What happens if Ukraine’s Zaporizhzhia nuclear plant explodes?

News|Russia-Ukraine war

While an explosion is not impossible, experts say the greatest concern is in the leak of radiation that could come as a result of the Russia-Ukraine war.

Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Plant near Enerhodar
A serviceman with a Russian flag on his uniform stands guard near the Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Plant [File:Reuters]

By Elizabeth Melimopoulos

Published On 11 Aug 202211 Aug 2022

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has raised alarms about the shelling that is taking place at the Russian-controlled Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant in Ukraine, saying the current situation poses a great risk and could lead to a “nuclear disaster”.

Both Russia and Ukraine have accused each other of attacking the plant and of “nuclear terrorism”, with the IAEA urging “utmost restraint” around the site.

KEEP READING

list of 3 itemslist 1 of 3

Civilians killed as Russia intensifies attacks across Ukraine

list 2 of 3

World one misstep from ‘nuclear annihilation’: UN chief

list 3 of 3

Russia forces seize Ukraine nuclear plant after fire is put out

end of list

Here is what we know so far about the situation.

Where is Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant and why is it important?

  • Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant is the largest plant in Europe and among the 10 largest in the world; it generates half of Ukraine’s nuclear-derived power.
  • The plant has a total capacity of about 6,000 megawatts, enough for about four million homes.
  • It is located in the southern Ukrainian steppe on the Dnieper River, some 550km (342 miles) southeast of Ukraine’s capital, Kyiv, and about 525km (325 miles) south of Chernobyl, the site of the world’s worst nuclear power plant accident in 1986.
  • Currently, the plant is operated by Ukrainian staff but Russian military units guard the facility.
  • According to the IAEA, the plant has six Soviet-designed water-cooled reactors containing uranium 235, each of which has a net capacity of 950 megawatts. A megawatt of capacity will provide energy for 400 to 900 homes in a year.
  • Zaporizhzhia plant is also located about 200km (125 miles) from Crimea, which Russia annexed in 2014.
  • On Tuesday, Ukrainian operator Energoatom said the Russian forces occupying the area were preparing to “connect the plant to the Crimean electricity grid”.
  • Michael Black, the director of the Centre of Nuclear Engineering at Imperial College London, told Al Jazeera that the main concern is that connecting the plant to the Crimean electricity grid could interrupt the offsite power to the reactors. “You need that power to provide cooling to the reactors … As long as [those generators] function, then everything is fine,” he said.
  • “It’s encouraging to see that the Russians want to use the electricity; that does imply that they don’t want to damage [the power plant],” he added.
INTERACTIVE - Nuclear power in Ukraine August 2022

What has the IAEA said?

  • Rafael Mariano Grossi, director-general of the IAEA, described the situation as “completely out of control” in an interview with The Associated Press last week.
  • “Every principle of nuclear safety has been violated” at the plant, Grossi said. “What is at stake is extremely serious and extremely grave and dangerous.”
  • During the interview, he said the physical integrity of the plant was not respected and the supply chain was interrupted, so it was not certain the plant was getting all it needs, “and there is a lot of nuclear material there to be inspected”.
  • In a statement released on Tuesday, Grossi said he was preparing to brief the UN Security Council about the nuclear safety in the plant on Thursday and his efforts to agree and lead an expert mission to the site as soon as possible.
  • The IAEA has been trying for months to send an inspection team to the nuclear plant but it has not been successful.
  • The watchdog also said on Tuesday that Ukraine had informed the IAEA about the restoration of a power line that can be used to supply the plant with electricity from a nearby thermal power plant if needed.
  • “This external power line is necessary to safeguard the proper cooling of the facility.
  • Grossi outlined the need for a secure offsite power supply as one of the seven nuclear safety pillars at the beginning of the conflict.

Given the IAEA’s warnings, could the plant explode – and if so – what would happen?

  • According to experts, this is possible but the likelihood of that taking place is not certain.
  • “What we have here with the military involvement is very difficult … If multiple catastrophic factors come together, an explosion might be possible,” Ross Peel, the Research and Knowledge Transfer Manager for the Centre for Science and Security Studies at King’s College London, told Al Jazeera.
  • “It’s difficult to say whether this will [happen] and the possible consequences of that, what they might be. It depends how the explosion comes about,” he added.
  • There are concerns about the shelling occurring around the facility, with the potential to damage critical infrastructure, including the reactors.
  • “Reactors [need] to be constantly cooled by water passing through [them,]” MV Ramana, a professor at the University of British Columbia’s School of Public Policy and Global Affairs, told Al Jazeera.
  • “If that water stream is cut out, cut down, cut off in some fashion, then the reactor could lose cooling, the fuel will start melting. It will sort of create high pressure, and the thing can explode,” he added.
  • In the immediate aftermath of an explosion, experts say that we could likely see widespread evacuations caused by an invisible radioactive cloud. However, the impact of a leak in radiation would probably be felt for years to come
  • “You’re probably going to see hundreds of thousands of people trying to flee from that area,” Ramana told Al Jazeera.
  • “There will be a cloud, but you’re not going to be able to see it … We’re able to track the cloud because [we] have sensitive instruments that are measuring radiation levels,” he added.
  • Some of the illnesses we could see from an explosion similar to this could be acute radiation poisoning or cancers that could be seen later.
  • “So, for instance, at Chernobyl, the people who were going into the reactor to actually stand on top of the burning building and put the fire out were exposed to huge amounts of radiation and suffered the impacts of that within hours,” Ross said.
  • “People who are exposed to not quite so great amounts may still suffer from acute radiation poisoning and recover. This happens over days to weeks, maybe months. For people exposed to lower levels of radiation, there may be greater numbers of cancer cases coming later over the following years to decades,” he added.
A view shows the Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Plant in the course of Ukraine-Russia conflict outside the Russian-controlled city of Enerhodar in the Zaporizhzhia region, Ukraine August 4, 2022. REUTERS/Alexander Ermochenko
The Zaporizhzhia plant is operated by Ukrainian staff, but Russian military units guard the facility [File: Reuters]

What other scenarios could take place?

  • Rather than a reactor core explosion, experts are more concerned about damage to systems that cool the spent fuel pool and the reactors. If the cooling fails, this could lead to an uncontrolled heat buildup, a meltdown and a fire that could release and spread radiation from the containment structures.
  • “We’re mostly scared of radiation release, not necessarily of an explosion,” Amelie Stoetzel, a PhD Student in the Department of War Studies at King’s College London, told Al Jazeera.
  •  “Even though that looks scary, [a] radiation release, in any case, would be catastrophic,” she added.
  •  “It’s unpredictable; we don’t really know where the plume [containing radioactive material] would go; it can go anywhere really, depending on the weather conditions.”
  • Due to the plant’s geographical location, a radiation release could hit any part of the European continent.
  • “Zaporizhzhia is in the middle of the continent. So no matter which way the wind is blowing, somebody’s going to get contaminated,” Ramana said.
  • Overall, experts emphasise that any kind of prediction is hard to make at this stage.
  • “The only certainty we have really is that the military activity around the nuclear power plant poses a risk to it. And how exactly that will play out is, is very difficult to predict,” Ross said.

If there is a radiation leak, what happens next?

  • Experts expect immediate evacuations but also difficulties in accessing medical facilities since they will probably see a surge in patients.
  • “When there were incidents of radiation accidents, there were a lot of people that showed up with symptoms of radiation poisoning, even though they had not been exposed, due to fear and panic,” Stoetzel said.
  • Experts also said that evacuations in a war zone will come with their own set of complications.
  • “A lot of people have already left the area, but there are still a lot of people left behind,” Stoetzel said.
  • “So yes, there would be a lot of people rushing to hospitals and rushing to get out of the area, which would be a problem … there would be confusion; in an ongoing war, evacuating people is extremely difficult,” she added.
  • According to experts, for many people, the fear of radiation could be more dangerous than the radiation itself.
  • “We could see an uptick in patients because of the psychological symptoms that are connected to the knowledge that radiation might have leaked from a nuclear power plant nearby,”
  • “So actually the most problematic issue for the government at least would be how to deal with a large number of patients,” she added.
  • In case of an explosion, or a fire, a leak of radiation could lead to a “long-term disaster”.
  • “It’s not something where people are going to be exposed to it and immediately fall down and die … there’s going to be a huge, psychological toll, right on top of the psychological toll of the war itself,”  Ramana said.


Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Plant near Enerhodar
A serviceman with a Russian flag on his uniform stands guard near the Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Plant [File:Reuters]

By Elizabeth Melimopoulos

Published On 11 Aug 202211 Aug 2022

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has raised alarms about the shelling that is taking place at the Russian-controlled Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant in Ukraine, saying the current situation poses a great risk and could lead to a “nuclear disaster”.

Both Russia and Ukraine have accused each other of attacking the plant and of “nuclear terrorism”, with the IAEA urging “utmost restraint” around the site.

KEEP READING

list of 3 itemslist 1 of 3

Ci

list 2 of 3

World one misstep from ‘nuclear annihilation’: UN chief

list 3 of 3

Russia forces seize Ukraine nuclear plant after fire is put out

end of list

Here is what we know so far about the situation.

Where is Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant and why is it important?

  • Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant is the largest plant in Europe and among the 10 largest in the world; it generates half of Ukraine’s nuclear-derived power.
  • The plant has a total capacity of about 6,000 megawatts, enough for about four million homes.
  • It is located in the southern Ukrainian steppe on the Dnieper River, some 550km (342 miles) southeast of Ukraine’s capital, Kyiv, and about 525km (325 miles) south of Chernobyl, the site of the world’s worst nuclear power plant accident in 1986.
  • Currently, the plant is operated by Ukrainian staff but Russian military units guard the facility.
  • According to the IAEA, the plant has six Soviet-designed water-cooled reactors containing uranium 235, each of which has a net capacity of 950 megawatts. A megawatt of capacity will provide energy for 400 to 900 homes in a year.
  • Zaporizhzhia plant is also located about 200km (125 miles) from Crimea, which Russia annexed in 2014.
  • On Tuesday, Ukrainian operator Energoatom said the Russian forces occupying the area were preparing to “connect the plant to the Crimean electricity grid”.
  • Michael Black, the director of the Centre of Nuclear Engineering at Imperial College London, told Al Jazeera that the main concern is that connecting the plant to the Crimean electricity grid could interrupt the offsite power to the reactors. “You need that power to provide cooling to the reactors … As long as [those generators] function, then everything is fine,” he said.
  • “It’s encouraging to see that the Russians want to use the electricity; that does imply that they don’t want to damage [the power plant],” he added.
INTERACTIVE - Nuclear power in Ukraine August 2022

What has the IAEA said?

  • Rafael Mariano Grossi, director-general of the IAEA, described the situation as “completely out of control” in an interview with The Associated Press last week.
  • “Every principle of nuclear safety has been violated” at the plant, Grossi said. “What is at stake is extremely serious and extremely grave and dangerous.”
  • During the interview, he said the physical integrity of the plant was not respected and the supply chain was interrupted, so it was not certain the plant was getting all it needs, “and there is a lot of nuclear material there to be inspected”.
  • In a statement released on Tuesday, Grossi said he was preparing to brief the UN Security Council about the nuclear safety in the plant on Thursday and his efforts to agree and lead an expert mission to the site as soon as possible.
  • The IAEA has been trying for months to send an inspection team to the nuclear plant but it has not been successful.
  • The watchdog also said on Tuesday that Ukraine had informed the IAEA about the restoration of a power line that can be used to supply the plant with electricity from a nearby thermal power plant if needed.
  • “This external power line is necessary to safeguard the proper cooling of the facility.
  • Grossi outlined the need for a secure offsite power supply as one of the seven nuclear safety pillars at the beginning of the conflict.

Given the IAEA’s warnings, could the plant explode – and if so – what would happen?

  • According to experts, this is possible but the likelihood of that taking place is not certain.
  • “What we have here with the military involvement is very difficult … If multiple catastrophic factors come together, an explosion might be possible,” Ross Peel, the Research and Knowledge Transfer Manager for the Centre for Science and Security Studies at King’s College London, told Al Jazeera.
  • “It’s difficult to say whether this will [happen] and the possible consequences of that, what they might be. It depends how the explosion comes about,” he added.
  • There are concerns about the shelling occurring around the facility, with the potential to damage critical infrastructure, including the reactors.
  • “Reactors [need] to be constantly cooled by water passing through [them,]” MV Ramana, a professor at the University of British Columbia’s School of Public Policy and Global Affairs, told Al Jazeera.
  • “If that water stream is cut out, cut down, cut off in some fashion, then the reactor could lose cooling, the fuel will start melting. It will sort of create high pressure, and the thing can explode,” he added.
  • In the immediate aftermath of an explosion, experts say that we could likely see widespread evacuations caused by an invisible radioactive cloud. However, the impact of a leak in radiation would probably be felt for years to come
  • “You’re probably going to see hundreds of thousands of people trying to flee from that area,” Ramana told Al Jazeera.
  • “There will be a cloud, but you’re not going to be able to see it … We’re able to track the cloud because [we] have sensitive instruments that are measuring radiation levels,” he added.
  • Some of the illnesses we could see from an explosion similar to this could be acute radiation poisoning or cancers that could be seen later.
  • “So, for instance, at Chernobyl, the people who were going into the reactor to actually stand on top of the burning building and put the fire out were exposed to huge amounts of radiation and suffered the impacts of that within hours,” Ross said.
  • “People who are exposed to not quite so great amounts may still suffer from acute radiation poisoning and recover. This happens over days to weeks, maybe months. For people exposed to lower levels of radiation, there may be greater numbers of cancer cases coming later over the following years to decades,” he added.
A view shows the Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Plant in the course of Ukraine-Russia conflict outside the Russian-controlled city of Enerhodar in the Zaporizhzhia region, Ukraine August 4, 2022. REUTERS/Alexander Ermochenko
The Zaporizhzhia plant is operated by Ukrainian staff, but Russian military units guard the facility [File: Reuters]

What other scenarios could take place?

  • Rather than a reactor core explosion, experts are more concerned about damage to systems that cool the spent fuel pool and the reactors. If the cooling fails, this could lead to an uncontrolled heat buildup, a meltdown and a fire that could release and spread radiation from the containment structures.
  • “We’re mostly scared of radiation release, not necessarily of an explosion,” Amelie Stoetzel, a PhD Student in the Department of War Studies at King’s College London, told Al Jazeera.
  •  “Even though that looks scary, [a] radiation release, in any case, would be catastrophic,” she added.
  •  “It’s unpredictable; we don’t really know where the plume [containing radioactive material] would go; it can go anywhere really, depending on the weather conditions.”
  • Due to the plant’s geographical location, a radiation release could hit any part of the European continent.
  • “Zaporizhzhia is in the middle of the continent. So no matter which way the wind is blowing, somebody’s going to get contaminated,” Ramana said.
  • Overall, experts emphasise that any kind of prediction is hard to make at this stage.
  • “The only certainty we have really is that the military activity around the nuclear power plant poses a risk to it. And how exactly that will play out is, is very difficult to predict,” Ross said.

If there is a radiation leak, what happens next?

  • Experts expect immediate evacuations but also difficulties in accessing medical facilities since they will probably see a surge in patients.
  • “When there were incidents of radiation accidents, there were a lot of people that showed up with symptoms of radiation poisoning, even though they had not been exposed, due to fear and panic,” Stoetzel said.
  • Experts also said that evacuations in a war zone will come with their own set of complications.
  • “A lot of people have already left the area, but there are still a lot of people left behind,” Stoetzel said.
  • “So yes, there would be a lot of people rushing to hospitals and rushing to get out of the area, which would be a problem … there would be confusion; in an ongoing war, evacuating people is extremely difficult,” she added.
  • According to experts, for many people, the fear of radiation could be more dangerous than the radiation itself.
  • “We could see an uptick in patients because of the psychological symptoms that are connected to the knowledge that radiation might have leaked from a nuclear power plant nearby,”
  • “So actually the most problematic issue for the government at least would be how to deal with a large number of patients,” she added.
  • In case of an explosion, or a fire, a leak of radiation could lead to a “long-term disaster”.
  • “It’s not something where people are going to be exposed to it and immediately fall down and die … there’s going to be a huge, psychological toll, right on top of the psychological toll of the war itself,”  Ramana said.


A view shows the Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Plant in the course of Ukraine-Russia conflict outside the Russian-controlled city of Enerhodar in the Zaporizhzhia region, Ukraine August 4, 2022. REUTERS/Alexander Ermochenko
The Zaporizhzhia plant is operated by Ukrainian staff, but Russian military units guard the facility [File: Reuters]

What other scenarios could take place?

  • Rather than a reactor core explosion, experts are more concerned about damage to systems that cool the spent fuel pool and the reactors. If the cooling fails, this could lead to an uncontrolled heat buildup, a meltdown and a fire that could release and spread radiation from the containment structures.
  • “We’re mostly scared of radiation release, not necessarily of an explosion,” Amelie Stoetzel, a PhD Student in the Department of War Studies at King’s College London, told Al Jazeera.
  •  “Even though that looks scary, [a] radiation release, in any case, would be catastrophic,” she added.
  •  “It’s unpredictable; we don’t really know where the plume [containing radioactive material] would go; it can go anywhere really, depending on the weather conditions.”
  • Due to the plant’s geographical location, a radiation release could hit any part of the European continent.
  • “Zaporizhzhia is in the middle of the continent. So no matter which way the wind is blowing, somebody’s going to get contaminated,” Ramana said.
  • Overall, experts emphasise that any kind of prediction is hard to make at this stage.
  • “The only certainty we have really is that the military activity around the nuclear power plant poses a risk to it. And how exactly that will play out is, is very difficult to predict,” Ross said.

If there is a radiation leak, what happens next?

  • Experts expect immediate evacuations but also difficulties in accessing medical facilities since they will probably see a surge in patients.
  • “When there were incidents of radiation accidents, there were a lot of people that showed up with symptoms of radiation poisoning, even though they had not been exposed, due to fear and panic,” Stoetzel said.
  • Experts also said that evacuations in a war zone will come with their own set of complications.
  • “A lot of people have already left the area, but there are still a lot of people left behind,” Stoetzel said.
  • “So yes, there would be a lot of people rushing to hospitals and rushing to get out of the area, which would be a problem … there would be confusion; in an ongoing war, evacuating people is extremely difficult,” she added.
  • According to experts, for many people, the fear of radiation could be more dangerous than the radiation itself.
  • “We could see an uptick in patients because of the psychological symptoms that are connected to the knowledge that radiation might have leaked from a nuclear power plant nearby,”
  • “So actually the most problematic issue for the government at least would be how to deal with a large number of patients,” she added.
  • In case of an explosion, or a fire, a leak of radiation could lead to a “long-term disaster”.
  • “It’s not something where people are going to be exposed to it and immediately fall down and die … there’s going to be a huge, psychological toll, right on top of the psychological toll of the war itself,”  Ramana said.




P

Climate Change Progress

Great changes are going to come, this is what I think.

Lew Bornmann's Blog

It seems to me….

The specter of climate change threatens worsening natural disasters, rapid urbanization, forced migration, and economic hardship for the most vulnerable.  Despite significant global advances, inability to effectively address epidemics and health emergencies still prevail and continuously threaten global health security and economic development.”  ~ Tedros Adhanom[1].

After several decades characterized by misinformation and prevarication concerning the veracity of climate change, governments are now acceding to the warnings from climate scientists and their learning experience as a result of the rapidly increasing number of extreme weather events.

But there is a current corresponding absence of substantive climate-related action – which has very little to do with a need for additional technological innovation[2]. While world political leaders seem to have jointly entered into a totally senseless fossil fuel suicide pact, the actual problem is more of a consistent lack of political will…

View original post 1,919 more words

Grease star and Australian music icon Olivia Newton-John dead at 73 

1.68M subscribersSUBSCRIBEMessages posted to her official social media accounts said the singer “passed away peacefully” at her ranch in southern California surrounded by family and friends. Subscribe: http://ab.co/1svxLVE Read more here: https://ab.co/3SAwBMd ABC News provides around the clock coverage of news events as they break in Australia and abroad, including the latest coronavirus pandemic updates. It’s news when you want it, from Australia’s most trusted news organisation.

This LIFE ADVICE Will Leave You Speechless! (CHANGE EVERYTHING) | Muniba Mazari


Lewis Howes

Download podcast episodes a week early here! – http://www.lewishowes.com/pod Muniba Mazari is an artist, a global Motivational Speaker, humanitarian, Pakistan’s first wheelchair bound Female TV Host, Pakistan’s first wheelchair bound Model and Pakistan’s First Goodwill Ambassador to UNWomen Pakistan. Muniba derives her strength from the tragic car accident that took place in February, 2008 when she was 21 which left her wheelchair bound because of spinal cord injury . Since then, she’s been a pioneering voice heard in different countries around the world. She took a massive decision which gave her a new purpose & meaning to life. That decision was the adoption of her son Nael who is now 11 years old. — If you’re ready to learn more about the importance of solitude, how to practice self-acceptance, develop unconditional self-love, and how to break FREE of others’ expectations once and for all, then this episode is for you! And now, let’s jump right into Episode 1,282 of The School of Greatness.

The Untold History of Ibero America: Empire vs Christian Humanism

Rising Tide Foundation

During the mid-19th century a revolutionary struggle swept across ibero American nations and in the course of several decades monarchical systems of empire that had established themselves across the Americas began to lose their hold on power and a new system of republics were instituted. Certainly this movement cannot be said to be bad as the ideals of “self-government”, “inalienable rights” and the “consent of the governed” contained in these republican struggles are preferable to systems of hereditary power… but the question remains: Why was the hand of British Intelligence so often found helping these anti-spanish revolutionary groups? Were these revolutionary movements as pure as we are told? Could something better have occured had anglo-American imperial intrigue not subverted many of these movements? Similarly, it has become commonplace to label everything done under spanish/portuguese rule prior to the age of revolutions to be entire evil and rapacious. Certainly it cannot be argued that great evils were not done under the helm of such empires, but in embracing such black legends that paint everything pre-revoluationary as totally evil with no redeeming value to be found, are we not also missing the virtuous struggles by Christian humanist movements who fought to do great works of good that reverberate to this day? In this Rising Tide Foundation lecture, Adam Sedia sheds new light on Ibero American history as you’ve never seen it beginning with the fight between oligarchical vs Christian humanist factions of Spain during the days of Columbus and onward to our present age.

Learning to Think Like Mencius in a Time of Crisis

CULTURAL WARFAREPHILOSOPHY

Posted by MATTHEW EHRETon

Full Reading Now Available.

Since ancient times, philosophers have sought the remedy to humanity’s recurrent plunges into war, division, chaos, ignorance and all the moral, temporal and spiritual ills that accompany those disharmonies.

In ancient Greece, this effort was spearheaded by Plato (427-347 BCE) and his school of disciples that applied the methods of their master Socrates (470-399 BCE) to unlocking not only scientific mysteries in astronomy, mechanics, geometry and medicine, but also natural law in the form of the Plato’s ongoing effort to organize philosopher kings capable of raising society to a standard of excellence whereby all citizens and rulers alike could finally access the pathway towards awakening self-understanding, agapic love of truth, beauty and the good and ultimately true happiness.

Paralleling this development many thousands of miles across the world island, the followers of Confucius (551-479 BCE) were engaged in an identical combat but with Chinese characteristics. By the 4th century BCE, this fight was spearheaded by Mencius (372-289 BCE) who worked tirelessly to organize a philosopher king during the dark days of the warring states period who would be capable of uniting the people under a unified state governed by Li (principle), Ren (agape/benevolence) and the Mandate of Heaven (Tian Ming).

Like Plato, whose efforts to educate Dionysius I and II to the status of Philosopher Kings of Syracuse were thwarted in his lifetime, so too did Mencius watch his efforts come undone by lesser souls incapable of seeing a higher reality beyond the limits of their senses. Yet despite these set-backs both philosophers established powerful schools of thought that endured far beyond the bookends of their lives which transmitted their teachings over many generations and which resulted in the greatest leaps of progress, peace, and creativity ever recorded among both eastern and western civilizations.

It is in this spirit that The Rising Tide Foundation is proud to present a new study group led by Dr. Quan Le which plunges into the geopolitical history of ancient China while also exploring the diverse philosophical currents, personalities and more in the form of a series of dialogues composed by the students of Mencius and translated by Professor Robert Eno.

To access the original text of Robert Eno’s translation of the Mencius, click here.

To access Dr. Quan Le’s class: “Plato and Confucius: Spiritual Brothers at Two Ends of the World Island”, click here.

Write to info@risingtidefoundation.net to participate in future lectures and readings

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What I published in April 2021

AuntyUta

Just another WordPress.com site

DIARY

 auntyuta  DiaryLife in AustraliaOld Age  April 2, 2021 3 Minutes

We are in the midst of HOLY WEEK 2021. So tomorrow is GOOD FRIDAY, a holiday. Sitting in front of my house in the early morning sun – this is what I am looking forward to for tomorrow.

I am not looking forward to asking someone for a lift to the MEDICAL CENTRE. Do I really need a change of the dressing on my lower leg? We’ll see.

Sitting in the sun. This is all I am longing for . . . .

Last Sunday I returned from my two weeks holiday at my son’s place in Victoria. With the help of one daughter and one granddaughter I was able to go to the MEDICAL CENTRE on Monday and on Wednesday. I was able to use the ROLLATOR, which was really a great help. Right now, I do not feel confident to walk with my walking stick!

And anyway, I get some more visitors on EASTER SUNDAY. This is in only two more days!

I wonder whether I can adjust to be living totally on my own. My brother reckons, I sound alert on the phone, Then what about my mobility? Has it become better or worse? I would say unfortunately at present it is a lot of the time quite bad. But maybe this has to do with this terrible infection I had in my leg. And this infection may also have to do with my constant tiredness.

Yes, always feeling tired. However when my brother rang from Berlin, my tiredness soon became less and less. After a while it felt good talking to him and his wife.

I like living in my own home. Every Thursday I get two hours home help. There are a lot of plans, that I should get some more help in. Strangely, this makes me feel even more dependent!

Is this kind of dependency really better than living in an AGE CARE HOME? Living in such a home, how would that make me feel?

Maybe I should look into some kind of HOSTEL type accommodation? What a HOSTEL is like, I described in a blog I wrote many years ago.

I had a friend, who lived in a HOSTEL for many years. She died before she needed to be transferred to a NURSING HOME. I think, she was very lucky in this regard. She was 93 when she died.

Well, this was 17 years ago. Maybe what used to be called HOSTEL is now being called AGE CARE HOME. Why then do I have such a horror of ending up in an AGE CARE HOME?

It was acknowledged some time ago. that the house I live in needs a lot of changes and renovations, especially the outside area. I think it would be increasingly difficult for me to look after it even with some extra home help.

Why can’t I just organise everything myself? The two weeks away from home were good for me. I discussed with my son and his friendly neighbour that it would be good for me to join a SENIOR’S CITIZENS CLUB that organises outings and trips to holiday destinations. But since we are not out of the woods yet with COVID 19 maybe this is not such a good idea. Should I just stay as much as possible totally on my own?

What can I still do? I can still shower and dress myself, even if it takes a long time. I can still go for slow walks with my rollator. I have often trouble with my eyesight. However, I can still do some things on the computer and I enjoy some TV programs and listening to music. When I can get hold of a shopping trolley, I can still do my own shopping. I love cooking (mainly vegetarian meals), I have a good appetite and I do not mind doing the dishes. I definitely can do the dishes. I can do my personal washing. The home help on Thursdays hangs out the bigger washing for me and does a lot of the cleaning and sometimes drives me to the shops.

Recently some friends gave me a lift to go to Mass. But I have not contacted them yet since my return from Victoria. A while ago I took up joining my friends again for our Friday afternoon games: Scrabble and Rummy Cub. Well, of course for the last two weeks I was away, and this week on GGOD FRIDAY there won’t be any games.

For the next few days I’ll be sitting as much as possible outside to enjoy some sun, and maybe I can do a bit of walking too with my rollator. If I get sick of being by myself for every meal, I can walk with my rollator across the road to the bowling Club for some lunch. I do like their prawn cutlets!

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DiaryApril 8, 2013In “Diary”

Diary, 10th September 2013September 10, 2013In “Diary”

February DiaryFebruary 23, 2021In “Diary”

Edit”DIARY”

Published by auntyuta

Auntie, Sister. Grandmother, Great-Grandmother, Mother and Wife of German Descent I’ve lived in Australia since 1959 together with my husband Peter. We have four children, eight grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. I started blogging because I wanted to publish some of my childhood memories. I am blogging now also some of my other memories. I like to publish some photos too as well as a little bit of a diary from the present time. Occasionally I publish a story with a bit of fiction in it. Peter, my husband, did publish some of his stories under berlioz1935.wordpress.com View all posts by auntyuta

PublishedApril 2, 2021

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10 thoughts on “DIARY”

  1. catterel EditDear Uta, you are making a huge adjustment in your lufe, and at a time of the year when we all tend to feel a bit pessimistic. You seem to be coping very well under the citcumstances, and as you go through the various stages of grief. What is important in life is to have someone to love and a reason for living – a sense of purpose. From my personal observation of residents in Old People’s Homes, when these were missing the people gave up and died. You have a loving family and friends even if you can’t visit. But I think you are very capable on the computer and can skype or facetime or zoom with your loved ones. You also seem to me to be an optimistic and cheerful person at heart. So much of your life centred on Peter in the last years and it must be very difficult to fill the void left by his passing, but if see this as a challenge I am sure you will eventually find a really worthwhile cause to devote your energies to. And do let others pamper and spoil you when they want to – it helps them to feel good, too. A big hug to you my friend.Reply
    1. auntyuta EditThanks for your big hug, dear Cat. You are right, probably I am a cheerful and optimistic person at heart. There are lots of things I can still enjoy. I just cannot cope with all the dreary stuff. I need someone, who can sort all this out for me. All my children tried to do their best for me. But it is too much for them too. Owning a house that has been not exactly well looked after for a number of years, involves so much work that I am not suited for. Renting a well looked after and maybe somewhat smaller place might perhaps be better for me if there is nobody who can actually live with me in my house. I am the sole owner of the house now, but it is only a headache for me. On the other hand I do love the surroundings of the house, close to nature!I feel a bit like I live in wartime again, wartime when actually most things are put on hold. But somehow it does not make sense to me, since there are a lot of people being newly unemployed because of the virus and some businesses being made redundant, but when it comes to reliable trades people, you can count yourself very lucky indeed to find good, reliable people that work for a reasonable price. Where on earth do I find reliable people like that who do not overcharge? I have no idea. I do need help with that, but so far nobody has come up with any real help. I hate myself for not being able to do a bit more, and then it is hinted, I could perhaps do more if only I put my mind to it.At 86 I feel I am definitely quite close to the end of my life. So really, do I now have to learn to cope with all this stuff that I never in my whole life needed to do before? This computerised world is not my world. A rich person would just employ somebody for doing all these administrative jobs. Maybe I should be such a rich person – Ha, ha!!Thanks again for your lovely hug, dear Cat, and for your very thoughtful and compassionate comment!  Wishing you a very HAPPY EASTER with all your loved ones!Reply
  2. doesitevenmatter3 EditBeautiful photo of the sun shining down in your yard…and in your life!
    Keep taking it one day at a time…you are adjusting to your “new” life and will adjust some more as time goes by.  Keep your sunny attitude and find the joys in each day. 
    Happy Easter to you and your family!!! 
    (((HUGS))) Reply
    1. auntyuta EditHappy Easter to you and your family too, dear Carolyn. 
      By the way, the seat in the picture is at the front of my house, which is really common property. But it has the morning sun, and I like to sit there. Sometimes neighbours approach me there and talk to me. 
      HUGS, Uta Reply
      1. doesitevenmatter3 EditIt’s nice to have a spot to commune with the sun.  Even my little Cooper likes to go outside and lay in the morning sun. 
  3. gerard oosterman EditYou are doing very well, Uta. You had a lifetime with Peter and it takes a brave person to not feel deserted and alone now that he is gone. Grieving takes time and holidays and week-ends are especially hard at times. You just wrote another very good article, straight from the heart. You have a large extended family who love you and care about you. The familiar noises that used to be in your house when you were with Peter are now missing and that silence iisn’t easy to get used to. What was once is now gone and I know too, it is so achingly permanent. When Helvi passed away I applied to social services for a grief counselor and that helped me a lot. Someone to talk to.
    You are lucky to have that sunny spot in your garden. I would sit there a lot and enjoy the warmth. People care about you, Uta.Reply
    1. auntyuta EditGerard, I just read you comment again. You say that it helped you to have someone to talk to. This makes a lot of sense to me. It seems to me too that it is very important to have someone to talk to. It makes me think that maybe having Summah to talk to now, makes a lot of difference to me, for I see Summah twice a week, She stays only for one hour each time, and for most of that hour she does some work in the home or in the garden. But somehow she always manages to spare a bit of time for a little chat. And these chats are not just about my life but about her life too. This makes me feel like she is interested in me as a friend.Reply
  4. auntyuta EditYes, Gerard, I know I am lucky to have an enlarged extended family who love me and care about me. However, I think you’re right in pointing out that grief counselling can be a good thing. In the morning I have sunny spots in the common area in front of the house. Later in the day the sun is at the back of my house in my private backyard! I like to make use of the outdoors! 
    Thanks very much indeed for your insightful comment, Gerard. With all what you’ve been through you have so much insight. So, thanks very much! I wish you all the Best. Have a great Easter! 
    Hugs, Uta Reply
  5. J Taratuta EditOne day at a time, my dear. Hope you have a great Easter!Reply
    1. auntyuta EditYes, thank you!