I copied what I wrote in October 2013 about Bushfires near Sydney

Sunday, October 20th, 2013

“Premier Barry O’Farrell has today been at the Rural Fire Service Headquarters in Lidcombe.

He has warned residents across the state to brace for the possibility of mass evacuations in coming days amid dire weather forecasts.”

‘‘The state’s in for challenging days ahead,’’ he said

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/nsw-bushfires-live-updates-20131020-2vumk.html#ixzz2iEI9AfvF

I just discovered the above new item in the Sydney Morning Herald.

Some areas in NSW experienced the worst bushfires last Thursday when temperatures reached the high thirties (Celsius) with very strong erratic extremely hot winds. 208 houses have been destroyed so far. The entire Blue Mountains Area is still in danger.

So the Premier says ” to brace for the possibility of mass evacuations in coming days amid dire weather forecasts.”

This warning applies to residents across the state of NSW. I think a lot of people tend to think it is not going to effect them unless they live right next to the bush. However to be honest under these dire weather conditions a fire could turn up anywhere within a very short time. So I think the Premier is right to give people a warning like this.  For sure it is much better to be prepared than to be sorry later on.

 

Here now is a message from the Queen:

 

“2:58pm: Her Majesty The Queen has just sent a message on the bushfire situation here. She’s expressed great admiration for the work of fire fighters.

“I would like to convey my heartfelt sympathy to all those who have been affected by the devastating bushfires across New South Wales.

“My thoughts are with the many people who have lost their homes or livelihoods in the fires, and I have great admiration for the fire fighters, volunteers and emergency services officers who are working tirelessly to contain the situation.”

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/nsw-bushfires-live-updates-20131020-2vumk.html#ixzz2iEQUOraR

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14 thoughts on “Bushfire Warnings for the Coming Days”

  1. Liebe Ute wünsche dir einen schönen Tag und ich wünsche dir das du vor dem Feuer in Sicherheit bist,ist eine schreckliche Sache, die armen Leute tun mir so Leid ich bette für sie.Ich wünsche dir eine gute Woche und alles Liebe von mir.Lieber Gruß von mir und Freundschaft.Gislinde

    1. Thanks for your concern, Mary-Ann. We are near Wollongong 100 km south of Sydney. We are all right for the time being. The huge fires in the Blue Mountains a bit west of Sydney are still of great concern.

  2. This is a good round-up for me thank you, Aunty Uta, of what’s happening. I see snippets of the news, but only grabs of it. Glad you provided the link.
    I don’t think I’d ever build in a forest.

    Hope youa re well, Aunty Uta! 🙂

    1. Yes. thank you, Noeleen, Peter and I are well. Of course people who build in bush areas, are most at risk. But this does not mean if you build in a suburb or city there is no risk. It is very difficult to keep bushfires under control if there is no moisture in the air and if there are very hot, strong winds. At the moment more than 2000 firefighters try to keep the fires under control!
      All of Sydney is covered in smog from the fires in the Blue Mountains.
      Today we might get a bit of rain, but it won’t be enough rain to extinguish the huge fires to the west of Sydney. These fires might rage on for weeks to come.
      Where we are there are a lot of trees and grass and everything dries out quickly in hot, windy weather. As the Premier says, we prepare for the worst but hope for the best!
      Cheers, Aunty Uta. 🙂

      1. I hope for the best alongside you, Aunty Uta.

        It’s raining in Melbourne right now.

        Every year the same and every year still so much tragedy in it – losing your belongings, photos, “things”. Left with nil. It’s really distresing, Aunty Uta. I’d hate to see that smoke in the hills.

        Take care 🙂

    1. Sheila, these bushfires in the mountains are terrifying. The really hot weather did not last for very long. Now with much cooler weather I guess the firefighting gets a little bit easier. There are still some rather unpredictable winds around, that means the firefighters and emergency workers still have a very tough job.
      Thank you! Cheerio, Uta ox

Bob Dylan / Keith Richards / Ron Wood – Blowin’ In The Wind (Live Aid 1985)

Bob Dylan, Keith Richards and Ron Wood performing at Live Aid in front of 100,000 people in the John F. Kennedy Stadium, Philadelphia USA on the 13th July, 1985. The event was organised by Sir Bob Geldof and Midge Ure to raise funds for the Ethiopian famine disaster. Broadcast across the world via one of the largest satellite link-ups of all time, the concerts were seen by around 40% of the global population.

My Back Pages” Bob Dylan / the best version you’ve ever heard.

1,274,108 views
Mar 16, 2017

What stories should we be telling each other in these anxious times?

I love your writing. I hope, you don’t mind, if I reblog your post! 🙂

wake up and smell the humans

what stories

I just put a jacket on. It’s cold again. Winter is having a few last laughs while we ponder a future world cooked by a carbon dioxide soaked climate. The weather, always on our minds.

When I’m one hundred and ten and the young folk ask me what it was like when modern civilisation was in full swing, I’ll tell them, “They were anxious times.”

Not long ago, I was thinking that the time was ripe for some new form of literature to appear on the scene – that the novel, novella and the short story had possibly run past their use-by-date. Of course, there is flash fiction. So quick and easy as we rush around in this busy world. But, is flash just fashion? A flash in the pan?

One other new trend, a genre named ‘cli-fi’, is speculative fiction set within the post-modern-civilised-world of the near future that…

View original post 515 more words

No Class, Posted on October 6, 2019 By John Stepling

Below I copied some of John Stepling’s post, that is titled ‘No Class’.

It is interestig that Stepling cites several authors in connection with climate change, capitalism and class. He cites for instance John Bellamy Foster who talks about

the growth of various movements in the fascist genre (whether prefascism, protofascism, classical fascism, postfascism, neofascism, neoliberal fascism, ur-fascism, peripheral fascism, white supremacism, or national populism …..’

Stepling says that ‘global warming is a fact that humanity will have to adjust to and learn to live with.’ And that the ‘so labeled *Climate Change* crisis has very little to do with protecting Nature.’

He also says: ‘The incursion of technology into nearly every waking moment of the daily life of the Westerner has conditioned a populace, one that doesn’t read, to see the acceleration of everything as natural. . . And capitalism is not compatible with the direction those changes and care must take. Risking the direction for needed change by allowing capital investments to chart the course is a very dangerous idea.’ 

“I think that most of the confusion in this respect has been the product of a failure to develop a class analysis of these changes. From a class perspective, it is clear that what we are seeing is the growth of various movements in the fascist genre (whether prefascism, protofascism, classical fascism, postfascism, neofascism, neoliberal fascism, ur-fascism, peripheral fascism, white supremacism, or national populism—you can take your pick). Fascist-type movements share certain definite class-based characteristics or tendencies. Although it is common in liberal discourse to approach such movements at the level of appearance, in terms of their ideological characteristics, such an idealist methodology only throws a veil over the underlying reality. — John Bellamy Foster, Interview, Monthly Review, September 2019″

The purveyors of free-market global capitalism believe that they have a right to plunder the remaining natural resources of this planet as they choose. Anyone who challenges their agenda is to be subjected to whatever misrepresentation and calumny that serves the free market corporate agenda. — Michael Parenti, Interview with Jason Miller, 2016

When environmentalism unfolds within a system of heightened inequality and inadequate democratization, it does so unequally and autocratically. The result is not a “saved” climate, but rather enhanced revenue streams for corporations. — Maximillian Forte, Climate Propaganda for Corporate Profit: Bell Canada

 

The following I copied from Stepling’s writing:

“John Bellamy Foster noted that it was a lack of class analysis that has stifled left discourse over the last twenty years. And I have noted that when one does engage in class analysis the first response, very often, is to be called a conspiracy theorist. Now, this is largely because any class dissection will tend to unearth connections that have been hidden, consciously, by Capital — that those hidden forces and histories are experienced by the liberal left and faux left as somehow impossible. Class analysis means that the non-marxist liberal left is going to be faced with the malevolence of the ruling class, and in the U.S. certainly, the ruling class tends to be adored, secretly or otherwise, by the bourgeoisie.”

“When the U.S.S.R. dissolved the West intensified its propaganda onslaught immediately. And a good part of this propaganda was focused on the denial of class. On the right, the FOX News right, “class warfare” became a term of derision and also humour. And among liberal and educated bourgeoisie the avoidance of class was the result of a focus on, and validations of, rights for marginalized groups — even if that meant inventing new groups on occasion. Class was conspicuously missing in most identity rights discourse.”

“And the climate discourse, which was suddenly visible in mainstream media early 2000s, there was almost never a mention of class. Hence the new appropriation of that discourse by open racist eugenicists like “Sir” David Attenborough, and billionaire investors and publishers. Even by royalty. By 2015 or so there was what Denis Rancourt called the institutionalisation of a climate ethos. I have even seen of late self-identified leftists suggesting the “Greta” phenomenon was the working class finding its voice. (No, I’m not making that up). I have also seen many leftists — many of whom I have known for years — simply hysterical around the subject of this teenager. Her greatest appeal is to middle aged white men. I have no real explanation for that. But then these same men quote, often, everyone from Guy McPherson (who I think needs a padded cell, frankly) to Bill McKibben — an apologist for militarism and wealth… here …. […]”

I have read Stepling’s post several times. I am not sure what his opinion is as far as capital investment goes. Does he think that capital investment should not chart the course of needed change? He also says capitalism is not compatible with the direction those changes and care must take’.

Another thing is that he  describes Bill McKibben as an ‘apologist for militarism and wealth’. Is it perhaps that he means that the class of right wing ‘capitalists’ cannot be trusted to do something for the majority of people about climate change that would help the ordinary people in some way?

And what about Guy McPherson? This is what Wikipedia says about him:

Guy R. McPherson is an American scientist, professor emeritus[2] of natural resources and ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Arizona.[3][4] He is known for the idea of Near-Term Human Extinction (NTHE), a term he coined[4] about the likelihood of human extinction by 2030.”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guy_McPherson

Here I copied something about Guy McPherson’s latest book:

https://auntyuta.com/2019/10/10/only-love-remains-dancing-at-the-edge-of-extinction/

Stepling does insist that ‘Class exists and is part of the hierarchical system of global capitalism.’

 

 

Only Love Remains: Dancing at the Edge of Extinction

“The science is clear: Homo sapiens teeters on the brink of extinction. Industrial civilization is an omnicidal heat engine, yet terminating civilization heats the planet even faster in an outcome termed the McPherson Paradox. Only Love Remains: Dancing on the Edge of Extinction describes a way forward in light of our terminal diagnosis. In this book, professor emeritus of conservation biology Guy McPherson describes how we can proceed with urgency in the face of habitat loss for our species. While describing the evidence underlying human extinction within a few years, McPherson also provides an urgent and reasoned response to this prognosis.”

It’s not too late to stem climate change. But we have no more time to waste.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/outlook/its-not-too-late-to-stem-climate-change-but-we-have-no-more-time-to-waste/2019/04/26/8406aa64-525b-11e9-88a1-ed346f0ec94f_story.html

April 26

Meara Sharma writes about culture and the environment.

Author and environmentalist Bill McKibben wrote 30 years ago, “The End of Nature” This is latest book: “Falter: Has the Human Game Begun to Play Itself Out?

350 is building a future that’s just, prosperous, equitable and safe from the effects of climate change.

https://350.org/about/

We are bold, creative and strategic

The climate crisis is immense – we must be daring and courageous in response. We embrace new experiments and solutions, recognizing that this crisis requires new ways of solving problems.


#2:

We Work for Justice

The fight against climate change is a fight for justice. People all over the world are feeling the impacts, but the people suffering the most are the ones who have done the least to cause the problem.

The work we do — and the ways we do it — has to address that injustice. That means listening to the communities who are getting hit the hardest, amplifying the voices that are being silenced, and following the leadership of the people on the frontlines of the crisis.


#3:

We Care for and Trust One Another

We take care of ourselves and our communities, honor one another in our non-violent approach to this work, and share that spirit and learning with others.

No one has all the answers, so we value the experience and knowledge of our partners and our communities. That’s why we listen to our communities and our allies to learn and evolve together.


#4:

We are Stronger When We Collaborate

Climate change is not just an environmental issue, or a social justice issue, or an economic issue — it’s all of those things at once. The only way we will be strong enough to put pressure on governments and stand up to the fossil fuel industry is if we all work together.

That means bringing people together and building diverse coalitions — from students, to labor unions, human rights and social justice groups; from marginalized communities and faith groups, to universities, business owners and all those who believe in the need for transformational change.


#5:

We are Transparent and Accountable

To ensure the integrity of our work, we strive to be transparent and open, while respecting everyone’s right to privacy and ensuring people’s safety.

We are accountable to each other, to the people and groups we collaborate with, and to those impacted by our work. We strive to honor the relationships we build with each other.