Uta’s Diary, June 2019

Here is something I published one year ago on the 6th of June:

Hurrah! My new glasses are here!!

DSCN4344DSCN4347DSCN4346This is printed on one of the cleaning cloths.
The green rimmed glasses are for using at the computer, the red rimmed ones are for walking around in, and the dark glasses are anti glare and good for wearing in the car.

I also still have some reading glasses!!

Here is what you can find in Google about The Fred Hollows Foundation:

https://www.hollows.org/au/about-the-foundation

So, I added that I still have some reading glasses as well. I could not read any books if I did not have my reading glasses. These too are very important to me. With all the different glasses in their different cases I get by beautifully. I think, all the different glasses still work more or less as well as they did last year.

Anyhow, the other day I did get a reminder from Specsavers that another eye-test is due. So I thought, I better get my eyes checked again. I made an appointment for Tuesday, the 25th of June.

It turned out that the night from Monday to Tuesday was a very bad night for Peter and me. Peter happened to feel extremely dizzy. He felt so horrible that I called the ambulance. The ambulance people checked him out: Blood pressure and pulse were all right. So there was nothing wrong with his heart. They determined that it was just very bad vertigo. Since Peter had been vomiting a bit, they gave him an injection to stop the vomiting. They offered they could take him to the hospital, but there was probably nothing they could do about the vertigo. They said it was up to Peter to decide whether he wanted to go to the hospital or not. When Peter decided to stay at home, they advised, to call them back if later on for breakfast he did not feel all right.

Both Peter and I were able to go back to sleep for a few hours after the ambulance people left. And breakfast turned out to be pretty normal! So, this was good. Also, Peter was then able to drive me to the shopping centre for my appointment at Specsavers.

The eye-test result was pretty good, my eye-sight deteriorated only very little. I asked, whether it was all right, to have my cataract operation instead of in July, some five or six months later. The examining lady answered that this should be all right.

So I had been on the waiting list for the cataract operation since August last year. And I was advised recently that I could have it now in July. I found out that it was possible to delay the operation for another six months. Only if I did not have it by the end of six months I would loose my spot on the waiting list and had to go back to the end of the list!

So, I am happy now, that I can wait for this operation for a little bit longer. I mean, so far my eye-sight is not too bad. I do not fear the operation as such, I only fear that if my good eye gets operated on and something goes wrong, I might end up being totally blind, for my other eye is totally blind because of macular hole. . . .

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macular_hole

 

High Speed Rail?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sydney%E2%80%93Melbourne_rail_corridor

The following I found in Wikipedia. So, to this day ‘High Speed Rail’ does not exist yet in Australia!

High-speed rail[edit]

Based on the definition of a minimum top speed of 200 km/h in passenger service, High-speed rail in Australia does not yet exist, but there are proposals for high-speed rail (HSR) infrastructure in Australia (also known as very fast train projects) – several proposals have been investigated since the early 1980s.[7]

Various combinations of the route between MelbourneCanberraGoulburnSydneyNewcastleCoffs HarbourGold Coastand Brisbane have been the subject of detailed investigation by prospective operators, government departments and advocacy groups.

Phase 1 of the A$20m HSR study was released on 4 August 2011.[8] It proposed a corridor similar to the 2001 study, with prospective stations located in Melbourne, Tullamarine, Albury, Canberra, Goulburn, Sydney, Newcastle, the Mid—North Coast, Gold Coast and Brisbane. The cost for this route was estimated at A$61 billion, but the adoption of more difficult alignments or cost blowouts could raise the cost to over A$100 billion.[8] The report urged the authorities to acquire land on the corridor now to avoid further price escalations.[8]

Work on phase 2 of the study started in late 2011 and culminated in the release of the High speed rail study phase 2 report[9]on 11 April 2013. Building on the work of phase 1, it was more comprehensive in objectives and scope, and refined many of the phase 1 estimates, particularly demand and cost estimates.

Other proposals[edit]

Less ambitious proposals have included a minor 9.2-kilometre (5.7 mi) Jindalee Deviation mentioned in a 2006 Ernst and Young Report. Naturally a slow evolution consisting of many short deviations which can provide benefits sooner will not be equivalent to a few large deviations which could provide bigger bypasses and greater benefit. However more ambitious proposals come with greater risk of projects being delayed or cancelled.

Over the years a number of deviations have been proposed for the track between Junee and Sydney, including between Glenlee and Aylmerton (known as the Wentworth Deviation), Werai and Penrose, Goulburn and Yass (Centennial Deviation), Bowning and Frampton including a bypass of Cootamundra (Hoare Deviation), and Frampton and Bethungra (removal of the Bethungra Spiral).[10] The proposals would replace 260 kilometres (160 mi) of winding track with 200 kilometres (120 mi) of straighter, higher-speed track, saving travel time, fuel, brake wear and track maintenance. However the Australian Rail Track Corporation have only documented plans for a handful of minor deviations to be completed by 2014.[11]

Fifteen Months ago

Fifteen Months ago? Was it only fifteen months ago when I published the following? Indeed, I found that I published the following on the 18th of March 2018.

I did write, that we left Benalla on Monday on the night train from Melbourne, arriving Tuesday morning back home (that would probably have been around 7am.)  At 9 am on that day we left again for my doctor’s appointment in Wollongong, going to Wollongong by bus. We both felt rather tired after having spent a night sitting up on the train!

I remember very well how awfully tired we both felt on that morning after having been sitting up on the night train . The Melbourne night train would have arrived in Benalla some time after 11pm. At around 5am we would have had to get off the train to go on the railway bus that goes down MacQuarie Pass towards Albion Park, Dapto, Wollongong. So this bus is a good connection to Dapto where we live. Only on that morning we had to leave again soon after we had arrived home. This was really terrible. We said then, we would not go on the night train again: The next time we would be catching the day train! Very conveniently there is also a day train from Melbourne that stops in Benalla at a convenient time, and then the railway bus takes us, not too late in the evening, from Moss Vale to Dapto!

“The XPT service runs two return trips each day between Melbourne and Sydney, making scheduledstops at Broadmeadows, Seymour, Benalla, Wangaratta, Albury, Wagga Wagga, Junee, Cootamundra, Yass Junction, Goulburn, Moss Vale, Campbelltown and Strathfield with optional stops at Culcairn, Henty, The Rock, Harden and …”

https://www.rome2rio.com/trip/pnwrvcyo

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sydney%E2%80%93Melbourne_rail_corridor

So here now is the copy of my post from the 18th March, 2018:

“How to keep Track of Time? Yes, how do you do this? Eighty + years of impressions, incidents and experiences, having seen so many different places, having met so many different people. Does it all become a blur in the end?

For young people time often seems to drag on slowly, slowly. But ask any elderly person, the answer is, that time passes awfully quickly. What is a week? A week, well, a week just flies away. I try to recall what we did last week, two weeks ago, three weeks ago, four weeks ago. Four weeks ago? Is it four weeks ago that we stayed in Sydney for a few days for our daughter’s  wedding? Is it two weeks ago that we travelled to Benalla to stay there for a week with our son? What about doctor’s appointments? Did we have three different doctor’s appointments during the past week? Quite so. That is, I met another specialist for the first time last week, and Peter also met another specialist for the first time last week.  Peter also saw his GP, the one that he has been seeing for many years. He was the first one who explained to Peter that according to some test results a ‘tumor’ ought  to be investigated. Some 18 months later he looked at some other test results and concluded that there were some problems with his heart. And so it goes.

On one of Benalla’s Walking Tracks with son Martin

We left Benalla on Monday on the night train from Melbourne, arriving Tuesday morning back home. At 9 am on that day we left again for my doctor’s appointment in Wollongong, going to Wollongong by bus. We both felt rather tired after having spent a night sitting up on the train!

Anyway, the following day, Wednesday, Peter saw his GP who is now in Corrimal (not in Dapto anymore). I went along with Peter. The visit at the Corrimal Medical Centre was over quickly. So well before lunchtime Peter drove us to the Leisure Coast fruit shop in Fairy Meadow where we did some serious shopping.

Thursday would have been the day for my slow movement exercises here in Dapto. But I felt awfully tired and gave it a miss. I felt that it was really good for me not to have to do anything on that day! Peter however felt on that day well enough  to locally do a bit of shopping  to get the ingredients for a quark cheesecake. And in the afternoon he actually did bake this cake while I was resting in the bedroom. – This cake baking seems to have been a kind of relaxation for  him.

Friday morning Peter found the time to go through the whole house with the vacuum cleaner. Then he went off to Wollongong to see the surgeon who may do a heart bypass operation on him. It turned out,  before he is about to do this, Peter should go for some more scan tests!

I stayed home on Friday. After having done some wiping of the floors, I did get some lunch ready and I  also made preparations for my afternoon visitors. It was my turn to have the four ladies over for our Friday afternoon games of Scrabble and Rummy. Also on Friday, our daughter Monika dropped in at 5,30 after work. Talking to our daughter about a lot of things was a good finish of the day.

And yesterday, Saturday, was a very good day too: Our daughter Caroline and son-in-law Matthew came to visit!

Is it only two more weeks to Easter Sunday? So it is, and I am looking forward to some family visits at Easter time!”

A 1%er Looks at Inequality

Chuck Collins is a great example what actually is doable!

The Most Revolutionary Act

This is a presentation Oscar Mayer heir Chuck Collins, author of Born on Third Base, gave on November 9th. At age 26, Collins made the brave decision to give his fortune away. He currently works as a senior scholar at the Institute for Policy Studies in Washington DC. In his leisure time, he works to educate 1%ers about inequality and their ethical obligations to society. He has campaigned heavily with Bill Gates senior and other billionaires to retain the estate tax and to oppose tax cuts for the wealthy.

Most of the presentation concerns his efforts to challenge the views of other 1%ers on privilege and the grave threat inequality poses to American democracy and the planet.

The Q&As, in which he talks about Donald Trump’s election upset are the best part of the talk. Collins credits Trump’s victory to the dismissive way Democrats view and talk about the…

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Some more Pictures from our Weekend at Sussex Inlet in June 2019

 

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The above pictures I took early on Saturday morning on the 1st of June 2019.

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On that weekend at Sussex Inlet, Peter and I as well as our daughter Monika remembered our arrival in Australia 60 years ago, that is we arrived at Port Melbourne on the 31st of May 1959 when Monika was barely 6 months old!

Monika’s partner, her two sons and three daughters (one daughter pregnant with her second child!) and also their partners and Monika’s 3 grandchildren and our 59 year old son Martin (Monika’s brother)  were all cebrating with us. Still, there were a few other family members that could not come to Sussex Inlet on that weekend. But some we had been seeing earlier on in May. On the last weekend of June, that is this month, we are going to be in Newcastle to celebrate the 21st birthday of Martin’s younger daughter Lauren.

This is what I wrote in May after we had had quite a few visitors on Mothers Day:

“We had quite a few visitors yesterday for Mothers Day. Come to think of it, all the mothers that were visiting, were already grandmothers. And I am even a great-grandmother! I was so happy, that great-grandons Lucas and Alexander were visiting too yesterday! And Peter actually did hand out roses yesterday to all the visiting mothers. I think they liked this very much.

So, for about three hours in the afternoon we had a large crowd in our house. Daughters Monika and Caroline did most of the catering. This was very relaxing for me.

Monika had come with her daughter Natasha and her son Troy had come with his fiancee Antonina. Troy’s twin-brother Ryan and wife Ebony spent the afternoon with Ebony’s family, but Troy and Nina had brought their nephews Lucas and Alexander along to our plae. Caroline’s husband Matthew and Monika’s partner Mark had come too, and Mark had brought his mother Merl along.”

As far as the 1st of June is concerned, I reflected that on the 1st of June 1959 we had already settled into our accommodation at Bonegilla, Victoria. I wrote about it here:

https://auntyuta.com/2019/06/17/how-we-settled-in-australia/