Ministry for Energiewende, Agriculture, and Environment in Schleswig Holstein, Germany

30 Jul

https://energytransition.org/2013/12/robert-habeck-germanys-first-and-only-minister-for-the-energiewende/

Robert Habeck: Germany’s First and Only Minister for the Energiewende

Germany’s northernmost region Schleswig Holstein was the first to establish an Energiewende ministry, which is now lead by the Green Robert Habeck. Paul Hockenos explains how the State became a pioneer of renewables – and the challenges that come with being the forerunner.

Robert Habeck

In Germany the plans are that “the last German nuclear reactor goes offline in 2022″.
And here I copy a bit more about plans for the inclusion of windpower and what had already been achieved in 2013:

” . . . . Schleswig-Holstein’s onshore wind power may be its big selling point today, but Habeck is not alone in envisaging the region as invaluable to the nation-wide Energiewende in other ways as well.

For one, the NordLink cabling to Norway will provide a vital option for storing electricity. Currently, the means of large-scale electricity storage is limited – a marked drawback for intermittent wind and solar power. One of the technologies ready-to-go is pumped-storage hydroelectric, which stores energy in the form of water, which is pumped from a low reservoir to one of higher elevation. When demand requires, the water is released through turbines to produce electric power.

Norway’s high-altitude fjords are so ideal for the purpose that some observers see Norway as “Europe’s battery“ of the future. Denmark and the Netherlands are already connected to Norwegian grid. Norway could store many thousands of megawatts of electricity for Germany. What’s needed is 600 kilometers of high-voltage power line along the floor of the Baltic Sea, which will take years to engineer.

And then there’s the enormous potential of offshore wind power, so far one of the Energiewende’s underachievers. Between Germany’s two seas, Schleswig-Holstein should be in the cat bird’s seat. Yet, so dismal have the results of offshore has been – and so spectacular the success of onshore and solar PV – many critics argue that offshore is an unnecessary and expensive lark.

Habeck disagrees. “It’s right now to scale back the goals set for offshore,” says Habeck, referring to the plans of Germany’s incoming administration. ”We may not need it to get Germany to 50% clean electricity. But to get to 100% we will definitely need it. And that’s our goal.“

This post by Paul Hockenos was first published in the European Energy Review. Paul Hockenos is a Berlin-based journalist and author of the Going Renewable blog.”

Just look at this section which shows what can be done as far as alternative energy is concerned:

Norway’s high-altitude fjords are so ideal for the purpose that some observers see Norway as “Europe’s battery“ of the future. Denmark and the Netherlands are already connected to Norwegian grid. Norway could store many thousands of megawatts of electricity for Germany. What’s needed is 600 kilometers of high-voltage power line along the floor of the Baltic Sea, which will take years to engineer.”

One Response to “Ministry for Energiewende, Agriculture, and Environment in Schleswig Holstein, Germany”

  1. stuartbramhall August 1, 2017 at 7:24 am #

    Germany has been an inspiration for the world in ending nuclear power and championing renewable energy. They were very prophetic about its potential.

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