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Sunday before Mother’s Day 2018

6 May

We left at 10,30 for a 50 km drive to Berry. On the way we had to drive through Albion Park Rail. This delayed us somewhat for there was an airshow on at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Lots of people had already parked all over the area, and quite a few people were still arriving looking for more parking spots quite some distance away and then walking to where the action was. We saw heaps and heaps of cars and hundreds and hundreds of walkers!

https://www.wingsoverillawarra.com.au/page/flying-program

 

 

https://www.wingsoverillawarra.com.au/page/location

“Illawarra Regional Airport is located adjacent to the Princes Highway at Albion Park Rail in NSW, approximately 20kms south of Wollongong City Centre and 100kms south of Sydney City Centre.”

Once we made it through Albion Park Rail on the Princes Highway, we had a good run further south to Berry.

We had no idea that in Berry was a show on too. I looked it up now, it was the

NATIONAL MOTORING HERITAGE DAY AT BERRY SHOWGROUND

https://www.visitnsw.com/destinations/south-coast/jervis-bay-and-shoalhaven/berry/events/national-motoring-heritage-day-berry

I have never seen as many people and cars in the vicinity of Berry. But we were lucky. Peter found a very convenient parking spot near here:

DSCN4238

DSCN4237

We had some lovely ice-cream and were sitting outside with it. We only had to walk a little bit further to find a beautiful outside cafe and there was no problem at all to get a table. The coffee we ordered was very good. The weather was just perfect:  Sunshine the whole time and no wind whatsoever.

At  the French Bakery across the road Peter bought a cinnamon scroll and a baguette. Then we drove back home, where we warmed the cinnamon scroll up in the oven and then had it at a table in our backyard with a cup of tea.

The whole outing took us only 2  and a half hours.

 

 

A very interesting Interview on Radio National and my Thoughts on Martin Seligman’s PERMA

18 Apr

From our daughter in Sydney we received the following link about a very interesting interview on Radio National:

http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/lifematters/martin-seligman-on-hope-and-helplessness/9653834

Peter and I listened to this interview. It was very interesting to hear Martin Seligman speak about his work. Of special interest to me were his explanations about what PERMA is. I looked up several  articles about it. I also sent some  links to our son in Victoria.

https://www.gostrengths.com/whatisperma/

What is PERMA?

The technical definition

PERMA is an acronym for a model of well-being put forth by a pioneer in the field of positive psychology, Martin Seligman. According to Seligman, PERMA makes up five important building blocks of well-being and happiness:

  • Positive emotions – feeling good
  • Engagement – being completely absorbed in activities
  • Relationships – being authentically connected to others
  • Meaning – purposeful existence
  • Achievement – a sense of accomplishment and success

MY THOUGHTS ABOUT POSITIVE EMOTIONS:

I DO FIND IT VERY INTERESTING WHAT MARTIN SELIGMAN SAYS ABOUT POSITIVE EMOTIONS. IT SEEMS TO BE VERY IMPORTANT THAT EDUCATORS FOSTER POSITIVE EMOTIONS IN CHILDREN.  WHEN WE MOVED TO AUSTRALIA WE WERE AMAZED TO FIND THAT LITTLE CHILDREN AT SCHOOL WERE CONSTANTLY BEING PRAISED FOR SOMETHING OR OTHER. IN OUR EXPERIENCE OUR UPBRINGING IN GERMANY DID NOT EVENTUATE WITH A LOT OF PRAISE FOR EVERY CHILD.

I WOULD AGREE THAT BEING COMPLETELY ABSORBED IN ACTIVITIES IS A GOOD THING. I  IMAGINE IT SHOULD BE POSSIBLE TO FIND FOR EVERY CHILD ACTIVITIES THEY LIKE SO MUCH THAT THEY CAN BE COMPLETELY  ABSORBING FOR  THE CHILD.

I THINK EVERYONE WOULD AGREE THAT FOR A CHILD IT IS EXTREMELY IMPORTANT TO FEEL CONNECTED TO OTHERS

AND IF A CHILD FEELS CONNECTED TO OTHERS FOR SURE THEY WOULD ALSO FEEL THAT THEIR EXISTENCE IS IMPORTANT TO OTHERS.

A CHILD WOULD GET A FEELING OF ACCOMPLISHMENT AND SUCCESS IF IT KNEW THAT THERE ARE THINGS HE OR SHE CAN DO WELL OR WELL  ENOUGH  TO BE ABLE TO EVENTUALLY BE GETTING BETTER AND BETTER ON IT.

CHILDREN THAT ARE BROUGHT UP WITH POSITIVE EMOTIONS LIKE THIS MAY FIND IT MORE EASY TO SUSTAIN POSITIVE EMOTIONS THROUGH OUT THEIR LIVES.

IF SOMEONE DID GROW UP WITH INSUFFICIENT POSITIVE EMOTIONS HE OR SHE MIGHT BENEFIT ENORMOUSLY BY LEARNING ABOUT THE CONCEPT OF SELIGMAN’S PERMA AND WORKING ON IT TO BECOME A HAPPY ADULT AND FEELING GOOD MOST  OF THE TIME.

I THINK I AM ONE OF THOSE LUCKY PEOPLE WHO FEEL GOOD MOST OF THE TIME. BUT THIS DOES NOT MEAN THAT I HAVE NOT FELT BAD AT CERTAIN TIMES DURING MY VERY LONG LIFE. YET I DID  ALWAYS FEEL THAT THERE IS A SLIVER LINING NOT TOO FAR AWAY. ONCE A WOMAN SAID TO ME THAT GOD DOES NOT MAKE RUBBISH. I FELT PRETTY WORTHLESS AT THE TIME. BUT WHAT THIS WOMAN SAID SOMEHOW MADE A LOT OF SENSE TO ME. DEEP DOWN MY BELIEVE HAS ALWAYS BEEN THAT EVERY PERSON HAS SOME KIND OF WORTH, AND THAT I SHOULD NOT THINK THAT I AM WORTHLESS.

Oh Boy, Movie Trailer

18 Apr

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1954701/videoplayer/vi4043421721?ref_=tt_ov_vi

“This tragicomedy is a self-ironic portrait of a young man who drops out of university and ends up wandering the streets of the city he lives in: Berlin. The film deals with the desire to participate in life and the difficulty to find one’s place.”

Seligman’s PERMA Model

18 Apr

‘Well-being cannot exist just in your own head. Well-being is a combination of feeling good as well as actually having meaning, good relationships and accomplishment.’
― Martin E.P. Seligman

https://positivepsychologyprogram.com/perma-model/#apply-perma-model

Welcome to Australia’s plastic beach

16 Apr

Published on Apr 15, 2018

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How much rubbish could you collect from a suburban beach in 30 minutes? You may find the answer confronting. Guardian Australia joins Paul Sharp and Silke Stuckenbrock from the Two Hands Project to see just how prevalent plastics are on Australia’s beaches.

THIS LAND IS MY LAND

27 Mar

 

Published on Sep 8, 2009

To register for the 2015 course, visit https://www.edx.org/course/justice-ha…. PART ONE: THIS LAND IS MY LAND The philosopher John Locke believes that individuals have certain rights so fundamental that no government can ever take them away. These rights—to life, liberty and property—were given to us as human beings in the the state of nature, a time before government and laws were created. According to Locke, our natural rights are governed by the law of nature, known by reason, which says that we can neither give them up nor take them away from anyone else. Sandel wraps up the lecture by raising a question: what happens to our natural rights once we enter society and consent to a system of laws? PART TWO: CONSENTING ADULTS If we all have unalienable rights to life, liberty, and property, how can a government enforce tax laws passed by the representatives of a mere majority? Doesnt that amount to taking some peoples property without their consent? Lockes response is that we give our tacit consent to obey the tax laws passed by a majority when we choose to live in a society. Therefore, taxation is legitimate and compatible with individual rights, as long as it applies to everyone and does not arbitrarily single anyone out.

A hypothetical scenario by Professor Michael Sandel

27 Mar

Published on Sep 4, 2009

PART ONE: THE MORAL SIDE OF MURDER If you had to choose between (1) killing one person to save the lives of five others and (2) doing nothing even though you knew that five people would die right before your eyes if you did nothing—what would you do? What would be the right thing to do? Thats the hypothetical scenario Professor Michael Sandel uses to launch his course on moral reasoning. After the majority of students votes for killing the one person in order to save the lives of five others, Sandel presents three similar moral conundrums—each one artfully designed to make the decision more difficult. As students stand up to defend their conflicting choices, it becomes clear that the assumptions behind our moral reasoning are often contradictory, and the question of what is right and what is wrong is not always black and white.