Archive | November, 2015

Childhood Memories about Advent

29 Nov

At this time of the year memories keep coming back about how we celebrated the Advents Sundays during the late 1930s and early 1940s. During those years we always had an ‘Adventskranz’ with four, thick, usually red, candles. On each Advent Sunday one more candle would be lighted. The ‘Kranz’ was made up of fresh fir-tree branches. When we sat down with one, two, three or four candles lit, my little brother and I would be allowed to do some ‘kokeln’, but of course always under supervision by Mum. ‘Kokeln’ would mean that Mum gave us a beautiful fresh twig of the fir-tree branches to hold over a burning candle. This made a fantastic smell. Oh, how we loved this smell. I could tell, Mum loved it too. This quickly brought us into the mood to sing some Christmas songs.

https://auntyuta.com/2014/12/03/christmas-songs-and-some-german-christmas-customs/

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It is still early Sunday morning. We have had our breakfast with some fresh bread-rolls. We lit one candle on our artificial ‘Adventskranz’. The dishes are done now. I look out through the kitchen window and can still see some of the flowers. They usually last only for a day or two. But some more new ones may come up soon.

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First Sunday of Advent

28 Nov

 

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This is the first Sunday of Advent. A couple of days ago was Mark’s 54th birthday. In 2011 Mark’s 50th birthday was being celebrated.

https://auntyuta.com/2011/12/03/party-pictures-from-nov-26th/

https://auntyuta.com/2011/11/29/50th-and-55th/

Next Sunday, on the 6th of December. we are going to meet the family again to celebrate some more birthdays.

NATURAL SOURDOUGH

27 Nov

The other day at Merrylands we bought this NATURAL SOURDOUGH bread. I just have been eating a few more slices of it. This bread tastes very yummy! It is called ‘Roggenmischbrot’. It is a product of Australia and has a ‘true European taste’!  There were 650g of it for five Dollars. I think, it is very good value.

Last Saturday we went to the Griffin Theatre in Sydney. We went to a Japanese Restaurant before the theatre. Caroline and Matthew were with us. I had a vegetarian dish, which was very good. I liked it a lot.

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On Friday the 13th our group of women went out for lunch together. This had been quite a hot day too. After lunch we were at Erika’s place for our game of Scrabble, for coffee and cake and later on we played Rummy as we always do on a Friday afternoon. Today is Friday again, and I just came home from our games afternoon at Irene’s place.

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This picture is also from Friday the 13th of November 2015.

This picture is also from Friday the 13th of November 2015.

 

 

Some more photos of Stockland Shopping Centre in Merrylands

27 Nov

Yes, Merrylands Shopping Centre is now a lot larger than it used to be. Gaby did experience the second stage of the opening, but she died before the third and last stage was ready for opening. After we had our lunch and some coffee in Merrylands last Wednesday we spent a bit of time to walk through the new section of the Shopping Centre. (I think the outside temperature was close to 40C on that day!) As we were walking along all the new little shops, Peter was looking out for a shop where he might find some delicious continental bread. And he was lucky: He was able to buy a ‘Roggen-Mischbrot’. It was sliced,  cost only five Dollars and was quite fresh.

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Towards the End of November 2015

27 Nov

Last Wednesday we went to Merrylands.

25th Nov.2015 in Merrylands

25th Nov.2015 in Merrylands

 

 

It was a very hot day. We had lunch in Stockland Merrylands and a cup of coffee later on.

We found a seat in the shade in the open air cafe.

We found a seat in the shade in the open air cafe.

View from the terrace at Stockland Merrylands where we had lunch.

View from the terrace at Stockland Merrylands where we had lunch.

Many things had changed since we last had been in Merrylands with Gaby. But we noticed that the Heart to Heart Cafe was still there.

Next to the upstairs eating hall we found this mosaic.

Next to the upstairs eating hall we found this mosaic.

 

 

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We found a picture of Gaby in this huge mosaic.

We found a picture of Gaby in this huge mosaic.

This is a picture of Gaby's dog.

This is a picture of Gaby’s dog.

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Three Documentaries about the lost World of Communism

23 Nov

Documentary – The lost world of communism part 1 (East Germany)
Thomas Young

Documentary – The lost world of communism part 2 (Czechoslovakia)
Thomas Young

Documentary – The lost world of communism part 3 (Romania)
Thomas Young

Notmsparker inspired me to want to watch all three documentaries about the Lost World of Communism.
I already watched the first documentary. A lot of things in the GDR (German Democratic Republic) I would not have liked.
Maybe for a young child, if you had parents who could lead a comparatively ‘normal’ life, it was not such a bad place to live. Most adults and older children were always in danger of being prosecuted. This is the way I see it. During the 1980s this so called workers’ paradise took some really bad turns. This documentary about the GDR shows quite a few things how more and more people got disillusioned about their so called ‘paradise’ even though to some extend ‘normal’ life did go on.

THE LOST WORLDS

23 Nov

NotMs Parker writes how “it is quite painful to be confronted with often negative and disparaging comments about what life in Eastern Europe before 1989 must have been like.”
There is a great BBC film included about life in East Germany which provoked NotMsParker’s post.

 

KREUZBERGED: BERLIN COMPANION

A little Communist, Notmsparker, in Poland in April of  1980. A little Communist, Notmsparker, in Poland in April of 1980.

What happened in Europe in the late 1980s – the fall of the Berlin Wall, the end of communism in Poland, perestroika in the former Soviet Union as well as the collapse of a whole social and political system east of the Iron Curtain – had immense consequences not only of political and economic but also of very personal nature.

Suddenly your world was no longer there. All of a sudden, none of the rules you lived by or traditions you followed mattered. It was by all means a good and welcome change but also one which, as always, came at a price.

For those born in those lost countries, even today, it is quite painful to be confronted with often negative and disparaging comments about what life in Eastern Europe before 1989 must have been like. “Grey” is the…

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