Archive | Uncategorized RSS feed for this section

My Friends in 1947/48

16 Apr

I just discovered what I wrote five years ago and found it interesting reading, especially all the comments to it! Last night I started reading a story about an eleven year old girl who is unhappy for she has no”best” friend. I am curious, how this story is going to develop. Maybe I too should write a story about the longing for a “best” friend. I am quite familiar with such a feeling.

auntyuta

At age thirteen my best friends were Cordula and Lieselotte. The three of us started our own little club. We met several times a week. None of us had a boy-friend. However we talked about what it would be like to experience romance.  Just talking about it was very exciting!

One afternoon the three of us had our picture taken at a photographer’s. I still have this picture. Looking at this picture brings back memories how much at ease I felt then. Yet this Threesome lasted for a short time only. Cordula had already lost her dad. All of a sudden her mum died too. How upsetting for her! She moved away to live with her aunts in West-Germany. The departure happened so quickly that there wasn’t time to say good-buy. I felt shocked about it. Yet I sensed that there had been a need for the sudden departure.

The…

View original post 217 more words

The Playground in Lakelands Park

30 Mar

DSCN4049

Krystal’s birthday coming up on the 5th of April. She turns 21 this year!!

I just looked up what I wrote four years ago on Krystal’s birthday. Here it is:

https://auntyuta.com/2014/04/05/krystals-birthday-today/

It features some pictures what the playground in Lakelands Park looked in 2001.

Krystal has been sliding down and Roxy stand beside her.

Krystal has been sliding down and Roxy stands beside her.

img185

And while I am at it, I copy here what the  bush in front of our house looked like in 2000 and I am going to show what it looks like now 17 years later:

This is just a bit of the front of our house in the year 2OOO. I put this photo in to show how small this tree in front of our window was at the time. It looks very huge now and the gardener trims is every so often otherwise there would not be left enough room for the parking spot at the left of the house.

This is just a bit of the front of our house in the year 2000. I put this photo in to show how small this tree in front of our window was at the time. It looks very huge now, and the gardener trims it every so often, otherwise there would not be left enough room for one of the parking spots at the left of the house.

 

DSCN4071

This bush looks so much bigger now, and all the trees behind have grown enormously!

And now back to the playground, what it looks like at present at Eastertime 2018:

DSCN4051

DSCN4057

DSCN4063

 

DSCN4044

Today is Good Friday, the 30th of March 2018. I went for an early walk to the playground in Lakelands Park.

When I arrived back home, I took some Easter pictures:

DSCN4073

DSCN4074

DSCN4076

Some Peter Rabbit Books for the Kids

DSCN4077

This is another picture from Lakelands Park in 2001. Ilse, Peter’s sister, was here in Dapto on a visit from Berlin. She is in the picture on the right. Our daughter Monika in the middle with her three daughters: Roxy, Krystal and Natasha on the left. I am between Natasha and Krystal.

 

Monday 26 March, 2018 A Night with Michael Sandel on Q & A

27 Mar

http://www.abc.net.au/tv/qanda/txt/s4808926.htm#

Michael Sandel

Michael Sandel teaches political philosophy at Harvard University. He has been described as “the most relevant living philosopher,” a “rock-star moralist,”(Newsweek) and “currently the most popular professor in the world.”(Die Zeit)

His writings—on justice, ethics, democracy, and markets–have been translated into 27 languages. His legendary course “Justice” is the first Harvard course to be made freely available online and on television. It has been viewed by tens of millions of people around the world, including in China, where Michael was named the “most influential foreign figure of the year.” (China Newsweek)

Michael’s books relate the big questions of political philosophy to the most vexing issues of our time. They include What Money Can’t Buy: The Moral Limits of Markets; Justice: What’s the Right Thing to Do?; The Case against Perfection: Ethics in the Age of Genetic Engineering; and Democracy’s Discontent: America in Search of a Public Philosophy.

His BBC series “The Public Philosopher” explores the philosophical ideas lying behind the headlines with audiences around the world, including a discussion of violence against women, recorded in India, and a debate about democracy in Britain’s Parliament. In Brazil, he recently led a debate on corruption and the ethics of everyday life that reached an audience of 19 million on Globo TV. On NHK, Japan’s national television network, he led a discussion with students from China, Japan, and South Korea on history and moral responsibility.

Michael has been a pioneer in the use of new technology to promote global public discourse. In a new BBC series, “The Global Philosopher” Michael leads video-linked discussions with participants from over 30 countries on issues such as immigration and climate change.

Michael has been a visiting professor at the Sorbonne, delivered the Tanner Lectures on Human Values at Oxford, and given the Kellogg Lecture on Jurisprudence at the U.S. Library of Congress. A member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, he received his doctorate from Oxford University, where he was a Rhodes Scholar.

Michael’s lecture tours have taken him across five continents and packed such venues as St. Paul’s Cathedral (London), the Sydney Opera House (Australia), and an outdoor stadium in Seoul (S. Korea), where 14,000 people came to hear him speak.

Published on Sep 28, 2017

SUBSCRIBE 54K
“The rise of right wing populism represents the failure of liberal and progressive politics,” says Harvard political philosopher Michael Sandel. He joins The Agenda to diagnose the failure of liberal politics, the decline of civic life, and what liberals need to know in the age of anger and populism.

 

Fluorides, the atomic bomb, and fake news

21 Mar

Stuart Bramhall says:

“Reblogged this on The Most Revolutionary Act and commented:
Much of the original “proof” that fluoride is safe for humans in low doses was generated by A-bomb program scientists, who were secretly ordered to provide ‘evidence useful in litigation’ [by persons who had been poisoned by fluoride and would sue for damages]. The first lawsuits against the US A-bomb program were not over radiation, but over fluoride damage.”
I am going to reblog this too!

Jon Rappoport's Blog

Fluorides, the atomic bomb, and fake news

Faced with toxic fluorides destroying food crops, animal and human life, and with law suits piling up, atomic scientists decided they could distract the nation by promoting fluorides as a beneficial tooth treatment…

by Jon Rappoport

February 1, 2018

Occasionally, I reprint this article. I wrote it some years ago, during research on toxic chemicals pervading the landscape. I used to send the piece to mainstream reporters, but I eventually gave that up as a bad bet.

They’re dedicated to fake news…and now they’re losing control over public consciousness. Losing badly. Independent media are in the ascendance, and rightly so.

In 1997, Joel Griffiths and Chris Bryson, two respected mainstream journalists, peered into an abyss. They found a story about fluorides that was so chilling it had to be told.

The Christian Science Monitor, who had assigned the story, never published it.

Their…

View original post 1,142 more words

KETOSIS

21 Mar

https://www.google.com.au/search?q=ketosis&rlz=1C1GGRV_enAU751AU751&oq=ketosis&aqs=chrome..69i57j0l5.6252j0j8&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

Ketosis: What is ketosis?

I LOOKED THIS UP HERE:

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/180858.php

It says:

“In normal circumstances, the body’s cells use glucose as their primary form of energy. Glucose is typically derived from dietary carbohydrates, including:

  • sugar – such as fruits and milk or yogurt
  • starchy foods – such as bread and pasta

The body breaks these down into simple sugars. Glucose can either be used to fuel the body or be stored in the liver and muscles as glycogen.

If there is not enough glucose available to meet energy demands, the body will adopt an alternative strategy in order to meet those needs. Specifically, the body begins to break down fat stores to provide glucose from triglycerides.

Ketones are a by-product of this process.

Ketones are acids that build up in the blood and are eliminated in urine. In small amounts, they serve to indicate that the body is breaking down fat, but high levels of ketones can poison the body, leading to a process called ketoacidosis.

Ketosis describes the metabolic state whereby the body converts fat stores into energy, releasing ketones in the process.”

 

 

 

Researcher Discovers a New Non-toxic Approach to Cancer Management

16 Mar

Dr. Bramhall commented: The ketogenic diet as a potential non-toxic cancer treatment.

peoples trust toronto

http://ift.tt/2FJHmpM

Anna Hunt, Staff Writer
Waking Times

Dr. Dominic D’Agostino did not set out to find a treatment for cancer. Yet, during his research into the treatment of seizures, he found a possible non-toxic alternative approach to cancer management. D’Agostino discovered that eliminating carbohydrates from the diet could starve cancer cells.

An Unexpected Discovery

Dr. D’Agostino is an Assistant Professor at the University of South Florida College of Medicine, Molecular Pharmacology & Physiology. He was commissioned by the Navy Seals to help solve the problem of unexpected seizures that occur in a high-oxygen and high-pressure environment (ie. such as deep-sea diving).

His research led D’Agostino to compare the brain to a hybrid engine. It typically uses glucose as its primary source of energy. When glucose is limited, it can use ketones as an alternative fuel source. This why the ketogenic diet is effective in treating seizures in individuals suffering…

View original post 508 more words

Brief Stop at Benalla, Victoria

8 Mar

I wrote this about our brief stop in Benalla in Diary January 2017

auntyuta

Uta’s Diary, January 2017

After we left Melbourne, Benalla was our first stop. We were on the way to a farmstead near Wangaratta to visit our grandson Tristan and his family.

Peter took the following six pictures during a brief stop at Benalla, Victoria.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA We were lucky, nothing bad happened to us. We just enjoyed the beautiful sight of it.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

From Wikipedia:
“Weary Dunlop Memorial Located within the Botanical Gardens and clearly visible from Bridge Street is the Weary Dunlop Memorial, a powerful statue depicting two Australian doctors (Dunlop being the standing one) helping a wounded and emaciated comrade. Cast in bronze and over 2 metres high it stands on a granite plinth with the words “compassion, integrity, forgiveness, humility, courage, leadership, friendship” engraved on the granite base. It was created by sculptor Louis Lauman to dramatically depict Dunlop’s work helping wounded and dying POWs. The sculpture was unveiled in…

View original post 61 more words