John Lord: . . .The issue though is will the right win, will they be emboldened to move further right to satisfy the interests of the establishment, corporates and rich individuals . . .

 

John Lord writes in the AIM (Australian Independent Media) Network:

“By this time next week, only those who haven’t voted pre-poll will be left to cast their vote in this most important election. All the policies, or lack of them, will have resonated with the electorate in varying degrees. Some will vote in a state of confusion but most with certainty. The young have become engaged and hopefully, they might return our democracy to some form of respectability and transparency. The issue though is will the right win, will they be emboldened to move further right to satisfy the interests of the establishment, corporates and rich individuals. Or on the other hand, will the electorate be prepared to give Labor’s policies of change a chance?”

So the question is, will the electorate give Labor’s policies of change a chance?

I reckon we know the mind of some in the electorate who can’t wait for the results of the election hoping that Labor is going to get a go. I mean there are some people who definitely want to see Labor in government. Are these very determined people more than 30%? Maybe. On the other hand, there are probably quite a lot of people that are still a bit undecided which party they would like to see in government. One thing is for sure, to satisfy the interests of the establishment, corporates and rich individuals you have to be on centre/ right and vote for the Coalition, that is Liberal/National.

So the people that are still undecided, will they be going to the right or to the left? This is the question. These undecided voters, who in the end are not going to vote for the Coalition, have to be very brave to vote against the interests of ‘the establishment, corporates and rich individuals’.

Are the majority of these undecided voters brave enough to vote against these interests? We’ll see . . . .

You’ll find what John Lord says here:

John Lord’s Election Diary No13: Shorten has dared to go where other Labor leaders have not

 

4 thoughts on “John Lord: . . .The issue though is will the right win, will they be emboldened to move further right to satisfy the interests of the establishment, corporates and rich individuals . . .

  1. Labor party will get in, must get in. The LNP is disjoined and in chaos with Morrison now more on his own than at any other time. A kind of president without a party or policy.
    The ALP is marginally better. They too suffer from giving tax cuts at the cost of societal needs that is begging for funding. Did anyone read the latest on Aged Care by the ABC.?

    1. I just had a look at this, Gerard:

      https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-05-10/eunice-and-john-allen-wait-for-home-care-package/11098848

      This is what it says in this article: ” . . . he waiting list sits at over 127,000 people, and while the Government website myagedcare.gov.au lists the expected waiting period as 12-plus months for a level 2, 3 or 4 package, the Aged Care Royal Commission heard in March 2019 that many people are waiting much longer.
      The commission heard that for those needing the highest level of care the average wait time was 22 months.
      More than 16,000 people died waiting for their Home Care Package in the 12 months to the end of June 2018. . . . ”

      We watched Bill Shorten this morning on Onsiders:

      https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-05-12/bill-shorten-appears-on-insiders/11105056

      The Opposition Leader discussed Labor’s financial policies with Barrie Cassidy.

      You say that Labor want to give tax cuts at the cost of societal needs that is begging for funding. Can you elaborate on this, Gerard?

      In recent times Labor was a bit too much right leaning for my liking. But I am under the impression, that Shorten wants to change this. And he seems to have a good team supporting him! 🙂

  2. Giving tax cuts at the cost of societal needs means that less money will be available for spending on aged care, education, pensions, unemployment money, public housing etc. We don’t need tax cuts we need more revenue (tax increases) coming in. This can be achieved by stopping tax evasion by corporations, stopping family trusts being used to minimise taxation, stop negative gearing on properties, and stopping franking credits on shares as well as putting up GST. Our tax burden is small compared with many OECD countries.

    1. ” . . . stopping tax evasion by corporations, stopping family trusts being used to minimise taxation, stop negative gearing on properties, and stopping franking credits on shares as well as putting up GST. Our tax burden is small compared with many OECD countries.”
      If Labor gets into government, Gerard, maybe all this can be achieved! With the coalition government it would probably be more of the same, namely tax the wealthy less and less. And you’re right, then there would be less and less funding for societal needs. I still think, that maybe a lot of people in the electorate may be so scared of a downturn in the economy if Labor comes into office, that they will bring the Coalition back into government – – – My hope is though, that a majority of voters – and especially the new young voters – will be brave enough to vote for a change!! 🙂

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