18 Coronavirus Autopsies (This is what they found in the Brain) | COVID-19

If you’ve seen my previous videos on autopsies that were done on COVID-19 patients, it’s pretty clear by now that when patients do die of this coronavirus, it’s because of the lungs. Either because of all the inflammation in the lungs, with pneumonia and cytokine storm and ARDS, sometimes with multiorgan failure….or because of the major blood clot that develops in the lungs. Sometimes though, blood clots show up in other parts of the body as well. For example, in some cases, clots can travel to the brain, and lodge in the blood vessels there, causing decreased blood flow to certain regions of the brain, and this is known as a stroke. But this virus, in a different manner, can cause neurologic symptoms in some people, such as headache, confusion, and anosmia, meaning loss of taste and smell. But we don’t really know why this coronavirus sometimes causes these symptoms. Is it because the coronavirus travels in the bloodstream to the brain? Maybe. After all, there are ACE2 receptors that are located in the brain. Is it because the virus gets in our nose, and used the olfactory nerves that are there to gain entry into our brain? Or are these symptoms more related to the effects of the cytokine storm, which is actually pretty common with infections in general, whether that be from pneumonia or something else? In a recent study in NEJM, they looked at brain findings from autopsies done on 18 patients who died from COVID-19, in a single teaching hospital. All 18 of these patients had nasopharyngeal swab samples that were positive for SARS-CoV-2 on RT-PCR. Eleven COVID 19 patients required mechanical ventilation, meaning a breathing tube. Interestingly, it was noted that all of the ventilated patients had a confusional state or decreased arousal from sedation for ventilation. The way that I interpret this is that when they paused the sedation, meaning they temporarily stopped the sedation to assess their mental status, the patient was able to follow commands during that time. This, in general, is not uncommon, but this does seem to occur more often with COVID 19 patients, and this is something that I’ve been finding with my COVID 19 patients in the ICU. On average, these COVID-19 patients died about 10 days after being admitted to the hospital. When they did the autopsies, they looked at the brain as a whole, and they also sampled 10 different areas of the brain, and then looked at those samples underneath the microscope. Microscopic examination showed acute hypoxic injury in some regions of the brain. Acute hypoxic injury means tissue was damaged as a result of not getting enough oxygen. There was an acute hypoxic injury in the cerebrum, which is the part of the brain that allows us to think, and be conscious. There was also an acute hypoxic injury in the cerebellum in all the patients. There were no blood clots in the brain, or vasculitis, meaning inflammation of blood vessels. So another thing we want to know, is, is the virus actually invading the cells of the brain? In this study, they actually tested the brain tissue for the virus with RT-PCR. Dr. Mike Hansen, MD Internal Medicine | Pulmonary Disease | Critical Care Medicine Website: https://doctormikehansen.com/ Instagram Account: http://instagram.com/doctor.hansen/

Outbreak Onboard: How fear and disease spread on the Ruby Princess | Four Corners

The Ruby Princess cruise ship is the single largest source of COVID-19 infections in Australia. Owned by the world’s largest cruise company, Carnival Corporation, the Ruby Princess was one of a fleet of cruise ships operating as the pandemic gathered speed. The company was well aware of the risks. Only five weeks earlier its sister ship, the Diamond Princess, created world headlines when its passengers were trapped on board as the virus spread. On March 19, thousands of its passengers disembarked from the Ruby Princess in Sydney before dispersing around the country and overseas. Far from protecting people, the release of its passengers triggered a public health emergency. Four Corners investigates how the Ruby Princess became an incubator for infection, leaving its passengers and staff dangerously exposed. We also examine the actions of Australian authorities who allowed the ship to dock and the passengers to disembark, taking the virus with them. Read more: https://ab.co/2Xql3Q6 _________ 

Senior Australian of the Year 2012 Laurie Baymarrwangga

In the nine decades since her birth on the island of Murrungga, Laurie Baymarrwangga has seen the arrival of missionaries, exploitation by Japanese and European fishermen, war and tumultuous change. Undaunted, she has almost single-handedly nurtured the inter-generational transmission of local ecological knowledge through a lifelong commitment to caring for kin, culture and country. Recently, Dr Bentley James travelled to the Crocodile Islands and asked some timely questions of our Senior Australian of the Year 2012.

Laurie Baymarrwangga – Senior Australian of the Year 2012

In the nine decades since her birth on the island of Murrungga, Laurie Baymarrwangga has seen the arrival of missionaries, exploitation by Japanese and European fishermen, war and tumultuous change. Undaunted, she has almost single-handedly nurtured the inter-generational transmission of local ecological knowledge through a lifelong commitment to caring for kin, culture and country. In the 1960s Laurie established a housing project on her homelands that has benefitted generations of kin. Speaking no English, with no access to funding, resources or expertise she initiated the Yan-nhangu dictionary project. Her cultural maintenance projects include the Crocodile Islands Rangers, a junior rangers group and an online Yan-nhangu dictionary for school children. In 2010, after a struggle stretching back to 1945, Laurie finally received back payments for rents owed to her as the land and sea owner of her father’s estate. She donated it all, around $400,000, to improve education and employment opportunities on the island and to establish a 1,000 square kilometre turtle sanctuary on her marine estate. In the face of many obstacles, this great, great grandmother has shown extraordinary leadership and courage in caring for the cultural and biological integrity of her beloved Crocodile Islands.

Noam Chomsky: Coronavirus – What is at stake? COVID & ECONOMY

The coronavirus is serious enough but it’s worth recalling that there is a much greater horror approaching, we are racing to the edge of disaster, far worse then anything that’s happened in human history. And Donald Trump and his minions are in the lead, in racing to the abyss. In fact there are two immense threats that we are facing. One is the growing threat of nuclear war, which has exacerbated it by the tearing what’s left of the arms control regime and the other of course is the growing threat of global warming. Both threats can be dealt, but there isn’t a lot of time and the corona virus is a horrible [inaudible] can have terrifying consequences But there will be recovery, while the others won’t be recovered, it’s finished. If we don’t deal with them, we’re done. And so the childhood memories are coming back to haunt me, but [in?] a different dimension. The threat of nuclear war didn’t get a sense of where the world really is, by looking to early, to this January, as may you know every year the doomsday clock is set, set with the minute-hand at certain distance from midnight, which means termination. But, ever since Trump was elected, the minute hand has been moving closer and closer to midnight. Last year it was two minutes to midnight. The highest, matching the highest it ever reached. This year the analysts dispensed with minutes, started moving to seconds, 100 seconds to midnight That’s the closest it’s ever been. Sighting three things: The threat of nuclear war, threat of global warming and the deterioration of democracy, which doesn’t quite belong into here but it does, because that’s the only, hope that we have, for overcoming the crisis and in for [inaudible] public taking control of their fate, if that doesn’t happen, we are doomed. If we are leaving our fate to sociopathic buffoons, we’re finished. And that’s coming close, Trump is the worst, that’s because of US Power, which is overwhelming. We are talking about U.S decline, but you just look at the world, you don’t see that when the U.S imposes sanctions, murderers, devastating sanctions, that’s the only country that can do that, but everyone has to follow. Europe may not like, in fact hate [sanctions / actions ???] on Iran, but they have to follow, they have to follow the master, or else they get kicked out of the international financial system. Thats not a law of nature it’s a decision in Europe to be subordinate to the master in Washington, other countries don’t even have a choice. And back to the Coronavirus, one of the most shocking, harsh aspects of it, is the use of sanctions, to maximize the pain, perfectly consciously, Iran is in a zone, enormous internal problems. [inaudible] By the stranglehold of tightening sanctions, which are consciously designed, openly, to make the suffer and suffer bitterly now. Cuba has been suffering from it, from the moment, where it gained independence, but it’s astonishing, that they have survived but they stayed resilient and one of the most ironic elements of today’s virus crisis, is that Cuba is helping Europe. I mean this is so shocking, that you don’t know how to describe it. That Germany can’t help Greece, but Cuba can help the European countries. If you stop to think about [inaudible] what that means, all the words fail, just as when you see thousands of people dying in the Mediterranean, fleeing from a region, that has been devastated for centuries and being sent to the deaths in the Mediterranean, you don’t know what words to use. The crisis, the civilizational crisis of the West at this point is devastating, to think of them and it does bring up childhood memories of listening to Hitler raving on the radio to raucous crowds [inaudible] at the nuremburg rallies it makes you wonder if this species is even viable.”

 

 

Internationally renowned intellectual Noam Chomsky in conversation with National Observer founding editor-in-chief Linda Solomon Wood about the COVID-19 politics, the global economy and the environment.

The Windmills of Your Mind – Noel Harrison

Noel Harrison sings the Oscar winning classic, the Windmills of Your Mind, from the Thomas Crown Affair film.

Listen To My Radio : http://myradiostream.com/radiomethexis The windmills of your mind : Alison Moyet (Michel Jean Legrand) Video : scenes from The Thomas Crown Affair (1968) Music and video, are property and copyright of it’s owners Lyrics are provided for educational purposes only

Referring to some Observations in the recent Uta Diaries

I started yesterday morning with looking at some of my drafts and I decided it was about time that I should get rid of all the drafts that I did not need anymore. The first draft I looked at I wanted to publish rather than seeing it ending in ‘trash’. I love Di Morrissey’s books and am very impressed that she is able to write a comprehensive well researched novel every year. She wrote already 27 novels. I believe most of these are bestsellers. Here is what I found in Wikipedia:

“Di Morrissey AM is one of the most successful novelists of Australia with 27 best-selling novels and five children’s books published. Wikipedia

Here you can find out more:  http://dimorrissey.com.au/about-di/

 

 

And I referred to this video in yesterday’s diary:

“Jennifer Byrne presents an interview with Bryce Courtenay, Lee Child, Di Morrissey, and Matthew Riley.”

 

I always liked to watch and listen to the Jennifer Byrne interviews. Bryce Courtnenay’s books I used to be very familiar with over many years. I still own some of his books. Wouldn’t I like to read again and again these books: Maybe, maybe one of these days when due to the Coronavirus I am going to have lots of spare time, I am going to read, read, read!

Further on yesterday I published this item about how migrant workers had to clean up university students’ mess. So what I had observed about the life of cleaners during my long life, this is what I really had wanted to write about.

In my following diary posts I mentioned about the help that my family used to be able to afford. Some people were actually honorary helpers, like Tante Mietze who for many years lived with Peter’s family and tirelessly did all sorts of work for the family right into very old age. She was a real jewel and all the family still hold her in high esteem many years after her death.

I guess that most people cannot afford hired help any more these days, is partly because cleaners and all sorts of workers can these days demand higher wages. If for instance people employ migrant workers and try to underpay them, it is said they are being used as ‘slave’ labour.

I always had this opinion when in a family with several children both father and mother have outside well paying jobs, the wife’s salary should in the first place be used to employ some home help. Why else would a woman want to have an outside job if it did not pay enough for some home help? Now, I would very much like my readers’ thoughts on this. Please, do not hesitate to make a comment, when you do not agree with my opinion on this.

Another topic would be how do families cope these days with separation or divorce of parents, and how do wives fare then if they do not have a well paying job.