Archive | January, 2018

BIOGRAPHY about Michael Leunig

31 Jan

thumbnail_IMG_1668

Here is a very interesting biography about Leunig:

http://www.leunig.com.au/about/biography

 

 

 

Diary towards the End of January 2018

30 Jan

On Monday we had some goulash and dumplings left from Sunday. Peter liked the spicy gravy very much. He also got a little bit of left over red cabbage and some other vegies. I chose the following for my meal: Cannellini Beans ( Peter did get some of these too), Natural Yogurt,  and Beetroot.

DSCN3761

DSCN3752

To the beans I added some Psylium Husk Powder and grated cheese. I also added some Turmeric to the beans and there were also some salad leaves on the plate. We were both very happy with our meal!

DSCN3758

The other day at Bunnings in Warrawong we did get a spray can for painting the outside table a bright yellow. Peter also bought a new shower head. He already changed the shower head. And the new one works very well! Good job done Peter.

DSCN3747

We always buy a lot of different fruit. Every day we eat a bit of banana. The banana skin gets cut into small pieces for the worms in our worm farm.

DSCN3746

The apricots were delicious. Peter added one onto a piece of bread and thought it tasted as good as jam!

Up until last Sunday we watched a lot of tennis on TV. They showed quite a few very good matches from the Australian Open in Melbourne. The adds were very tiring though. It was usually  very hot during the AO. Here at our place we had a lot of hot days and nights the past few days. We even put the air-conditioning on a few times!

Just to be sure

30 Jan

Nina Caplan says: “My advice for a good marriage? Don’t start with a dream wedding”

30 Jan

 

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/dec/22/good-marriage-dream-wedding-inner-barbra-streisand-middle-aged-love

You can of course go to the above link of The Guardian and read the whole article but here is just a little bit of what NINA CAPLAN says on the subject of marriage:

” . . . .  Matrimony may make you wealthier, but the power isn’t vested in any institution to make you happier, or more secure in the psychological rather than the custodial sense. Only the right partnership can do that.

And – surprise, surprise – here is a study that tells us that this is exactly what the right partnership does. Data taken from more than 350,000 people in two UK surveys, analysed by researchers from the Vancouver School of Economics, informs us that married people are happier than single ones, that those in committed relationships, even without the paperwork, are as happy as those who have put a ring on it – and that the middle-aged are the most happily hitched of all.  . .

To find Meaning in Life

28 Jan

After browsing through a lot of articles on the internet, I ended up with the following blog about the Meaning in Life:

http://bigthink.com/21st-century-spirituality/4-ways-to-find-meaning-in-life

 

Derek Beres refers to  Emily Esfahani Smith’s  book, The Power of Meaning: Finding Fulfillment in a World Obsessed by Happiness, and says:

“We are obsessed with happiness, often believing it a birthright, yet as journalist We are obsessed with happiness, often believing it a birthright, yet as journalist Emily Esfahani Smith notes in her book, The Power of Meaning: Finding Fulfillment in a World Obsessed by Happiness, all that searching is actually making us unhappy”

Beres further says the following:

“As with my recent conversationwith Robert Lustig, Smith cites Aristotle’s concept of eudaemonia as a force for “cultivating the best qualities within you both morally and intellectually and living up to your potential.” Instead of chasing pleasure, we need to institute the search for meaning.

This is challenging during a time when you’re constantly instructed to do “what you love.” Smith counters this advice by invoking German philosopher Immanuel Kant. As with the mythologist Joseph Campbell, who, while famously remembered for saying “follow your bliss,” continued, “If your bliss is just your fun and your excitement, you’re on the wrong track.”

“To Kant, the question is not what makes you happy. The question is how to do your duty, how to best contribute—or, as the theologian Frederick Buechner put it, your vocation lies ‘where your deep gladness and the world’s deep hunger meet.’”

Smith’s beautifully researched homage to this hunger hinges on “four pillars of meaning.” By seeking, cultivating, and maintaining each of these, she argues, happiness arises from a deep sense of contentment rather than the incessant and unyielding grasping for pleasure. “

Then there are four interesting write-ups about

Belonging

Purpose

Storytelling

Transcendence: Here Beres points out that Smith grew up in a Sufi household.

Beres says: “Transcendence is at the heart of most spiritual traditions. It can be achieved through psychedelics, music, scripture, or meditation. A deep sense of connectedness carries adherents beyond the normal trappings of society. People are able to intimately connect with their environment and peers. Writing of volunteers in a 2015 study focused on the development of empathy through transcendence,”

Smith notes:

“They abandoned the conceit, which many of us have, that they were the center of the world. Instead, they stepped outside of themselves to connect with and focus on others.”

 

 Derek Beres is the author ofWhole Motion: Training Your Brain and Body For Optimal Health. Based in Los Angeles, he is working on a new book about spiritual consumerism. Stay in touch on Facebook and Twitter.

 

Here is what I found in Amazon.com about the book:

https://www.amazon.com/Power-Meaning-Fulfillment-Obsessed-Happiness/

The Power of Meaning: Finding Fulfillment in a World Obsessed with Happiness Paperback – September 5, 2017
by Emily Esfahani Smith (Author)
In a culture obsessed with happiness, this wise, stirring book points the way toward a richer, more satisfying life.

“Too many of us believe that the search for meaning is an esoteric pursuit—that you have to travel to a distant monastery or page through dusty volumes to discover life’s secrets. The truth is, there are untapped sources of meaning all around us—right here, right now.

To explore how we can craft lives of meaning, Emily Esfahani Smith synthesizes a kaleidoscopic array of sources—from psychologists, sociologists, philosophers, and neuroscientists to figures in literature and history such as George Eliot, Viktor Frankl, Aristotle, and the Buddha. Drawing on this research, Smith shows us how cultivating connections to others, identifying and working toward a purpose, telling stories about our place in the world, and seeking out mystery can immeasurably deepen our lives.

To bring what she calls the four pillars of meaning to life, Smith visits a tight-knit fishing village in the Chesapeake Bay, stargazes in West Texas, attends a dinner where young people gather to share their experiences of profound loss, and more. She also introduces us to compelling seekers of meaning—from the drug kingpin who finds his purpose in helping people get fit to the artist who draws on her Hindu upbringing to create arresting photographs. And she explores how we might begin to build a culture that leaves space for introspection and awe, cultivates a sense of community, and imbues our lives with meaning.

Inspiring and story-driven, The Power of Meaning will strike a profound chord in anyone seeking a life that matters.”

“Nobody inherits emails and tweets!”

27 Jan

Nobody inherits emails and tweets!”

This is what Wally says in Di Morrissey’s novel that I talked about yesterday in my blog:

https://auntyuta.com/2018/01/26/the-red-coast/

So, I think Wally raised the point that what is written down as a family history, can be passed on to future generations.

Wally says there is a chance that someone might find the written down family history sometime in the future and become interested in it. But something like this is not going to happen with emails or tweets. And I think this statement is correct!

This statement makes me feel good since for the past few years I tried over and over again to write down as much about my family history as I could remember. According to Wally I seem to have done the right thing writing down whatever I could. There is just one thing, I am still far behind in copying everything onto paper. To my mind it is much safer to leave everything on paper besides having it in the computer. So far having my writing in the computer seems to be more or less safe. However, I am not so sure that safety is guaranteed for all eternity! It should really be one of my priorities to copy my writing onto paper. Why do I find it so hard to persevere with this? Many distractions. perhaps? The distractions seem to be never ending. I make excuses every day why I cannot do certain things. With advancing age there are days when I find it difficult, to continue reading interesting articles in the media or in WordPress. This dreadful lethargy makes me just play games on the computer. At least, usually I am still capable of getting good results when I play these games. I stick to three different games only. I am not interested in finding any more games to play on the computer. These three games, that I keep playing, I find to be enough entertainment. I do not want to get bogged down with any more games!

My three games on the computer are:

  • Free Cell
  • Spider Solitaire
  • Solitaire

Today, after a break of two weeks, we finally managed to do some house cleaning again. I was happy to be able to share in the task, and I was also very happy when after a couple of hours or so I had the feeling that now the house was reasonably clean again.

The next thing on the list was travelling to Warrawong for a bit of shopping. Peter was not very happy when I suggested a tea-break. Bunnings, the huge hardware store, where we managed to get a few things that we had been looking for, well, this hardware store was not air-conditioned. It was very hot and humid outside. The hot humid air was allowed to fill the store through the open doors. I think a few fans were blowing in the shop. It was not disastrously hot, but the humid air made it extremely uncomfortable. I usually do not like a lot of air-conditioning, but when the hot air is so very humid, then I am really grateful for a bit of air-conditioning. Our next stop was the huge Warrawong Shopping Centre, and this place was cool.

This is when I suggested our tea-break. It took a while to talk Peter into it. When Peter goes shopping by himself he never stops for tea or coffee. And very reluctantly he agreed to have this tea-break with me.

 

Today was the day after Australia Day. The coffee/tea shop in the shopping centre still had some Australian flags on display.

One week ago, on Saturday, we had our lunch meeting with the future in-laws. The wedding of Caroline and Matthew is going to take place in three weeks time, namely on the 17th of February 2018. This is the day when twelve years ago Caroline and Matthew met for the first time!

 

DSCN3735

 

THE RED COAST

26 Jan

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/35724024-the-red-coast

“THE RED COAST” is the title of a novel by DI MORRISSEY. I am now about half way through reading this book. Last night = just before going to sleep – I got stuck on pages 184/185. DI MORRISSEY tells the reader about a writers’ festival in Broome where some well known authors are present. During question time Wally, a 90+ old man from the audience asks one of the authors:

“So, tell me, how would you suggest getting a book together from a whole pile of notes and letters?”

“Are they yours? Or someone else’s? You mean like compiling a family history?” replied the young author.

Wally points out that it is not just a family history but “a ripping yarn, an adventure and a mystery” which is all true and “would be a bloody good movie. But sad though.”

The author’s advice is as follows:  “Start at the beginning. Pretend you are writing a letter to a friend.” And then he asks Wally: “Can you use a computer?”

Here is Wally’s answer: “Bloody oath, I’m on Facebook. –  Well, computers might be all the go these days, but I reckon we should all be writing down our family stories. And even if they don’t get published, someone will find and read them. Nobody inherits emails and tweets. My wife’s family history is an oral one, so unless the stories are told to the next generation, the history will be lost. You got to keep your family’s stories.”

So DI MORRISSEY  writes: “There was a burst of applause when he said this, and Wally sat back down looking pleased with himself.”

Recently I’ve been reading a lot of novels about outback Australia, wriiten by Australian authors. I find it always very interesting to learn a bit more about outback Australia. What this over ninety year old bloke says in DI Morrissey’s novel I find most interesting. For instance he says, that nobody inherits emails and tweets. This is pretty sharp, wouldn’t you think so?

https://diverstavern.com.au/event/corrugation-lines-broome-writers-festival/

Grassroot Records and Divers Tavern present a special Corrugation Lines, Broome writer’s Festival opening event. Shane Howard in Concert. The Tavern will be transformed into a seated theatre for this rare chance to see one of Australia’s treasured artists in an intimate concert. Marking 20 years since he produced the widely loved Pigram Brothers album “Saltwater Country”, Broome welcomes back the writer and poet in all his heartfelt storytelling magic. Do not miss!

The above was a Broome Writers’ Festival Event in August 2017.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shane_Howard