The Whitlam Government

https://theaimn.com/the-anglo-american-ambush-of-the-whitlam-government-11-11-1975/

Prophetically, in a sense, Whitlam placed an epigraph to his record of The Whitlam Government, 1972-1975 (1985). It reads as follows:

“And one has to reflect that there is nothing more difficult to handle nor more doubtful of success nor more dangerous to conduct than to make oneself the leader in introducing a new order of things. For the man who introduces it has for enemies all those who do well out of the old order and has lukewarm supporters in all those who will do well out of the new order.

The lukewarmness arises partly from fear of their adversaries who have the laws on their side and partly from the incredulity of mankind who do not put their trust in changes if they do not see them in actual practice. Thus it arises that whenever those who are enemies have the opportunity to go on the attack they do so forcefully and the others put up a lukewarm defence, so putting themselves and their cause at risk at the same time” (from Niccolò Machiavelli (1469-1527), The Prince, at Chapter Six).

But such was the wisdom of the hindsight.

‘Tax the rich’: one man’s hard truth comments at Davos go viral  

https://www.smh.com.au/world/europe/tax-the-rich-one-man-s-hard-truth-comments-at-davos-go-viral-20190131-p50uot.html

“Rutger Bregman, the Dutch writer whose 2017 book Utopia for Realists caused a stir by arguing for universal basic income, a 15-hour week and the elimination of borders, is not the only person to criticise the World Economic Forum for elitist hypocrisy.”

Wednesday, 20 February,2019: The moving of a motion in the Australian Parliament on this day

Updated 

15:01

 

I think  Jim Chalmers, being only forty years and a very impressive speaker, might become quite an asset for the Labor Party in the Australian Parliament. You can have a look here about the two books he has written so far:

https://auntielive.wordpress.com/2019/02/20/jim-chalmers-makes-the-case-for-a-fair-go/

 

Alone in Berlin – Everyone Dies Alone: YouTube Video



Today we watched this movie with Hildegard Knef.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Everyone_Dies_Alone

Hans Fallada’s book is based on a true story, and this film was made based on Fallada’s book. We saw the film in German. When I say German, I would like to point out, most actors spoke with a very strong Berlin dialect! The acting was very good. However some of the characters in this story are so disgusting that it is hard to watch them. And these very disgusting characters were the ones in powerful positions and the more gentle and better educated characters were always powerless to do anything against the most horrible excesses of those in power. The film shows what happens to simple, not very well educated people that just lead an ordinary life when for some reason they object to how the regime treats them – in this case the Nazi regime.

This movie is set into 1940 in Berlin. Maybe at the time the majority of the population would not have objected much to the way the war was handled by the Nazis. They may have still believed that it was important to support all the war efforts. The propaganda was, that you had to make sacrifices for the good of the nation. If your son died in battle, even if it was your only son, you should be proud of him that he died a war hero. And so on. Only slowly, after several years of war, more and more people would regard this continuing war as madness and wanting to protest against it. It was common knowledge that any protesters would be severely punished. The resistance fighters would have been well aware that protesting against the regime could mean certain death if they were caught.

Jeder stirbt für sich allein Trailer German Deutsch: Alone in Berlin Trailer)

Diary

http://www.newworldencyclopedia.org/entry/German_reunification

The end of the division (“Die Wende”)

 German reunification (Deutsche Wiedervereinigung) took place on October 3, 1990

So today, the 3rd of October 2018, Germans celebrate the Wiedervereinigung. It is a public holiday in Germany.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peaceful_Revolution#Fall_of_the_Berlin_Wall_and_border_opening

“. . . . Berliners from both sides of the city celebrated at the wall as well as on both sides of the border after 28 years of separation. . . .” This took place from 9 November 1989 on!

In the “Deutsche Welle”  was today an interview with Alexandra Hildebrandt who is the director of the Checkpoint Charlie Museum in Berlin:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexandra_Hildebrandt

This is what I found in Google about Hildebrandt’s pregnancies:

https://translate.google.com.au/translate?hl=en&sl=de&u=https://www.suedtirolnews.it/unterhaltung/wer-haette-das-gedacht/museumschefin-erwartet-mit-58-siebtes-baby

“Friday, October 20, 2017

Berlin – At the age of 58, the museum director of the Berlin Wall Museum, Alexandra Hildebrandt, is expecting her seventh child.

As she confirms to the “Bild”, she looks forward to the seventh child as well as everyone else.

Fifth child in five years

At the calculated date of birth – in January or February – the museum director will be 59 years old. For her, it is already the fifth child within five years. In 2013 she got twins, a daughter in 2014, a small son at the beginning of last year. In addition, Hildebrand has two grown children.

According to the head of the museum, the pregnancy came about in a natural way with her partner, the management consultant Daniel Dormann. Artificial insemination did not need it.

It’s in the family

As she goes on to say, there is a late happiness in the family. Already her grandmother had her last child at the age of 60 years.

For the 58-year-old is the re-pregnancy quite associated with problems. For two months she suffers from chronic bronchitis.”

And here another link:

https://translate.google.com.au/translate?hl=en&sl=de&u=https://www.bz-berlin.de/berlin/alexandra-hildebrandt-57-mit-dem-kinderwagen-zum-traualtar&prev=search

The above link shows a bit more about Hildebrandt’s marriage to Daniel Dormann.

Sunday before Mother’s Day 2018

We left at 10,30 for a 50 km drive to Berry. On the way we had to drive through Albion Park Rail. This delayed us somewhat for there was an airshow on at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Lots of people had already parked all over the area, and quite a few people were still arriving looking for more parking spots quite some distance away and then walking to where the action was. We saw heaps and heaps of cars and hundreds and hundreds of walkers!

https://www.wingsoverillawarra.com.au/page/flying-program

 

 

https://www.wingsoverillawarra.com.au/page/location

“Illawarra Regional Airport is located adjacent to the Princes Highway at Albion Park Rail in NSW, approximately 20kms south of Wollongong City Centre and 100kms south of Sydney City Centre.”

Once we made it through Albion Park Rail on the Princes Highway, we had a good run further south to Berry.

We had no idea that in Berry was a show on too. I looked it up now, it was the

NATIONAL MOTORING HERITAGE DAY AT BERRY SHOWGROUND

https://www.visitnsw.com/destinations/south-coast/jervis-bay-and-shoalhaven/berry/events/national-motoring-heritage-day-berry

I have never seen as many people and cars in the vicinity of Berry. But we were lucky. Peter found a very convenient parking spot near here:

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We had some lovely ice-cream and were sitting outside with it. We only had to walk a little bit further to find a beautiful outside cafe and there was no problem at all to get a table. The coffee we ordered was very good. The weather was just perfect:  Sunshine the whole time and no wind whatsoever.

At  the French Bakery across the road Peter bought a cinnamon scroll and a baguette. Then we drove back home, where we warmed the cinnamon scroll up in the oven and then had it at a table in our backyard with a cup of tea.

The whole outing took us only 2  and a half hours.

 

 

St Peters Church and Cemetery

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Peters_Church,_St_Peters

The following are copies from the Wikipedia:

“St Peters Anglican Church, St Peters, 187-209 Princes Highway, St Peters, is one of the oldest churches in the suburbs of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.[1] Designed by Thomas Bird,[2] the church is sometimes referred to as “St Peters, Cooks River,” as it is located in the Anglican Parish of Cooks River, New South Wales.

The Cooks River, named by James Cook in 1770 when he sailed into Botany Bay, is crossed by the Princes Highway, about 3 kilometres (1.9 mi) to the south of the church. The suburb of St Peters, in which the church is located, was named as a result of the area’s proximity to the church.

The site contains three main buildings (St Peters Church and hall; a former rectory, built in 1906; and the present rectory, built in 1996) and a remnant graveyard.[3] The church building is unique in that it is built of sun-dried bricks with stuccoed finish forming the walls. The surface of the walls are expressed to simulate stonework and have attached buttresses supported on sandstone footings integrated into the sandstone footings of the walls.[3]

The church is listed on the NSW State Heritage Register[4] and the Register of the National Estate.[5]”

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St Peters Church and cemetery. The spire and bell chamber were removed in 1963.

Cemetery

“The first burial in the graveyard, that of John Benfield, a soldier, took place on 4 March 1839,[8] although the graveyard was not consecrated until 26 December 1840.[9] The final burial, that of Sarah Ann Sargent, a widow, took place on 10 April 1896.[8]

In February 1948 an Act of the New South Wales Parliament (Act No. 48 of 1968) was passed authorising the use of the cemetery land for purposes other than a cemetery, including use as a rest park, a garden area and a recreation area.[8] However no action was taken at the time and, in 1979, a permanent conservation order was placed on all of the church property by the Heritage Council of New South Wales.[8]

Since that time the congregation have undertaken voluntary maintenance of the cemetery grounds. A listing of all of the headstones was made in 1985 and photographs have been taken of many of the headstones.”

OUR STAY IN ST PETERS:

Our daughter’s wedding took place in Sydney on Saturday, the 17th of February 2018. The wedding ceremony was for 2 in the afternoon.  We, that is our son Martin, Peter and I, booked into the Ibis Budget Hotel in St Peters for two nights on Friday already. The following day quite a few members of our family booked into the same hotel as well in order to attend the wedding on that Saturday.

https://www.accorhotels.com/gb/hotel-2699-ibis-budget-st-peters/index.shtml

Opposite our hotel was the old St Peters Cemetery. Peter and I went there for a walk. This old cemetery is kept in perfect condition. It was a pleasure to walk there among the old grave sites and read some of the stories about graves from the 19th century!

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