisoning, even though they had not been exposed, due to fear and panic,” Stoetzel said.
  • Experts also said that evacuations in a war zone will come with their own set of complications.
  • “A lot of people have already left the area, but there are still a lot of people left behind,” Stoetzel said.
  • “So yes, there would be a lot of people rushing to hospitals and rushing to get out of the area, which would be a problem … there would be confusion; in an ongoing war, evacuating people is extremely difficult,” she added.
  • According to experts, for many people, the fear of radiation could be more dangerous than the radiation itself.
  • “We could see an uptick in patients because of the psychological symptoms that are connected to the knowledge that radiation might have leaked from a nuclear power plant nearby,”
  • “So actually the most problematic issue for the government at least would be how to deal with a large number of patients,” she added.
  • In case of an explosion, or a fire, a leak of radiation could lead to a “long-term disaster”.
  • “It’s not something where people are going to be exposed to it and immediately fall down and die … there’s going to be a huge, psychological toll, right on top of the psychological toll of the war itself,”  Ramana said.


A view shows the Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Plant in the course of Ukraine-Russia conflict outside the Russian-controlled city of Enerhodar in the Zaporizhzhia region, Ukraine August 4, 2022. REUTERS/Alexander Ermochenko
The Zaporizhzhia plant is operated by Ukrainian staff, but Russian military units guard the facility [File: Reuters]

What other scenarios could take place?

  • Rather than a reactor core explosion, experts are more concerned about damage to systems that cool the spent fuel pool and the reactors. If the cooling fails, this could lead to an uncontrolled heat buildup, a meltdown and a fire that could release and spread radiation from the containment structures.
  • “We’re mostly scared of radiation release, not necessarily of an explosion,” Amelie Stoetzel, a PhD Student in the Department of War Studies at King’s College London, told Al Jazeera.
  •  “Even though that looks scary, [a] radiation release, in any case, would be catastrophic,” she added.
  •  “It’s unpredictable; we don’t really know where the plume [containing radioactive material] would go; it can go anywhere really, depending on the weather conditions.”
  • Due to the plant’s geographical location, a radiation release could hit any part of the European continent.
  • “Zaporizhzhia is in the middle of the continent. So no matter which way the wind is blowing, somebody’s going to get contaminated,” Ramana said.
  • Overall, experts emphasise that any kind of prediction is hard to make at this stage.
  • “The only certainty we have really is that the military activity around the nuclear power plant poses a risk to it. And how exactly that will play out is, is very difficult to predict,” Ross said.

If there is a radiation leak, what happens next?

  • Experts expect immediate evacuations but also difficulties in accessing medical facilities since they will probably see a surge in patients.
  • “When there were incidents of radiation accidents, there were a lot of people that showed up with symptoms of radiation poisoning, even though they had not been exposed, due to fear and panic,” Stoetzel said.
  • Experts also said that evacuations in a war zone will come with their own set of complications.
  • “A lot of people have already left the area, but there are still a lot of people left behind,” Stoetzel said.
  • “So yes, there would be a lot of people rushing to hospitals and rushing to get out of the area, which would be a problem … there would be confusion; in an ongoing war, evacuating people is extremely difficult,” she added.
  • According to experts, for many people, the fear of radiation could be more dangerous than the radiation itself.
  • “We could see an uptick in patients because of the psychological symptoms that are connected to the knowledge that radiation might have leaked from a nuclear power plant nearby,”
  • “So actually the most problematic issue for the government at least would be how to deal with a large number of patients,” she added.
  • In case of an explosion, or a fire, a leak of radiation could lead to a “long-term disaster”.
  • “It’s not something where people are going to be exposed to it and immediately fall down and die … there’s going to be a huge, psychological toll, right on top of the psychological toll of the war itself,”  Ramana said.




P

Learning to Think Like Mencius in a Time of Crisis

CULTURAL WARFAREPHILOSOPHY

Posted by MATTHEW EHRETon

Full Reading Now Available.

Since ancient times, philosophers have sought the remedy to humanity’s recurrent plunges into war, division, chaos, ignorance and all the moral, temporal and spiritual ills that accompany those disharmonies.

In ancient Greece, this effort was spearheaded by Plato (427-347 BCE) and his school of disciples that applied the methods of their master Socrates (470-399 BCE) to unlocking not only scientific mysteries in astronomy, mechanics, geometry and medicine, but also natural law in the form of the Plato’s ongoing effort to organize philosopher kings capable of raising society to a standard of excellence whereby all citizens and rulers alike could finally access the pathway towards awakening self-understanding, agapic love of truth, beauty and the good and ultimately true happiness.

Paralleling this development many thousands of miles across the world island, the followers of Confucius (551-479 BCE) were engaged in an identical combat but with Chinese characteristics. By the 4th century BCE, this fight was spearheaded by Mencius (372-289 BCE) who worked tirelessly to organize a philosopher king during the dark days of the warring states period who would be capable of uniting the people under a unified state governed by Li (principle), Ren (agape/benevolence) and the Mandate of Heaven (Tian Ming).

Like Plato, whose efforts to educate Dionysius I and II to the status of Philosopher Kings of Syracuse were thwarted in his lifetime, so too did Mencius watch his efforts come undone by lesser souls incapable of seeing a higher reality beyond the limits of their senses. Yet despite these set-backs both philosophers established powerful schools of thought that endured far beyond the bookends of their lives which transmitted their teachings over many generations and which resulted in the greatest leaps of progress, peace, and creativity ever recorded among both eastern and western civilizations.

It is in this spirit that The Rising Tide Foundation is proud to present a new study group led by Dr. Quan Le which plunges into the geopolitical history of ancient China while also exploring the diverse philosophical currents, personalities and more in the form of a series of dialogues composed by the students of Mencius and translated by Professor Robert Eno.

To access the original text of Robert Eno’s translation of the Mencius, click here.

To access Dr. Quan Le’s class: “Plato and Confucius: Spiritual Brothers at Two Ends of the World Island”, click here.

Write to info@risingtidefoundation.net to participate in future lectures and readings

Make a one-time donation

Tulsi Gabbard Shreds Biden Admin: ‘They Weaponize Government Against the People’

Watch Tulsi Gabbard’s keynote speech on God, Freedom, and Democracy – Live from the Western Conservative Summit, Denver.

Gabbard’s remarks come amid a 75-day “pause” on the DHS rollout of its “Disinformation Governance Board”, where the department will review how to make the public more receptive to its Orwellian “Ministry of Truth.”

[…]

Via https://nworeport.me/2022/06/07/tulsi-gabbard-shreds-biden-admin-they-weaponize-government-against-the-people/

T

Recommend The Most Revolutionary Act to the readers of Uta’s WordPress Blogs

Uncensored updates on world events, economics, the environment and medicineRecommend

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auntyuta on  said:

“. . . parents attending school board hearings to condemn critical race theory and gender ideology indoctrination programs. . .”

Do these critics go as far as voicing the opinion that they d o want race-discrimination and no homosexuality?

This is a totally different issue, isn’t it?

I think, the government should not be allowed to suppress true information.

However, nobody should think they have a right to discriminate against
another person.

Liked by 1 person

Reply ↓

  • stuartbramhallon  said:Aunty, I think the nub of the issue is that mainstream media (and the Democrats) are trying to portray parents as bigoted when they express concern about public schools introducing children as young as 5 to extremely abstract concepts about race and sexual identity before they are old enough to fully grasp abstract concepts – and without parental consent.In my mind, the gender ideology and racial sensitivity training are two separate issues that parents are complaining about.As for the gender ideology, when I was in school, sex education was only offered at age 10-up and only with parental consent. At present, children as young as 5 are being taught that physical sex doesn’t equate with sexual identity and that people can hold as many as 24 different sexual identities. I’ve watched unhappy young people exposed to this ideology coming to the conclusion prior to adolescence that changing their gender is the automatic solution. With the result that they (and their teachers) put pressure on the parents to allow them to start puberty blockers at 11 and the hormones of the opposite sex two years later. The physical suffering they undergo from these treatments (which have never been tested for long term safety) is immense. Likewise there has never been any long term evaluation of the effect of exposing young children to gender ideology training, especially when the teachers are given little or no training on the appropriate way to teach it/Here in New Zealand, I fully support parents who decide to home school their kids to protect them from being exposed to what in my mind is basically propaganda with little or no scientific basis. While there are a number (around 1%) of children who are born as intersex individuals (with unclear external genitalia), I don’t believe that encouraging all preteen children to opt out of normal puberty will in anyway reduce or discourage discrimination against adult homosexuals and transsexuals.Critical Race Theory is a separate issue because Critical Race Theory is actually a university level area of study addressing the issue of what’s known as “intersectionality.” “Intersectionality” is the process of looking at a person’s social disadvantage on the basic of “intersecting” minority identities (usually class, ethnicity, sexual identity, sexual orientation, religion and level of disability). There is no way they are teaching Critical Race Theory in elementary school because there is no way young children can absorb such complex ideas.In my mind, CRT is another wedge issue, like gun control, to get people on the right and left to fight each other rather than the ruling elite.Liked by youReply ↓
    • auntyutaon  said:Stuart, thank you very, very much for this reply to clarify the situation. Even though I have children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren, it did not occur to me that this sort of thing was going on in elementary school. One grandson and his wife preferred to home school there two daughters when they were little! I always thought it was their right to do this. But I think I understand a bit better now what their motives may have been.
      When I went to school, sex education was not a school subject, not at all. As far as I know, all my children experienced very limited sex education, and this only past the age of 12 in high-school.