The Age of Consequences

20 Mar

http://www.abc.net.au/4corners/stories/2017/03/20/4637278.htm

 

By PBS International, Jared P Scott

Updated March 20, 2017 20:24:00

The Age of Consequences

The Pentagon insiders with a climate change warning for the world.

The Age of Consequences – Monday 20 March 2017

“We are not your traditional environmentalists.” Gen. Gordon Sullivan (Retd), Fmr. Chief of Staff, U.S. Army

Four Corners brings you the views of distinguished former members of the US military and senior policy makers who warn that climate change is not only real, it’s a threat to global security.

“I’m here today not only representing my views on security implications of climate change, but on the collective wisdom of 16 admirals and generals.” Rear Admiral David Titley (Retd), U.S. Navy

They say climate change is impacting on vital resources, migration patterns and conflict zones.

“Climate change is one of the variables that must be considered when thinking about instability in the world.” Gen. Gordon Sullivan (Retd), Fmr. Chief of Staff, U.S. Army

Rear Admiral David Titley spent 32 years in the US military. He was the US Navy’s chief oceanographer and led the Navy’s Task Force on Climate Change. He argues climate change must be acknowledged.

“Our collective bottom line judgement is that climate change is an accelerating risk to our nation’s future.” Rear Admiral David Titley (Retd), U.S. Navy

The film analyses the conflict in Syria, the social unrest of the Arab Spring, and the rise of groups like ISIS and how these experts believe climate change is already acting as a catalyst for conflict.

“This is the heart of the problem in many ways. Climate change arrives in a world that has already been destabilised.” Dr Christian Parenti

Director Jared P Scott explores how water and food shortages, drought, extreme weather and rising sea-levels can act as accelerants of instability.

“We realised that climate change would be a threat multiplier for instability as people become desperate, because they have extreme weather and the seas are rising, and there are floods in one area and droughts in another, fragile states become more unpredictable.”Sherri Goodman, Fmr. Dept Undersecretary of Defense

These Pentagon insiders say a failure to tackle climate change, conducting ‘business as usual’, would lead to profound consequences.

“It’s a very dangerous thing to decide that there is one and only one line of events heading into the future and one and only one best response for dealing with that.” Leon Fuerth, Fmr. National Security Adviser, White House ’93-’01

The Age of Consequences, from PBS International, directed by Jared P Scott and presented by Sarah Ferguson, goes to air on Monday 20th March at 8.30pm EDT. It is replayed on Tuesday 21st March at 10.00am and Wednesday 22nd at 11pm. It can also be seen on ABC News 24 on Saturday at 8.00pm AEST, and at ABC iview.

http://iview.abc.net.au/programs/four-corners

 

6 Responses to “The Age of Consequences”

  1. gerard oosterman March 21, 2017 at 3:34 pm #

    The world with Trump in the US is in a bad shape. Australia too is slipping badly in the renewable state. We still seem to like holding on to outdated technologies by burning coal while we have so much sun and wind.

    • auntyuta March 21, 2017 at 4:22 pm #

      Gerard, the Prime Minister says, that we have to keep exporting coal otherwise our living standard will go down. Yes, domestically we use more and more wind and solar, but in some places more back-up is needed with other resources in case of unfavourable weather. The use of coal powered plants can be eliminated once there is enough back up in place for instance with sophisticated battery storage!

      Our government seems to think that a stable economy got to have priority over measures that help to reduce climate change. . . . .

      If you did not see yet this program “The Age of Consequences” you should aim at catching up with it. The people who talk in it really know what they are talking about. Every politician should watch it! How about making it compulsory? It was once very briefly mentioned today in Question Time.

      The Age of Consequences, from PBS International, directed by Jared P Scott and presented by Sarah Ferguson, went to air on Monday 20th March at 8.30pm EDT. It was replayed on Tuesday 21st March at 10.00am. On Wednesday 22nd it is replayed at 11pm. It can also be seen on ABC News 24 on Saturday at 8.00pm AEST, and at ABC iview.

      http://www.abc.net.au/foreign/content/2016/s4637274.htm

      “Just 15 years ago Venezuelans bathed in their oil riches, and in the revolutionary charisma of their radical leader Hugo Chavez.

      But cancer claimed Chavez, oil prices tanked and Latin America’s wealthiest state plunged into poverty.

      . . . .”

      I am going to watch foreign correspondent tonight!

      • gerard oosterman March 22, 2017 at 8:55 am #

        Yes, Uta. But how about we export stuff that we make or produce instead of digging up coal and exporting it where it will pollute wherever it gets burnt.?

        Tiny Holland with seventeen million people now have a larger export market than the UK and is twice the size of that of Australia.

        They are second in the world in the value of exporting agricultural products. Their electric trains run totally on wind power.

        Digging up stuff is not being innovative.

        We did see ABC 4corners and Sarah Ferguson always does a good job.

      • auntyuta March 22, 2017 at 2:04 pm #

        What a good example tiny Holland gives to the world! Thanks for pointing this out, Gerard. And as far as I am concerned, I also like the result of their last elections. We can hope that in some parts of the world extremism is still kept in check. Maybe some countries with less resources to plunder and a hard working population and innovative thinkers are better off for survival on the world stage. Holland is a good example.
        Foreign correspondent last night depressed me very much. Venezuela has now a huge number of not only very poor but also “extremely” poor people as well as criminal gangs with weapons. A revolution? What good is that going to do? To think that this could happen to the oil richest country in the world . . . . Why, why, why is no one concerned about masses and masses of poor people? They don’t let all of them die, they do get little bits of help here and there. It’s a matter of who can survive. under such circumstances. . . .
        Maybe there are just too many people in this world. And it is the poorest people that increase the most!
        As far as climate change is concerned, did not these “retired” bigwigs explain the reasons for excessive climate change and its consequences in a very plain, honest and easily to understand manner? And yet when they were in top positions in the military they were not allowed to rock the boat and had to go along with the decisions made by politicians and corporations. I realise, that a military coup cannot always be successful when not everybody of the people that count are willing to work for changes. It is very difficult to bring about changes in a rotten system without creating a lot of chaos. Some things just do take a lot of time. But climate change is already upon us. Do you think some prayers might help?

  2. gerard oosterman March 22, 2017 at 4:54 pm #

    Venezuela like Australia depended on natural resources but did very little with it except selling it to the highest bidder. Australia is in exactly that same mould. Oil is becoming old hat and with an oversupply the future is not rosy.
    We could have done things with our resources but preferred to take the lazy way out and just sell it to the market.
    I don’t know about praying. I doubt it helps but it also doesn’t harm except to those that get disappointed when prayers are not rewarded or listened to.

    • auntyuta March 22, 2017 at 5:56 pm #

      When I pray I do not necessarily look for a reward. It is more to calm my nerves and strengthen me for what is to come. Of course, I am happy when things turn out well, but this is then perhaps something like a more or less undeserved bonus. Life isn’t just celebrating, it is also mourning. Maybe at present we have quite a bit to mourn about. However I am too willing to celebrate when there is something to celebrate.

      Here again what it says about the program “The age of consequences”:

      http://iview.abc.net.au/programs/four-corners

      “Just 15 years ago Venezuelans bathed in their oil riches, and in the revolutionary charisma of their radical leader Hugo Chavez.
      But cancer claimed Chavez, oil prices tanked and Latin America’s wealthiest state plunged into poverty.”

      I think Hugo Chavez, the radical leader, was loved by his people, for because of him and the fact that they were oil rich they were for a while the wealthiest state in Latin America. Even if Chavez had not died, they would probably not as wealthy anymore now for there is not enough of a market for their oil, In the program they did not say much about the middle classes and the very rich in the country, only that there were masses and masses of poor.

      Gerard, referring to Australia you say: “We could have done things with our resources but preferred to take the lazy way out and just sell it to the market.”

      Sure, the same seems to apply to Venezuela. Still, our leaders were and are entirely different from Chavez. I find it rather baffling that we seem to be ending up with some of the same problems as the Venezuelans.

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